Farmingdale, NY, United States
Farmingdale, NY, United States

Farmingdale State College SUNY, is an American institution of higher education located on Long Island in East Farmingdale, New York. Formerly known as the State University of New York at Farmingdale or SUNY Farmingdale, it is a college of the State University of New York. The college was chartered in 1912 as a school of applied agriculture under the name of New York State School Of Agriculture on Long IslandFSC currently offers bachelor's degrees in health science, communications, economics, business, criminal justice, and computer systems along with engineering technology degrees such as aeronautical science, telecommunications, architecture/construction, manufacturing, and electrical engineering. Farmingdale also offer associate degrees in liberal arts and science, landscape development, and medical laboratory technology. Wikipedia.


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We study the global regularity of classical solution to two-and-half-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations with horizontal dissipation and horizontal magnetic diffusion. We prove that any possible finite time blow-up can be controlled by the L∞-norm of the vertical components. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The nation’s Best Construction Management Degree Programs have been ranked by leading online higher education resource site Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org). Comparing data from both online and on-campus programs at two- and four-year schools respectively, the lists determine which schools provide the best overall Construction Management training for 2016-2017. Top scoring four-year schools include the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Utah Valley University, Florida State College at Jacksonville, College of Southern Nevada and Roger Williams University; top scoring two-year schools include Metropolitan Community College, Piedmont Community College, Cape Fear Community College, Edmonds Community College and Santa Fe Community College. “Construction management is a great degree for those interested in advancing their career in architecture, design or a variety of skilled trades,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “As student demand increases, the number of schools offering formal construction management degrees also rises, making our analysis of each program around the country extremely beneficial for college-bound students.” More than a dozen different school-specific metrics, from graduation rates to student-teacher ratios, are weighed against one another to determine the Best Construction Management Degree Programs in the country. Colleges must also meet a handful of standard guidelines to qualify for the AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org list; institutions are required to be accredited public or private not-for-profit entities. Each must also offer students career placement assistance or services. All schools named on the 2016-2017 Best Construction Management Degree Programs in the U.S. list are included below. Specific details on data and methodology used, as well as ranking order for each list can be found at the following link: Albany Technical College Arizona Western College Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Bossier Parish Community College Cabrillo College Cape Fear Community College Central Community College Central New Mexico Community College College of the Canyons College of the Desert Community College of Allegheny County Cosumnes River College Delaware County Community College Delta College Diablo Valley College Edmonds Community College Erie Community College Frederick Community College Gwinnett Technical College Harrisburg Area Community College - Harrisburg Inver Hills Community College Ivy Tech Community College Joliet Junior College Laney College Lee College Lorain County Community College Mesa Community College Metropolitan Community College Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College North Hennepin Community College Northland Pioneer College Parkland College Pickens Technical College Piedmont Community College Pitt Community College Prince George's Community College Rowan-Cabarrus Community College San Diego Mesa College Santa Fe Community College Savannah Technical College Sinclair College South Suburban College Texas State Technical College - Waco The Community College of Baltimore County Trinidad State Junior College Ventura College Victor Valley College Washburn Institute of Technology Washtenaw Community College Wilkes Community College Bowling Green State University - Main Campus Brazosport College Broward College Central Washington University College of Southern Nevada CUNY New York City College of Technology Drexel University Dunwoody College of Technology Eastern Michigan University Farmingdale State College Ferris State University Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Florida State College at Jacksonville Indian River State College John Brown University Kennesaw State University Lawrence Technological University Mississippi State University Missouri Western State University Montana State University - Northern Morgan State University Navajo Technical University North Dakota State University - Main Campus Northern Michigan University Northern New Mexico College Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City Pensacola State College Philadelphia University Pittsburg State University Pratt Institute – Main Campus Roger Williams University Seminole State College of Florida Snow College State College of Florida-Manatee - Sarasota SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Delhi The University of Montana University of Akron Main Campus University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Minnesota - Twin Cities University of Oklahoma - Norman Campus Utah State University Utah Valley University Valencia College Weber State University Western Carolina University Youngstown State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 10, 2015
