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Brito D.,FCT Inc. | Pereira P.,LECG | Pereira P.,University of Lisbon | Vareda J.,CEFAGE UE
International Journal of Industrial Organization | Year: 2010

We analyze if two-part access tariffs solve the dynamic consistency problem of the regulation of next generation networks. We model the industry as a duopoly, where a vertically integrated incumbent and a downstream entrant, that requires access to the incumbent's network, compete on Hotelling's line. The incumbent can invest in the deployment of a next generation network that improves the quality of the retail services. We have three main results. First, we show that if the regulator can commit to a policy, a regulatory moratorium may emerge as socially optimal. Second, we show that if the regulator cannot commit to a policy, it can induce investment only when the investment cost is low. Third, we show that in this case, two-part tariffs involve very large payments from the entrant to the incumbent. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

OAKVILLE, ON--(Marketwired - March 02, 2017) - FCT announced today the retirement of Patrick Chetcuti, president, after a 26-year career that began in 1992. Chetcuti will continue with FCT as a member of its board of directors. "I'd like to thank Pat for his leadership and vision in growing the title insurance industry in Canada," said FCT CEO Michael LeBlanc. "It has been a pleasure to work closely with Pat for the past 23 years. I respect his insight and dedication to both our customers and our business, and I'm grateful he will remain involved with the company as a board member." After running a successful real estate law practice for 20 years in Hamilton, Ontario, Chetcuti helped bring title insurance to Canada. Chetcuti was confident that title insurance could improve the real estate conveyancing process and change the way real estate transactions were handled in Canada. "We knew we had a better solution for consumers," said Chetcuti in a previous interview available on the FCT Blog. "People told us we were crazy -- the old way was how real estate transactions had been managed for decades and decades." Since then, FCT has been a leader in the industry thanks to the vision, hard work and dedication of FCT's employees. "Yes, we're at the forefront of our industry. But to me, the real success is to be able to sit back and watch the accomplishments of the amazing people who came to work for us," said Chetcuti. "They're more than employees. They're friends. How nice it is to be able to visit our building and still have a great sense of family." Founded in 1991, the FCT group of companies is based in Oakville, Ontario, and has over 800 employees across the country. The group provides industry-leading title insurance, default solutions and other real estate-related products and services to approximately 1,250 lenders, 43,000 legal professionals and 5,000 recovery professionals, as well as real estate agents, mortgage brokers and builders, nationwide. The Great Place to Work® Institute has named FCT one of Canada's Top 50 Best Workplaces for two consecutive years (2015, 2016) and certified FCT as a Great Place to Work. FCT's parent company, First American Financial Corporation, was named by Fortune® magazine as one of the 100 best companies to work for in America in 2016. For more information on FCT, please visit the company website at www.fct.ca. † The FCT group of companies includes FCT Insurance Company Ltd., which provides title and valuation insurance with the exception of commercial policies, which are provided jointly by FCT Insurance Company Ltd. and First American Title Insurance Company. Services by First Canadian Title Company Limited.


Lentz T.,FCT Inc.
IPC APEX EXPO 2014 | Year: 2014

The trajectory of electronic design and its associated miniaturization shows no signs of altering course. Surface Mount Technology will require innovative materials and processes to stay in lockstep with other segments of the electronics industry. Nano-coatings have been introduced by various manufacturers, with the promise of addressing some of the challenges relative to solder paste printing. Stated benefits include: Reduced underside cleaning, reduced bridging, improved solder paste release and improvements in yield. With several nano technologies already on the market and more likely to be introduced, how can the performance be quantified? How robust are these coatings? How can an assembler approach the ROI of these coatings? What hidden benefits or negative impacts should be considered? This paper will present a rigorous method for evaluating the performance and economic benefits of solder paste stencil nanocoatings. Criterion such as underside cleaning, bridging, transfer efficiency across SARs, solder paste deposit geometry, post-print cleaning, and abrasion resistance of the coating, will all be considered and weighted. Performance of currently available coatings will be compared. A discussion of the economic impact on current and future SMT design will be included.


