FATEC Santo Andre

Brazil

FATEC Santo Andre

Brazil

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Delatore F.,FATEC Santo Andre | Leonardi F.,State University of Maringa | Novazzi L.F.,State University of Maringa | da Cruz J.J.,University of Sao Paulo
International Conference on Integrated Modeling and Analysis in Applied Control and Automation | Year: 2013

Multivariable control techniques have been applied to chemical plants, ranging from multi-loop control up to predictive controls. This work intends to present a study developed using a control solution based on the H∞ design with time domains specifications applied on a heat exchanger network (HEN) with bypasses. The HEN is frequently used in chemical processes to promote energy transfer between hot/cold streams, reducing the utility consumption as its main objective. The H∞ control is used here to ensure a prescribed time domain response by means of a solution of model matching problem so that the closed loop dynamics are approximately the same as the ones of the reference model. The simulations results have demonstrated that the proposed control leads to a good performance with process variables decoupled, null offset and output responses with the prescribed dynamics.


Delatore F.,FATEC Santo Andre | Leonardi F.,State University of Maringa | Carvalho A.T.,FATEC Santo Andre | Morioka C.A.,FATEC Santo Andre
International Conference on Integrated Modeling and Analysis in Applied Control and Automation | Year: 2012

Tradionally, the throttle valve positioning was performed mechanically by means of a steel cable. Nowadays at the embedded system stage, an electromechanical system named as Drive by Wire (DBW) substitutes the direct positioning. The DBW is controlled by the vehicle Engine Control Unit (ECU) and is responsible to adjust the mass air flow delivered to the engine and to control the idle engine rotation. The throttle valve control is somehow a challenging task because of nonlinear phenomena caused by the spring and the gearbox. The present work aims to design a robust parametric control for a DBW system, using a plant model identified numerically at different operations points. The results show that the controller is able to deal with the nonlinear phenomena providing a reasonable performance with no steady state error and a consistent setting time.


Serafim Albaladejo F.,FATEC Santo Andre | De Carvalho A.T.,FATEC Santo Andre | Morioka C.A.,FATEC Santo Andre | Leonardi F.,State University of Maringa | Delatore F.,Anhanguera
IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference, EDUCON | Year: 2013

The automotive engineering education area, specifically on internal combustion engine, requires the use of suitable systems, capable to simulate, test and obtain specifics data from its operation. Automotive engines are so complex due to it is a mix of engineering subjects, so, an 'alive engine' named as mockup was created to help its study. The mockup is an exactly the same engine that equips a vehicle, but assembled in a mechanical base, equipped with all the necessary components for running it up. The objective of this work is to develop a mockup with a suitable Electronic Control Unit (ECU) board, in order to obtain the sensors/actuators signals from the engine and control some important engine functions by using an external ECU, so that the students may test their own strategies, compare with the original ECU. © 2013 IEEE.


Santos M.M.D.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | Neme J.H.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | Franco F.R.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | Stevan S.L.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Innovative Computing, Information and Control | Year: 2015

Current and next generations of passenger and commercial, vehicles have functions with increasingly higher levels of complexity. The traditional methodologies of software development are not robust enough to meet the requirements for current vehicle systems. Modern features and. functions must provide improved properties in terms of drivability, safety, comfort and performance, and also additional, features, such as driver assistance and connectivity. In order to address those challenges, new development methodologies and standards for automotive embedded systems are necessary to ensure the correct process for all phases of the automotive software engineering, from development to production. Model-based design (MDD) methodology represents a key methodology which may satisfy those demands of automotive software development. It considers that the first step is to define the requirements based in the physical, plant, simulated, followed by the development, of the controller, and then a set of test cases are performed with the controller, to validate the initial requirements. The first stage of MDD, model-in-the-loop, is presented for the power window function of an automotive system. © 2015 ICIC International.


Santos M.M.D.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | Neme J.H.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | Franco F.R.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | Stevan S.L.,Federal University of Technology of Parana | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Innovative Computing, Information and Control | Year: 2015

Modal-Based Development (MBD) is a design methodology, which has been widely used in automotive embedded software. Within this methodology, engineering pro-eesses involve both manufacturers and suppliers, which is suitable for the next generation of automotive E/E systems. All players benefit from standardized information exchange, workflow and toolchain. We present a model-based functional safety exterior lighting system, which is an important vehicular function hosted in the electronic control module. This function was developed and tested in Model-In-the-Loop. Software-In-the-Loop and rapid control prototyping development stages, from the supplier side. This demonstrated that, in preliminary and virtual phases, it is important to be able to find bugs and generate quality software when deploying on target systems. The approach considered the software tool to verify the function with a set of test cases that validate the preliminary requirements. © 2015, IJICIC Editorial Office. All rights reserved.


Businaro D.A.,FATEC Santo Andre | Sforcin F.,FATEC Santo Andre | Gomes C.W.,Ford Motor Company | De Salvo Jr. O.,Volkswagen AG
SAE Technical Papers | Year: 2013

Several injection and ignition systems have been developed and tested since the invention of the internal combustion engine. As environmental regulations have become more stringent over the years, an electronic injection and ignition systems of the mixture air/fuel was implemented in the vehicles. Since then these systems have constantly been improved with the inclusion of devices, sensors and actuators that help them work more efficiently, both to gain power and for the enforcement of environmental laws in force in each country. For the correct operation of the engine electronic management it is extremely important to develop a software that can perfectly control the inputs (sensors) and outputs (actuators) information. The task of adjustment and calibration of the software requires a programmable module, which is connected to the vehicle and tested with various settings until an ideal fit between performance and emissions can be reached. This paper proposes the implementation of a programmable electronic management system that can replace the original system of the vehicle without exceeding the limits of pollutant emissions described in the Brazilian legislation. To achieve this goal, it will be necessary to analyze the behavior of the vehicle with its original management system and with the use of specific equipment such as the gas analyzer (emission pollutants), the automotive scanner (parameters of the management system) and the dynamometer (power and torque). Therefore this work presents the methodology, testing, advantages, disadvantages and limitations of implementing a programmable electronic management system for an internal combustion engine. © 2013 SAE INTERNATIONAL.

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