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Two years from now, Shamu will be putting on a less intensive show at SeaWorld’s San Diego location. This is good news for animal lovers, but it doesn’t mean the amusement park is backing away from the business model that made it rich. In fact, the changes are more likely a sign that SeaWorld is doubling down on its killer whale performers. During a shareholder presentation Monday, SeaWorld CEO Joel Manby announced the company was eliminating the current, “theatrical” orca show at its San Diego location. In 2017, SeaWorld San Diego will replace the killer whale show with a new performance that will “be focused more on the natural setting, natural environment, and also the natural behaviors of the whale,” Manby said. “It will have a strong conservation message.” Although the whales will still be kept in captivity and forced to perform, many animal rights activists saw this as a small victory, a sign that SeaWorld was feeling a hit in profits due to greater public awareness of their alleged treatment of captive cetaceans, largely driven by the documentary Blackfish. “This is the first time that I’m aware of that SeaWorld has ever done anything that is even indirectly an acknowledgement that what they were doing was the wrong thing,” said Dr. Naomi Rose, a marine mammal biologist and advocate for orca welfare at the Animal Welfare Institute. “This is one of the biggest manifestations of the Blackfish effect.” The term “Blackfish effect” has been used colloquially for the last two years to describe the apparent backlash SeaWorld faced after the documentary debuted in 2013. The film told the story of the death of SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau, who was killed by Tilikum, a captive killer whale, in 2010. Blackfish criticized SeaWorld’s history and treatment of captive marine mammals, causing a rather widespread public outcry. Movie scenes set at SeaWorld were cut. Bands cancelled shows at the amusement park. And, most poignantly, SeaWorld was hit where it hurts: its bottom line. SeaWorld revenues, attendance, and stock prices have been on the decline since the film’s release. In Monday’s presentation, SeaWorld told investors it had generated $1.368 billion in revenue to date for 2015. In 2014, revenue totaled $1.378 billion, down from $1.460 billion in 2013, according to SeaWorld’s annual report last year. Attendance also dropped from 24.4 million guests in 2012 to 22.4 million so far this year, and its stock hasn’t been able to recover from a nosedive it took in mid-2014. It’s impossible to know for sure how much of this is can be attributed to Blackfish, but even SeaWorld admits that public outcry and pressure from legislators contributed to the slump. In its most recent quarterly report, SeaWorld lists a number of factors that can have a negative effect on the business, but “incidents or adverse publicity concerning our theme parks,” “changes in federal and state regulations governing the treatment of animals,” and “featuring animals at our theme parks,” are near the top. And the change in the orca shows is a sign, too. The decision wasn’t made in a vacuum, Manby said. “The main point is we are listening to our guests,” Manby said before revealing the changes. “We’re evolving as a company.” This evolution isn’t anywhere near what activists want, which is to see the park retire its marine mammals and end its captive breeding program entirely. But rather than a step towards that goal, it’s likely this decision has more to do with the fact that orcas remain one of the biggest money-makers for SeaWorld. Though the company will not release a breakdown of how much of its business is driven by the killer whales, there are signs that the whales are still a major profit-driver for the parks. Orcas are prominently featured in SeaWorld’s branding, and are an attraction the company seems very unwilling to do away with. “Just from a stark, economic point of view, as long as the cost of keeping the whales is below the cost of losing the whales, then they’ll keep the whales,” said Martin Lewison, a business professor at Farmingdale State College who specializes in theme parks and amusement parks. In other words: even with the apparent backlash of Blackfish, there are still a lot of people paying admission to SeaWorld just to see the whales. Enough that it’s most likely still more profitable for SeaWorld to keep the animals than to retire them. Lewison said it’s also noteworthy that SeaWorld isn’t changing its orca shows in any location other than San Diego, where it has arguably been under more pressure both from activists and legislators. “There are lots of very successful theme parks that don’t have killer whales,” Lewison said. “But the whole raison d’être of SeaWorld is that you have an ocean life theme, and it’s been a very successful proven formula. I don’t envy top management’s position at all. They’re really between a rock and a hard place.” Activists would like to see a SeaWorld without Shamu, one that focuses on rides and education rather than spectacle. But if SeaWorld’s actions are any indication, the killer whales are still one of the biggest revenue generators for the company. Until the public pressure is cranked enough that it’s more profitable to retire than animals than keep them—or laws force the company’s hand—SeaWorld isn’t likely to adopt major changes. Clarification: the lede to this story originally made reference to trainers performing in the water with whales. This was banned in 2014. The lede has been changed for clarity.