Farm Africa

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Farm Africa

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"I'm truly excited that Strand Equity Partners and Leonardo have joined the HIPPEAS family. As the brand continues to grow with such momentum in the marketplace, it's incredible to bring on board partners who align with our vision and values as a company. We are very enthusiastic to be sharing in this journey with them," says Bisterzo. "HIPPEAS is a high-growth and differentiated brand that has been created in a short amount of time," said Seth Rodsky, Managing Partner of Strand Equity Partners. "The unprecedented traction the brand has achieved is a testament to its unique offering that combines nutrition with a creative flavor profile.  We look forward to partnering with Livio, and the talented management team at HIPPEAS, to lead the next evolution of 'better for you' snacking." HIPPEAS is a new brand of organic chickpea puffs calling all snackers to #GivePeasAChance and try the new "better for you" snack while also "doing good" for the world. HIPPEAS believes that "tastes good" and "do good" are two philosophies that should go hand in hand – that's why they've partnered with Farm Africa, a charity working to end hunger and bring wealth to rural eastern Africa. For each pack sold, the brand will donate a portion of sales to support farmers in eastern Africa to grow themselves out of poverty, helping them build a more prosperous life for themselves and their families. HIPPEAS is currently sold in over 20,000 stores in the US and UK with customers including Starbucks, Whole Foods, Wegmans, Albertson's, Safeway, Boots, Waitrose, Amazon.com and more. Light and crunchy with a serious punch of protein and fiber, HIPPEAS are low-calorie, certified organic, certified gluten-free, vegan, kosher and non-GMO. With three grams of fiber and four grams of protein per single-serve, one-ounce bag, HIPPEAS are the new go-to snack choice for consumers who demand tasty snacks made with high-quality ingredients. About HIPPEAS™ Light and crunchy with a serious punch of protein and fiber, HIPPEAS™ are low-calorie, certified organic, certified gluten-free, vegan, kosher and non-GMO. With 3 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein per single-serve, 1-ouncebag, HIPPEAS™ are the new go-to snack choice for consumers who demand tasty snacks made with high-quality ingredients. HIPPEAS™ are available in five far out flavors: Vegan White Cheddar, Sriracha Sunshine, Far Out Fajita, Pepper Power,and Bohemian Barbecue. About Strand Equity Partners Strand Equity Partners ("Strand") is a leading growth equity fund focused on making investments in emerging and dynamic consumer brands. Strand adds value to its portfolio companies through its marketing and operational expertise as well as its extensive network of industry relationships. Strand investments include Artsy, Chop't, Dos Toros, Revive Kombucha, Sweaty Betty, Thom Browne, Vita Coco, WTRMLN WTR and Bai Brands, which recently sold to Dr Pepper Snapple Group for $1.7Bn, to name a few. About Leonardo DiCaprio Leonardo DiCaprio is an Academy Award-winning actor, producer, and activist. He founded the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation in 1998 for biodiversity and habitat conservation, and climate change solutions. He is as a UN Messenger of Peace for Climate, and a recipient of the Clinton Global Citizen Award and the World Economic Forum Crystal Award. DiCaprio serves on the boards of World Wildlife Fund, Natural Resources Defense Council, National Geographic's Pristine Seas, Oceans 5, and International Fund for Animal Welfare To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hippeas-announces-new-investors-300461842.html