Anifowose B.,Coventry University | Odubela M.,FCT Inc.
Journal of Cleaner Production | Year: 2015

Climate change impacts are increasingly becoming more evident e.g. through heavy rainfall episodes and subsequent flooding. Methane is a significant greenhouse gas that has been linked to these impacts and the oil and gas industry is a major source of anthropogenic methane emission. Recent studies have suggested that the tropical region hold some unexpectedly high methane concentration and that the recent changes in the global methane burden are poorly understood. To address this research gap, we present a first effort to quantify methane emissions from one of the most vulnerable oil and gas infrastructures in Nigeria (a tropical country). A combination of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change tier-1 approach and an adapted Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation model was used to estimate methane emissions from the system 2C transport pipeline. We then tested the hypothesis of no significant change in methane emissions trend from the pipeline using the between group t-test inferential analysis. Key findings include: (a) a crude oil throughput of 55,143 to 1,500,500 barrels (8767 to 238,561 m3) emitted methane ranging from 0.04734 to 1.288MT (± 50 to 200%) respectively, and (b) surprisingly, methane emissions along the system 2C pipeline seem to have continued without significant change between 2005, and 2008 to 2012 despite the low crude oil throughput in 2009. This indicates the likelihood of continuous but rising methane emissions from the pipeline network over a six-year period; and only further research can ascertain if similar trend can be observed elsewhere in the tropical region. These findings are unique and contribute to the current global debate on methane emissions from the largely unmonitored tropical region. Therefore, we recommend that stakeholders should set up a study plan for the identification and continuous monitoring of methane emissions from the key oil and gas infrastructure and explore opportunities for geoengineering applications as part of climate change mitigation. Coordinated engagement in international schemes such as the Natural Gas STAR program, Climate and Clean Air Coalition, Global Methane Initiative amongst others would promote strategic and measurable methane reduction plans in Nigeria and other countries within/outside the tropical region. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Krippahl L.,FCT Inc. | Barahona P.,FCT Inc.
Algorithms for Molecular Biology | Year: 2015

This paper presents a constraint-based method for improving protein docking results. Efficient constraint propagation cuts over 95% of the search time for finding the configurations with the largest contact surface, provided a contact is specified between two amino acid residues. This makes it possible to scan a large number of potentially correct constraints, lowering the requirements for useful contact predictions. While other approaches are very dependent on accurate contact predictions, ours requires only that at least one correct contact be retained in a set of, for example, one hundred constraints to test. It is this feature that makes it feasible to use readily available sequence data to predict specific potential contacts. Although such prediction is too inaccurate for most purposes, we demonstrate with a Naïve Bayes Classifier that it is accurate enough to more than double the average number of acceptable models retained during the crucial filtering stage of protein docking when combined with our constrained docking algorithm. All software developed in this work is freely available as part of the Open Chemera Library. © Krippahl and Barahona; licensee BioMed Central.


We report 4 cases of patients diagnosed with stress-induced cardiomyopathy and the pattern of typical apical ballooning syndrome (ABS), who presented to our institution with chest pain, mildly elevated cardiac enzymes and ischemic electrocardiographic changes, found to have severe hypokinesis or akinesis of the mid to apical segments with dynamic basal segments on two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography along with a global longitudinal strain (GLS) pattern markedly different from the typical left anterior descending artery (LAD) myocardial infarction pattern. All of them had a similar GLS pattern on presentation, which was easy to recognize on the polar map the day of the event. Three of the patients underwent left heart catheterization and found to have nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). We discuss the usefulness of early recognition of ABS using GLS images. Mini-Abstract In this case series we report 4 cases of patients diagnosed with stress induced cardiomyopathy apical ballooning syndrome (ABS), who presented to our institution with chest pain, mildly elevated cardiac enzymes and ischemic electrocardiographic changes. They were found to have severe hypokinesis or akinesis of the mid to apical segments with dynamic basal segments on echocardiography. A global longitudinal strain (GLS) pattern on polar map was markedly different from the pattern of proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD) myocardial infarction. All of them had a similar GLS pattern on presentation, which was easy to recognize on these polar maps images the day of the event. We discuss the usefulness of early recognition of ABS using global longitudinal strain images. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2009