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Colleges with the Best Mechanic Degree Programs in the nation have been ranked for 2016-2017 by the Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org). As a leading higher education information and resource provider, the site analyzed data from thousands of colleges across the U.S. to determine the list of top 50 two-year schools and top 50 four-year schools. Highest marks came in for Idaho State University, Montana State University Northern, South Seattle College, Lake Washington Institute of Technology and Midland College among four-year schools; Western Wyoming Community College, Texas State Technical College Waco, Sinclair College, Hinds Community College and Augusta Technical College among two-year schools. “The field of automotive service is growing on pace with the national average,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “Schools on this list are offering excellent education programs for up-and-coming service technicians and mechanics, and are also committed to connecting students with job opportunities after graduation.” Colleges must meet several specific requirements to qualify for the Community for Accredited Online Schools’ Best Mechanic Programs list. Each must carry regional accreditation and hold public or private not-for-profit status. Schools are also required to provide career placement or assistance to give students a head start after graduation. More than a dozen additional statistics and data points are compared for each qualifying institution to determine rank on the list, including financial aid offerings, student-teacher ratios and graduation rates. A complete list of schools honored for having the Best Mechanic Programs is included below. For details on the data and methodology used, as well as a complete list of rankings visit: The Best Mechanic Programs at two-year schools for 2016-2017: Arkansas State University - Beebe Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College Ashland Community and Technical College Athens Technical College Atlanta Technical College Augusta Technical College Beaufort County Community College Blue Ridge Community College Bluegrass Community and Technical College Cape Fear Community College Casper College Central Community College Central Georgia Technical College Central Piedmont Community College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Columbus State Community College Dodge City Community College East Mississippi Community College Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Campus Fox Valley Technical College Gadsden State Community College Gateway Community and Technical College Guilford Technical Community College H. Councill Trenholm State Technical College Hinds Community College JF Drake State Community and Technical College Jefferson Community and Technical College Kirtland Community College Lawson State Community College - Birmingham Maysville Community and Technical College Metropolitan Community College North Dakota State College of Science North Georgia Technical College Northshore Technical Community College Northwest Louisiana Technical College Owensboro Community and Technical College Rend Lake College San Juan College Sinclair College Somerset Community College South Georgia Technical College Spokane Community College Texas State Technical College - Waco Wake Technical Community College Washington County Community College Wayne Community College West Kentucky Community and Technical College Western Nebraska Community College Western Wyoming Community College Wilkes Community College The Best Mechanic Programs at four-year schools for 2016-2017: Arkansas Tech University Baker College of Auburn Hills Baker College of Flint Baker College of Port Huron Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology Bismarck State College Brigham Young University - Idaho Broward College College of Southern Nevada Daytona State College Dixie State University Farmingdale State College Ferris State University Florida State College at Jacksonville Idaho State University Indian River State College Jackson College Lake Washington Institute of Technology Lewis-Clark State College Midland College Montana State University-Billings Montana State University-Northern Morrisville State College New England Institute of Technology Northern Michigan University Palm Beach State College Peninsula College Pennsylvania College of Technology Pittsburg State University Ranken Technical College Santa Fe College Seattle Community College - South Campus Seminole State College of Florida Siena Heights University Snow College SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Canton University of Alaska Anchorage University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Alaska Southeast University of Arkansas at Monticello University of Arkansas - Fort Smith University of Central Missouri University of Hawaii Maui College University of Northwestern Ohio Utah Valley University Vermont Technical College Vincennes University Washburn University Weber State University About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A ranking of the top collegiate Vocational & Trade Education Programs in New York has been released by the Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) for 2016-2017. Comparing data on student success and support services, program variety and nearly a dozen other qualitative and quantitative measures, the site highlighted a total of 64 colleges and universities for excellence in trade and vocational education in the state. Top scoring schools include SUNY Canton, Trocaire College, Farmingdale State College, Rochester Institute of Technology, Touro College, Monroe Community College, Niagara County Community College, Mohawk Valley Community