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Inchingolo F.,General Hospital | Tatullo M.,University of Bari | Abenavoli F.M.,Hospital Fatebenefratelli | Marrelli M.,Calabrodental | And 3 more authors.
Head and Neck Oncology | Year: 2011

Introduction. The expression non Hodgkin lymphoma is used to cover a wide group of lymphoid neoplasias unrelated to Hodgkin's disease, due to the huge histological variety and the tendency to affect organs and tissues that does not physiologically contain lymphoid cells. The intraoral location is not frequent (3 - 5 percent of cases) and the initial manifestations of the disease rarely take place here. Case presentation. We describe the case of a 73 years old Italian caucasian male who came to our attention with a tongue lesion. The clinical manifestation was macroglossia and bleeding, probably deriving from the tongue-bite injuries. The patient had been complaining of dyspnea for 48 hours. Conclusion. A tongue affected by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma rarely occurs. In spite of this, this possibility should always be considered for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lesions affecting such area. A rapid diagnostic assessment, together with an adequate histopathologic verification, are indeed essential to improve the management and the prognosis of this disease. © 2011 Inchingolo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Gulli G.,Major Hospital SS. Annunziata | Frasson S.,FADOI Foundation | Borzi V.,Hospital Policlinico Vittorio Emanuele | Fontanella A.,Hospital Fatebenefratelli | And 11 more authors.
Acta Diabetologica | Year: 2014

Appropriate management of hyperglycemia is crucial for patients with type 2 diabetes. Aim of the FADOI-DIAMOND study was to evaluate real-world management of type 2 diabetic patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine wards (IMW) and the effects of a standardized educational intervention for IMW staff. DIAMOND has been carried out in 53 Italian IMW, with two cross-sectional surveys interspersed with an educational program (PRE phase and POST phase). In PRE phase, each center reviewed the charts of the last 30 hospitalized patients with known type 2 diabetes. An educational program was conducted in each center by means of the “outreach visit,” a face-to-face meeting between IMW staff and a trained external expert. Six months after, each center repeated the data collection (POST phase), specular to the PRE. A total of 3,167 patients were enrolled (1,588 PRE and 1,579 POST). From PRE phase to POST, patients with registered anthropometric data (54.1 vs. 74.9 %, p < 0.001) and in-hospital/recent measurement of glycated hemoglobin (48.2 vs. 61.4 %, p < 0.005) increased significantly. After educational program, more patients received insulin during hospitalization (68.3 vs. 63.6 %, p = 0.005). A more relevant variation in glycemia during hospitalization was observed in POST phase than PRE (−22.2 vs. −15.5 mg/dL, p < 0.001), without differences as for occurrence of hypoglycemia (12.3 vs. 11.9 %). A one-shot educational intervention led to persistent improvement in the management of hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes and to significant better glycemic control. Further studies might evaluate the effectiveness of a more aggressive educational program, on both management and outcomes. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Italia. Source


Inchingolo F.,University of Bari | Tatullo M.,University of Bari | Abenavoli F.M.,Hospital Fatebenefratelli | Inchingolo A.D.,University of Bari | And 2 more authors.
Head and Face Medicine | Year: 2010

Fishing is one of the best known and practiced human activities. However, you should remember that, when casting the hook from the riverbank or grasping it to add bait, fishermen run a real risk of injury if the hook punctures the skin. Briefly we describe a case where a young, 32-year-old fisherman who was reeling the hook back to shore when it hit him in the face and embedded itself in his upper eyelid. Upon examination, the eye was found to be unharmed and the hook was removed through a small incision and the aid of a local anesthetic. In the light of this case report, we think it a good idea to advise our friends and patients who we know to be fishermen to wear some form of eye protection as a precaution. © 2010 Inchingolo et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Inchingolo F.,General Hospital | Tatullo M.,Medical Biology and Physics | Abenavoli F.M.,Hospital Fatebenefratelli | Marrelli M.,Calabrodental | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2010

Introduction. Anisocoria indicates a difference in pupil diameter. Etiologies of this clinical manifestation usually include systemic causes as neurological or vascular disorders, and local causes as congenital iris disorders and pharmacological effects. Case Report. We present a case of a 47-year-old man, suffering from spastic tetraparesis. After the oral surgery under general anesthesia, the patient developed severe anisocoria: in particular, a ~4mm diameter increase of the left pupil compared to the right pupil. We performed Computed Tomography (CT) in the emergency setting, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the brain and Magnetic Resonance Angiography of intracranial vessels. These instrumental examinations did not show vascular or neurological diseases. The pupils returned to their physiological condition (isocoria) after about 180 minutes. Discussion and Conclusions. Literature shows that the cases of anisocoria reported during or after oral surgery are rare occurrences, especially in cases of simple tooth extraction. Anisocoria can manifest in more or less evident forms: therefore, it is clear that knowing this clinical condition is of crucial importance for a correct and timely resolution. © Ivyspring International Publisher. Source


Gussoni G.,FADOI Foundation | Frasson S.,FADOI Foundation | La Regina M.,Hospital Spezzino | Di Micco P.,Hospital Fatebenefratelli | Monreal M.,Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol
Thrombosis Research | Year: 2013

Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), and particularly those with cancer, are at increased risk of recurrences, major bleeding, and short- / medium-term mortality. Data from 35,539 patients (6,075 of these with cancer), presenting with symptomatic VTE in the previous three months and enrolled in the worldwide RIETE registry, were evaluated to assess overall and pulmonary embolism (PE)-related mortality, and their potential predictors, with particular focus on patients with cancer. Overall 3-month mortality in the total RIETE population was 7.9%, and death was considered PE-related in 1.4%. Significantly more patients died among those with cancer (26.4%, vs 4.1% in no-cancer group, p < 0.001). In 3.0% of cancer patients death was considered PE-related, compared to 1.0% in no-cancer group (p < 0.001). Cancer was the strongest independent risk factor for both all-cause and PE-related mortality, and in the subgroup of cancer patients those with advanced disease, reduced mobility, chronic pulmonary disease, and those experiencing PE (vs isolated deep vein thrombosis) were at increased risk of PE-related death. According to the findings of our very large, real-world registry, in the three months following an acute episode VTE remains a substantial cause of mortality. Cancer patients are at particular high risk of VTE-related death. Clinical factors predicting a fatal PE identified in this study (cancer, immobility, comorbidities, increasing age, PE at presentation), could be considered for risk stratification scheme for secondary prophylaxis in daily practice. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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