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Schindler A.,University of Milan | Denaro N.,AO. S. Croce e Carle Cuneo | Russi E.G.,AO. S. Croce e Carle Cuneo | Pizzorni N.,University of Milan | And 17 more authors.
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology | Year: 2015

Background: Head and neck cancer (HNC) and its therapy are associated with acute and late swallowing dysfunction. Consensus guidelines regarding evaluation and management are lacking. To address this gap, a multidisciplinary team of experts (oncologists, practitioners, deglutologists, etc.) met in Milan 17-18 February 2013 with the aim of reaching a consensus on the management of swallowing difficulties in HNC patients treated with radiotherapy with or without systemic therapies (such as chemotherapy and targeted agents). The consensus was focused particularly on those statements with limited evidence.The results of the literature review and the statements that obtained a consensus are reported and discussed in this paper. Materials and methods: The Delphi Appropriateness Method was used for this consensus. External expert reviewers then evaluated the conclusions carefully according to their area of expertise. Results: This paper contains 6 clusters of statements about the management of swallowing problems in radio-treated HNC patients and a review of the recent literature on these topics. Conclusions: Dysphagia assessment and its management are difficult and require a multi-team cooperation (ENT specialists, radiation and medical oncologists, deglutologists, etc.). © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source


Mirabile A.,Head and Neck Medical Oncology Unit | Numico G.,Medical Oncology Unit | Russi E.G.,A.O. S. Croce e Carle | Bossi P.,Head and Neck Medical Oncology Unit | And 20 more authors.
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology | Year: 2015

The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of infections and sepsis. The Delphi appropriateness method was used for this consensus. External expert reviewers then evaluated the conclusions carefully according to their area of expertise. The paper contains seven clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of infections and sepsis in head and neck cancer patients, which had a consensus. Furthermore, it offers a review of recent literature in these topics. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Source

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