College, Tompkins Cortland Community College and SUNY Broome Community College. “U.S. Department of Labor projections show many trade and vocational industries growing at a faster-than-average rate through the year 2024,” said Doug Jones, CEO and Founder of the Community for Accredited Online Schools. “New York provides an excellent learning environment for trade and vocational learners; over five dozen schools in the state are on our list for providing a top-quality education and a jump-start to a job with career placement and other success support programs.” The Community for Accredited Online Schools sets strict criteria for their rankings. Schools must qualify for the list by being regionally accredited, public or private not-for-profit entities. For the Best Trade & Vocational Education Programs in New York list, the site also required schools offer career placement and counseling services to students. All qualifying schools are scored and ranked based on additional school-specific data, such as student-teacher ratios and financial aid offerings. For more details on the data and methodology used to determine the Best Trade & Vocational Education Programs in New York, and to view a complete list of schools and scores, visit: Two-year schools recognized on the Best Trade & Vocational Education in New York, 2016-2017 list: Bramson ORT College Bronx Community College Cayuga County Community College Columbia-Greene Community College Corning Community College CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College CUNY LaGuardia Community College Dutchess Community College Erie Community College Finger Lakes Community College Fulton-Montgomery Community College Genesee Community College Herkimer County Community College Hostos Community College Hudson Valley Community College Jamestown Community College Jefferson Community College Jefferson Lewis BOCES - Practical Nursing Program Kingsborough Community College Memorial Hospital School of Radiation Therapy Technology Mohawk Valley Community College Monroe Community College Nassau Community College Niagara County Community College Onondaga Community College Professional Business College Queensborough Community College Rockland Community College Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing Schenectady County Community College Suffolk County Community College SUNY Broome Community College SUNY Orange SUNY Sullivan SUNY Ulster SUNY Westchester Community College Tompkins Cortland Community College Four-year schools recognized on the Best Trade & Vocational Education in New York, 2016-2017 list: College of Staten Island CUNY Culinary Institute of America CUNY Medgar Evers College CUNY New York City College of Technology Daemen College Farmingdale State College Hilbert College LIU Post Maria College Marist College Medaille College Mercy College Molloy College Morrisville State College New York Institute of Technology New York University Pace University - New York Paul Smiths College of Arts and Science Pratt Institute - Main Rochester Institute of Technology SUNY College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill SUNY College of Technology at Alfred SUNY College of Technology at Canton SUNY College of Technology at Delhi Touro College Trocaire College Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology Villa Maria College About Us: The Community for Accredited Online Schools (AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org) was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: phys.org

"College campus cafeterias generate a large amount of food waste and some universities are making efforts to capture and compost food waste," said corresponding author Tina Waliczek. "Creating an atmosphere where students are able to actively engage in the maintenance of their campus community and environment is one way to begin educating and introducing the concept of separating food waste and its environmental impacts on university and college campuses." Waliczek and coauthors Amy McFarland and Megan Holmes surveyed undergraduate and graduate students at two public state universities to determine students' environmental attitudes, environmental locus of control, composting habits, and knowledge of the composting process. Surveys were administered at Texas State University (San Marcos), a campus with an active composting program, and Farmingdale State College State University of New York (Farmingdale), where there is no composting program on campus. Analyses showed a statistically significant difference between the school with a composting program and the school without a composting program on students' environmental attitudes, environmental locus of control, and composting knowledge. "Mean scores were higher for the school with a composting program (14.69) when compared with mean scores for the school without a composting program (13.67), Waliczek noted. "This finding was expected since students at the school with the composting program had more exposure to educational materials regarding compost." An increase in knowledge about compost was associated with a more internal locus of control, an indicator that an individual believes their actions will have a direct influence on outcomes. The authors noted that understanding environmental locus of control in college students is important because today's students will ultimately be affected by and challenged to provide solutions to future environmental problems. Results of the study showed that "passive" education efforts such as the use of signage, booths, and bins, appeared to be effective in relaying messages about composting to university students. "The hope is that by increasing educational efforts, students will develop more positive attitudes, which will lead to more positive environmental actions," the researchers said.