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

HIPPEAS CEO and Co-Founder Livio Bisterzo confirmed today that Strand Equity Partners, a leading growth equity fund co-founded by Seth Rodsky, and Leonardo DiCaprio have invested in the company. They join ex barkTHINS EVP and current General Manager of HIPPEAS, Joe Serventi, who recently invested in the chickpea snack. "I'm truly excited that Strand Equity Partners and Leonardo have joined the HIPPEAS family. As the brand continues to grow with such momentum in the marketplace, it's incredible to bring on board partners who align with our vision and values as a company. We are very enthusiastic to be sharing in this journey with them," says Bisterzo. "HIPPEAS is a high-growth and differentiated brand that has been created in a short amount of time," said Seth Rodsky, Managing Partner of Strand Equity Partners. "The unprecedented traction the brand has achieved is a testament to its unique offering that combines nutrition with a creative flavor profile.  We look forward to partnering with Livio, and the talented management team at HIPPEAS, to lead the next evolution of 'better for you' snacking." HIPPEAS is a new brand of organic chickpea puffs calling all snackers to #GivePeasAChance and try the new "better for you" snack while also "doing good" for the world. HIPPEAS believes that "tastes good" and "do good" are two philosophies that should go hand in hand – that's why they've partnered with Farm Africa, a charity working to end hunger and bring wealth to rural eastern Africa. For each pack sold, the brand will donate a portion of sales to support farmers in eastern Africa to grow themselves out of poverty, helping them build a more prosperous life for themselves and their families. HIPPEAS is currently sold in over 20,000 stores in the US and UK with customers including Starbucks, Whole Foods, Wegmans, Albertson's, Safeway, Boots, Waitrose, Amazon.com and more. Light and crunchy with a serious punch of protein and fiber, HIPPEAS are low-calorie, certified organic, certified gluten-free, vegan, kosher and non-GMO. With three grams of fiber and four grams of protein per single-serve, one-ounce bag, HIPPEAS are the new go-to snack choice for consumers who demand tasty snacks made with high-quality ingredients. About HIPPEAS™ Light and crunchy with a serious punch of protein and fiber, HIPPEAS™ are low-calorie, certified organic, certified gluten-free, vegan, kosher and non-GMO. With 3 grams of fiber and 4 grams of protein per single-serve, 1-ouncebag, HIPPEAS™ are the new go-to snack choice for consumers who demand tasty snacks made with high-quality ingredients. HIPPEAS™ are available in five far out flavors: Vegan White Cheddar, Sriracha Sunshine, Far Out Fajita, Pepper Power,and Bohemian Barbecue. About Strand Equity Partners Strand Equity Partners ("Strand") is a leading growth equity fund focused on making investments in emerging and dynamic consumer brands. Strand adds value to its portfolio companies through its marketing and operational expertise as well as its extensive network of industry relationships. Strand investments include Artsy, Chop't, Dos Toros, Revive Kombucha, Sweaty Betty, Thom Browne, Vita Coco, WTRMLN WTR and Bai Brands, which recently sold to Dr Pepper Snapple Group for $1.7Bn, to name a few. About Leonardo DiCaprio Leonardo DiCaprio is an Academy Award-winning actor, producer, and activist. He founded the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation in 1998 for biodiversity and habitat conservation, and climate change solutions. He is as a UN Messenger of Peace for Climate, and a recipient of the Clinton Global Citizen Award and the World Economic Forum Crystal Award. DiCaprio serves on the boards of World Wildlife Fund, Natural Resources Defense Council, National Geographic's Pristine Seas, Oceans 5, and International Fund for Animal Welfare.


Peacock C.,FARM Africa | Sherman D.M.,Dutch Committee for Afghanistan
Small Ruminant Research | Year: 2010

The multi-dimensional nature of 'sustainability' including survival, resilience and efficiency is described as are the environmental, economic and social factors that underpin sustainability. Some of the current global trends and forces of change that impinge on goat production in the 21st century are also considered. The characteristics of some of the main goat systems and the people who keep them are described and the impact of some global trends (climate change, rising prices of food and fuel, environmental degradation, genetic erosion, dietary and lifestyle changes, social inequality and global insecurity) on the sustainability of goat production are considered. A 'sustainability scorecard' is developed as a tool to assess the ability of goat production systems to survive current trends and future shocks. Some case studies are presented from Africa, Afghanistan and the UK, including the pastoral systems of East Africa, emerging smallholder dairy systems in Africa, cashmere goat production in Afghanistan and a highly intensive niche dairy enterprise in the UK. The sustainability scorecard is applied to assess each system. Finally, conclusions are drawn about how to make goat systems more sustainable and resilient to the challenges they currently face and how goat keepers need to constantly adapt to changing circumstances in order to survive. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Peacock C.,FARM Africa | Ahuya C.O.,Farm Africa Dairy Goat and Animal Healthcare Project | Ojango J.M.K.,Kenya International Livestock Research Institute | Okeyo A.M.,Kenya International Livestock Research Institute
Livestock Science | Year: 2011

Successful livestock improvement programmes focusing on low-input smallholder production systems though rare, are possible using community-based approaches. This paper outlines important design and implementation components of a goat improvement programme undertaken by FARM Africa in the eastern highlands of Kenya. Through strong capacity building initiatives at grass-roots level, producers were empowered to undertake a goat genetic improvement programme that benefitted them in several ways. This resulted in the farmers forming their own umbrella organizations to cater for their interests as producers in accessing animal health and breeding services, production inputs, and marketing goats and goat products. In seven years, the population of improved goats in one of the project areas increased from 2100 to 5500, and the livelihoods of the participating farmers improved. Income from sales of milk and improved breeding and slaughter stock increased, while food security improved as a result of daily milk consumption and improved crop yields resulting from use of the rich goat manure. The project has, however, faced challenges arising mainly from the popularity of the improved goats within the Eastern Africa region, which has resulted in sale of a large number of the young animals, leaving few replacements within the project area. Uptake of goat breeding by private commercial farmers to provide breeding stock and replacement animals is currently lacking. Further research and evaluation is required on how to strengthen collective-action based institutions to improve services within smallholder farmer communities. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