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will utilize direct-methane SOFCs to produce syngas by reacting methane with oxygen using electrochemical partial oxidation (EPOx). Syngas is a precursor for hydrogen and synthetic liquid chemicals/fuels including methanol and various hydrocarbons. Advantages are similar to ceramic membrane reactors: syngas without nitrogen dilution and reduced cost due to process intensification by combining the oxygen separation and partial oxidation steps. SOFCs have an added advantage - dual products: syngas and electricity - that can significantly improve economics. FCT recently demonstrated high-rate production of syngas (30 sccm/cm2) and high electrical power density (0.9 W/cm2) at 750ýýC using conventional Ni-YSZ anode-supported SOFCs. Stable SOFC electrical output was reported for up to 300 hours. This project will develop alternate support materials for SOFCs that facilitate direct stable operation in fuels such as natural gas and in the presence of sulfur. FCT proposes to implement its expertise in segmented in series SOFC design into for scaling up EPOx for commercial applications. A scale-up of EPOx generation to a small stack of approximately 100W and 4L/min of syngas will be performed. This project demonstrates a new technology with potentially major impact in the fuel cell and alternative fuels areas. It is well known that cost is the main barrier to commercial introduction of fuel cells and the acceptance of fuels such as hydrogen. By co-producing syngas/hydrogen and electricity, the method demonstrated here has the potential to decrease the cost of both. This will not be an incremental decrease in cost, as might be expected for an improvement of a technology, but a substantial decrease as a result of a completely new approach. This new technology has the potential to significantly impact commercialization of these technologies.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2010

This SBIR Phase I project will develop a more durable high-temperature solid oxide electrochemical cell that can be used to electrolyze carbon dioxide and water into hydrogen and carbon monoxide for the further production of liquid fuels. The research will be focused on the analyses of the degradation mechanisms and stability of high temperature electrodes. The technology can be used to sequestrate carbon dioxide, convert cheap electricity into chemical energy for storage, and provide a flexible device for the conversion between electricity and chemical energy.

The broader/commercial impact of the project will be that the technology to be developed can be used to sequester carbon dioxide from power plants and meanwhile convert carbon dioxide and water into carbon monoxide and hydrogen for the production of hydrocarbon fuel. The technology will also provide a method to store chemical energy using cheap electricity. The solid oxide electrochemical cell has the potential to be a flexible device operated as either an electrolyzer or fuel cell for the conversion between electricity and chemical fuels. Compared to existing low-temperature water electrolysis, the high-temperature solid oxide electrochemical cell can achieve high energy conversion efficiency.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2010

This SBIR Phase I project will develop a more durable high-temperature solid oxide electrochemical cell that can be used to electrolyze carbon dioxide and water into hydrogen and carbon monoxide for the further production of liquid fuels. The research will be focused on the analyses of the degradation mechanisms and stability of high temperature electrodes. The technology can be used to sequestrate carbon dioxide, convert cheap electricity into chemical energy for storage, and provide a flexible device for the conversion between electricity and chemical energy. The broader/commercial impact of the project will be that the technology to be developed can be used to sequester carbon dioxide from power plants and meanwhile convert carbon dioxide and water into carbon monoxide and hydrogen for the production of hydrocarbon fuel. The technology will also provide a method to store chemical energy using cheap electricity. The solid oxide electrochemical cell has the potential to be a flexible device operated as either an electrolyzer or fuel cell for the conversion between electricity and chemical fuels. Compared to existing low-temperature water electrolysis, the high-temperature solid oxide electrochemical cell can achieve high energy conversion efficiency.


Trademark
FCT Inc. | Date: 2013-03-25

Solder paste stencil used in the printed circuit board assembly industry.

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