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Students with access to campus composting program know more about composting, report higher environmental awareness than peers at non-composting campus SAN MARCOS, TX - As food waste becomes a growing concern on college campuses, colleges and universities across the US are introducing integrated composting programs to collect food waste while educating students about environmental stewardship. A new study shows that campus composting programs can be effective in raising students' awareness of composting and environmental issues. "College campus cafeterias generate a large amount of food waste and some universities are making efforts to capture and compost food waste," said corresponding author Tina Waliczek. "Creating an atmosphere where students are able to actively engage in the maintenance of their campus community and environment is one way to begin educating and introducing the concept of separating food waste and its environmental impacts on university and college campuses." Waliczek and coauthors Amy McFarland and Megan Holmes surveyed undergraduate and graduate students at two public state universities to determine students' environmental attitudes, environmental locus of control, composting habits, and knowledge of the composting process. Surveys were administered at Texas State University (San Marcos), a campus with an active composting program, and Farmingdale State College State University of New York (Farmingdale), where there is no composting program on campus. Analyses showed a statistically significant difference between the school with a composting program and the school without a composting program on students' environmental attitudes, environmental locus of control, and composting knowledge. "Mean scores were higher for the school with a composting program (14.69) when compared with mean scores for the school without a composting program (13.67), Waliczek noted. "This finding was expected since students at the school with the composting program had more exposure to educational materials regarding compost." An increase in knowledge about compost was associated with a more internal locus of control, an indicator that an individual believes their actions will have a direct influence on outcomes. The authors noted that understanding environmental locus of control in college students is important because today's students will ultimately be affected by and challenged to provide solutions to future environmental problems. Results of the study showed that "passive" education efforts such as the use of signage, booths, and bins, appeared to be effective in relaying messages about composting to university students. "The hope is that by increasing educational efforts, students will develop more positive attitudes, which will lead to more positive environmental actions," the researchers said. The complete study and abstract are available on the ASHS HortTechnology electronic journal web site: http://horttech. Founded in 1903, the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) is the largest organization dedicated to advancing all facets of horticultural research, education, and application. More information at ashs.org


South Nassau Communities Hospital Names, Dedicates Medical Library in Honor of Former Medical Staff President Dr. Singh joined South Nassau in 1977, and from that year onward he was a dependable, wise source of leadership, demonstrating a zeal for medical innovation centered on patient-centered care. Oceanside, NY, February 17, 2017 --( So it was appropriate that on Friday, February 10 at South Nassau Communities Hospital in Oceanside, NY, family, friends, physicians, hospital staff and board members joined together to celebrate the naming and dedication of the hospital's medical library in honor of Harbhajan Singh, MD. While patients remember Dr. Singh, a pulmonologist, for his compassionate, expert medical care, his peers and staff who worked side-by-side with him at South Nassau for more than half of his 52-year career in medicine, attest that they were inspired by his steadfast pursuit to learn more and to understand more and to put that knowledge to work to raise the quality and standard of medical care that he provided his patients. "When we look at the history and growth of South Nassau Communities Hospital, they are indelibly marked with Dr. Singh's passion for patient-centered medicine and devotion to the hospital's mission and vision," said Richard J. Murphy, President & CEO. "On behalf of South Nassau physicians, staff and board members past, present and future, I salute Dr. Singh for his exemplary career in medicine. It is our honor that we now call this the Harbhajan Singh, MD, Medical Library. " Dr. Singh joined South Nassau in 1977, and from that year onward he was a dependable, wise source of leadership, demonstrating a zeal for medical innovation centered on patient-centered care. During his more than 30 years at South Nassau, Dr. Singh held staff appointments as President of the Medical Staff, Chief of Pulmonary Medicine, Director of the Respiratory Therapy Department, and Chairman of the Respiratory Therapy Committee, among many others. Through those appointments Dr. Singh mentored numerous staff physicians and served as a catalyst behind South Nassau's growth and expansion, which continues today. During his tenure as medical staff president, South Nassau completed an expansion of its Ambulatory Surgery Unit (ASU) to include 10 private patient suites and an enlarged holding area; established an Outpatient Dialysis Center with 18 patient suites; introduced advancements in medical technology including the multislice CT scanner; a 3-D diagnostic imaging system to locate and cure rapid heartbeats; and MicroEndoscopic Discectomy, a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to correct disabling spinal disc problems. A native of India, Dr. Singh began his distinguished career in medicine upon graduating from Amristar Medical College in 