Join us for an online debate on November 22nd 1-2pm (GMT) about the role of multinational companies in Africa’s agri-food sector 2.28pm GMT If you enjoyed this debate please watch out for our public debate on this same theme, taking place on December 7th. Related: Is big business a force for good for African farmers? - event 2.14pm GMT "Inclusive business" as you describe it, meaning linking low-income communities to the supply chains of large multi-nationals, has nothing new. Once again, multinationals have sourced their product from low-income communities for years and years but often with an absence of traceability. Most of the commodities are traded by major traders and the whole supply chain management has been outsourced for years by the food industry. Today, a Unilever or a Mondelez would never import directly some tea or some cocoa. There was a big change of business model years ago where the food industry decided to focus on marketing and distribution and to outsource the supply chain management to traders because it was too much hassle. "Inclusive business" is just the acknowledgement that the outsourcing on supply chain management has been pushed too far and that multinationals need to understand what's going on on their supply chains. But once again, the cocoa and the coffee sourced by multinationals in Africa has always been produced by smallholder farmers, nothing new there...Inclusive business works. We have seen cases where smallholders are benefiting from inclusive agribusiness - for example rice farmers in Nigeria working with Olam as out growers have increased incomes and knowledge. They have also gained access to technologies, finance and markets thus benefiting from such relationships. Its also a similar case with the horticulture sector in Kenya and Ethiopia.Yes! We've enabled farmers to enter markets, improve their productivity within stable environments, and the impact we've seen considerably improves their livelihoods, often doubling income. This has a corresponding benefit within the local community. Related: Big brands like Unilever aren't the answer to helping Africa's farmers I think that the challenges that Bill Vorley and others set out are very real, and inclusion does need to be approached more inclusively. We are seeing many NGOs rising to the challenge of working with the formal and informal economy to seek to better equip smallholder farmer communities to engage with the growing number of domestic and regional market opportunities in sub-Saharan Africa. Small Foundation supported the Mandaleo Agricultural Enterprise Fund run by Farm Africa, and is currently supporting Access to Capital for Rural Enterprises, a consortium of NGOs seeking to develop rural business concepts from their programmes, for example.I should also mention that we are also seeing innovative for-profit vehicles for addressing the needs of early-stage agricultural businesses in a number of African economies. These include H2O Venture Partners in Rwanda and MBC Africa in Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire.Inclusive business -- 'shared value' is a term that describes objectives in that direction, it seems to me. There is a growing number of good examples where smallholder communities have been linked to modern food supply chains in domestic as well as export markets. But much more can be done (and will in the future, because the demand for food is up, globally, which creates evolving new opportunities to source from small farmers). Links to markets are fundamental for these farmers -- just ask them; we speak with hundreds of (small) farmers in Africa and Asia every year and there are recurring themes, of which 'links to markets' is perhaps the most important one. MF Continue reading...


Lemenih M.,Farm Africa | Kassa H.,Center for International Forestry Research
Forests | Year: 2014

In Ethiopia, deforestation rates remain high and the gap between demand and domestic supply of forest products is expanding, even though government-initiated re-greening efforts began over a century ago. Today, over 3 million hectares (ha) of degraded forest land are under area exclosure; smallholder plantations cover 0.8 million ha; and state-owned industrial plantations stagnate at under 0.25 million ha. This review captures experiences related to re-greening practices in Ethiopia, specifically with regards to area exclosure and afforestation and reforestation, and distills lessons regarding processes, achievements and challenges. The findings show that farmers and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are the main players, and that the private sector has so far played only a small role. The role of the government was mixed: supportive in some cases and hindering in others. The challenges of state- and NGO-led re-greening practices are: inadequate involvement of communities; poorly defined rehabilitation objectives; lack of management plans; unclear responsibilities and benefit-sharing arrangements; and poor silvicultural practices. The lessons include: a more active role for non-state actors in re-greening initiatives; more attention to market signals; devolution of management responsibility; clear definition of responsibilities and benefit-sharing arrangements; and better tenure security, which are all major factors to success. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Bedada W.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences | Lemenih M.,Farm Africa | Karltun E.,Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment | Year: 2016

Decline in farmland soil fertility due to nutrient depletion is a concern for smallholder farmers in the highlands of Ethiopia. In this study we tested if long-term addition of compost, either alone or in combination with nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) fertilizer, affected available soil nutrient status, grain/tuber harvests, agronomic N use efficiency, and plot level N and P nutrient balances. The on-farm experiments were conducted on four farm fields for up to 6 years in Beseku, Ethiopia. A randomized complete block design was used, with four treatments: full dose of compost applied alone at 2.4 tha-1 DW organic matter (C); full dose of fertilizer (F); half compost and half fertilizer (CF); and, unfertilized control. In the upper 10cm of the surface soil, several Mehlich-3 extractable nutrients (B, Ca, K, Mg, P, S, and Zn) had significantly higher concentrations in the C treatment (P<0.01), and some in the CF treatment (P<0.05) than in the control. Phosphorus was the only nutrient with a higher concentration in the F treatment than the control. Maize and faba bean showed added benefits (synergy) in terms of yield increase in the CF treatment and a better agronomic efficiency for added N. Plot level N balances were negative for all treatments except C, with strong depletion in the control (-76 kg N ha-1yr-1) and F (-65 kg N ha-1yr-1) treatments. When the N balance was compared to measured change in soil N, the F and control treatments were significantly (P<0.05) lower than zero. N in the CF and C treatments was close to steady-state, i.e., the input of N in organic matter compensated for the loss of N through mineralization. The control treatment had a negative P balance of 11kgPha-1yr-1, with moderately negative balance of 4 kg P ha-1yr-1 in the C treatment. The CF and F treatments had positive P balances. Thus, the addition of compost, both alone or in combination with mineral fertilizer, can prevent N and reduce P mining and improve the nutrient status of the soil. When only NP fertilizer was used, the crop utilized all N that was mineralized indicating that the crop was N limited. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Muhanji G.,FARM Africa
Appropriate Technology | Year: 2010

FARM-Africa's Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) introduced a three-year oyster mushroom project to smallholder Chagga farmers in Hai and Siha districts in the Kilimanjaro region of Tanzania in 2005. The project was implemented with the help of the Horticultural Research Institute (HORTI)- Tengeru, and it was the Institute, in 2007 and 2008, who guided the project to improve the access to profitable markets with additional financial assistance from FARM-Africa. Many farmers in Hai District have small farms so mushroom growing is appropriate. The mushrooms are grown on a substrate made from crop residues like banana leaves, maize husks and rice straw. Many women have taken a lead in the business, and have found that they are no longer dependent on their husbands for money for some basic household goods. The medicinal benefits are acknowledged by experts. Nancy Kaaya, HORTI-Tengeru, noted that mushrooms have the capability to raise immunity levels. The mixture is put inside plastic bags, which are placed in specially constructed dark and humid sheds, which are simple structures made of local materials and thatched roofs.


Muhanji G.,FARM Africa
Appropriate Technology | Year: 2010

Farm Africa's Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) introduced upland rice farming in a three-year funded project, implemented by A2N in 2007. When A2N started implementing the project, they organized the farmers into groups. Initially, 3000 farmers in 100 groups, but as the project comes to an end, a total of 3195 farmers have been organized into 103 groups. To achieve sustainable outputs, A2N adopted a collaborative approach, providing extension services and linking farmers to critical partners such as input sellers. FICA, an agro-seed supplier was brought on board to ensure that the right seed was delivered to farmers because if one does not get the right planting materials you end up with nothing. They provide an alternative outlet in case the other market players fail to purchase the produce. The company was also able to offer farmers the option of either milling or branding and packaging their own produce for the market.


Mukanji G.,FARM Africa
Appropriate Technology | Year: 2010

Farmers in Masai District of Southern Tanzania are making use of the Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) to boost their organic cashew nuts production. Regina Hamisi is a farmer who has the roles of training other farmers as an extension officer as well as a secretary of her Mpindimbi group in Masasi District. OLAM is the main cashew processing plant and exporting company in Mtwara. The nuts she delivers are organically grown and farmers are paid Tsh.1000/kg compared to Tsh.250-600/kg for normal varieties. Four years ago, Regina and other cashew farmers in Masasi were pessimistic about the crop. Machiel Spuij says MATF has helped the Masasi farmers expand by making access to inputs and marketing much easier within the existing cooperative societies which until then enjoyed near exclusive rights over the cashew business.

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