1963, (working as an internist in New Delhi). In 1968, he migrated to the United States, with his wife Naginder and they settled in Rockville Centre. While she raised their sons, Charnjit (C.J.) and Sarbjit, Dr. Singh completed residency training in internal medicine and a fellowship in pulmonary medicine, soon thereafter he opened a medical office on Merrick Rd. and then Hempstead Ave. in Lynbrook, providing specialized care in pulmonary and internal medicine. He was board certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Critical Care Medicine and Sleep Medicine. Inspired by his father's love for medicine and the compassionate care that he provided his patients, son C.J. chose a career in medicine as well. He has been an attending physician at South Nassau specializing in gastroenterology for almost 2 decades. Sarbjit is a tenured professor at Farmingdale State College in Sports Business. Naginder has worked in an array of volunteer capacities for South Nassau. "The naming and dedication of the medical library in Dr. Singh's honor will serve as a constant reminder of his commitment to lifelong learning and of his leadership to build on the hospital's tradition of excellence in health care," said Adhi Sharma, MD, chief medical officer. The Harbhajan Singh, MD Medical Library offers a collection of books, journals (both print and online), and access to clinical databases. The library's mission is to meet the ongoing information needs of physicians and other clinical staff in support of patient care, teaching, learning, and research. Oceanside, NY, February 17, 2017 --( PR.com )-- A library is a reflection of the passion for lifelong learning, the search for answers and when either or both are attained, the reward of knowledge, understanding and discernment that is to the benefit of the individual as well as those served by the individual.So it was appropriate that on Friday, February 10 at South Nassau Communities Hospital in Oceanside, NY, family, friends, physicians, hospital staff and board members joined together to celebrate the naming and dedication of the hospital's medical library in honor of Harbhajan Singh, MD.While patients remember Dr. Singh, a pulmonologist, for his compassionate, expert medical care, his peers and staff who worked side-by-side with him at South Nassau for more than half of his 52-year career in medicine, attest that they were inspired by his steadfast pursuit to learn more and to understand more and to put that knowledge to work to raise the quality and standard of medical care that he provided his patients."When we look at the history and growth of South Nassau Communities Hospital, they are indelibly marked with Dr. Singh's passion for patient-centered medicine and devotion to the hospital's mission and vision," said Richard J. Murphy, President & CEO. "On behalf of South Nassau physicians, staff and board members past, present and future, I salute Dr. Singh for his exemplary career in medicine. It is our honor that we now call this the Harbhajan Singh, MD, Medical Library. "Dr. Singh joined South Nassau in 1977, and from that year onward he was a dependable, wise source of leadership, demonstrating a zeal for medical innovation centered on patient-centered care. During his more than 30 years at South Nassau, Dr. Singh held staff appointments as President of the Medical Staff, Chief of Pulmonary Medicine, Director of the Respiratory Therapy Department, and Chairman of the Respiratory Therapy Committee, among many others. Through those appointments Dr. Singh mentored numerous staff physicians and served as a catalyst behind South Nassau's growth and expansion, which continues today.During his tenure as medical staff president, South Nassau completed an expansion of its Ambulatory Surgery Unit (ASU) to include 10 private patient suites and an enlarged holding area; established an Outpatient Dialysis Center with 18 patient suites; introduced advancements in medical technology including the multislice CT scanner; a 3-D diagnostic imaging system to locate and cure rapid heartbeats; and MicroEndoscopic Discectomy, a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to correct disabling spinal disc problems.A native of India, Dr. Singh began his distinguished career in medicine upon graduating from Amristar Medical College in 1963, (working as an internist in New Delhi). In 1968, he migrated to the United States, with his wife Naginder and they settled in Rockville Centre. While she raised their sons, Charnjit (C.J.) and Sarbjit, Dr. Singh completed residency training in internal medicine and a fellowship in pulmonary medicine, soon thereafter he opened a medical office on Merrick Rd. and then Hempstead Ave. in Lynbrook, providing specialized care in pulmonary and internal medicine. He was board certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine, Critical Care Medicine and Sleep Medicine.Inspired by his father's love for medicine and the compassionate care that he provided his patients, son C.J. chose a career in medicine as well. He has been an attending physician at South Nassau specializing in gastroenterology for almost 2 decades. Sarbjit is a tenured professor at Farmingdale State College in Sports Business. Naginder has worked in an array of volunteer capacities for South Nassau."The naming and dedication of the medical library in Dr. Singh's honor will serve as a constant reminder of his commitment to lifelong learning and of his leadership to build on the hospital's tradition of excellence in health care," said Adhi Sharma, MD, chief medical officer.The Harbhajan Singh, MD Medical Library offers a collection of books, journals (both print and online), and access to clinical databases. The library's mission is to meet the ongoing information needs of physicians and other clinical staff in support of patient care, teaching, learning, and research. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from South Nassau Communities Hospital

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