FAO NWFP

Yaoundé, Cameroon
Yaoundé, Cameroon

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Tieguhong J.C.,Bioversity International | Ndoye O.,FAO NWFP | Grouwels S.,FAO | Mala W.A.,SNV | Betti J.L.,University of Douala
International Forestry Review | Year: 2012

Using the Market Analysis and Development approach to generate the results presented in this paper, it was found that rural communities prefer certain NWFP for increasing their incomes in central Africa. Four enterprise development factors including market/economic, social, environmental and technological considerations were useful criteria for the NWFP selection process. 14 local non-governmental organisations were trained on enterprise development modules that further trained 233 groups with a total membership of 3515 people in 87 villages. Significant variation was observed between countries in terms of total membership and the number of women engaged per group. It was suggested that the promotion of NWFPs through small-scale enterprise development could form an important entry point for poverty alleviation and food security in Central African villages.


Tieguhong J.C.,Bioversity International | Ingram V.,Agricultural Economics Institute LEI | Mala W.A.,University of Yaounde I | Ndoye O.,FAO NWFP | Grouwels S.,FAO
Forest Policy and Economics | Year: 2015

Non-timber forest products (NTFP) comprise a diversity of natural resources that support livelihoods of those along the chain from harvester to traders. The Central African Forest Commission (COMIFAC) recognises the importance of NTFPs in alleviating poverty and conserving biodiversity and has proposed directives to aid member states to implement appropriate regulations. Data on the regulations governing the chain and its impacts were collected from literature, 12 small and medium enterprises trading an NTFP known as okok (Gnetum spp.) from the production forests to the port of export in Cameroon, and workshops. Laws were bureaucratically, arbitrarily and weakly implemented and enforced. Of 18,368 financial transactions recorded, 81% were bribes, comprising 34% of trader's costs. Corruption in the permit system further creates high transaction costs, negative environmental impacts due to illegal and over-exploitation, and reduces government revenues. The regulatory framework does not promote an enabling business environment. Improvements in governance are imperative if the economic impact upon the livelihoods of thousands of people in the chain is to be maintained and enhanced to ensure sustainable trade. Recommendations to improve the sector in Cameroon include revisions in the regulatory framework and its implementation to increase transparency and counter corruption. © 2015.


Tieguhong J.C.,Bioversity International | Ingram V.,Agricultural Economics Institute LEI | Ingram V.,Center for International Forestry Research | Mala W.A.,University of Yaounde I | And 2 more authors.
Forest Policy and Economics | Year: 2015

Non-timber forest products (NTFP) comprise a diversity of natural resources that support livelihoods of those along the chain from harvester to traders. The Central African Forest Commission (COMIFAC) recognises the importance of NTFPs in alleviating poverty and conserving biodiversity and has proposed directives to aid member states to implement appropriate regulations. Data on the regulations governing the chain and its impacts were collected from literature, 12 small and medium enterprises trading an NTFP known as okok (Gnetum spp.) from the production forests to the port of export in Cameroon, and workshops. Laws were bureaucratically, arbitrarily and weakly implemented and enforced. Of 18,368 financial transactions recorded, 81% were bribes, comprising 34% of trader's costs. Corruption in the permit system further creates high transaction costs, negative environmental impacts due to illegal and over-exploitation, and reduces government revenues. The regulatory framework does not promote an enabling business environment. Improvements in governance are imperative if the economic impact upon the livelihoods of thousands of people in the chain is to be maintained and enhanced to ensure sustainable trade. Recommendations to improve the sector in Cameroon include revisions in the regulatory framework and its implementation to increase transparency and counter corruption. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Tieguhong J.C.,FAO NWFP | Grouwels S.,FAO | Ndoye O.,FAO NWFP | Mala A.W.,FAO NWFP | And 3 more authors.
Forest Policy and Economics | Year: 2012

This paper analyses the financing gaps of small and medium forest enterprises (SMFEs) in two countries located in central Africa. Total capital required for the development of 151 pilot enterprises in Cameroon and the Democratic Republic of Congo was evaluated at US$ 1335025 out of which enterprises own contribution was 63% and the remainder was subject to external assistance. There was consistent variation in capital requirements, own contribution and level of assistance sought among the enterprises. The paper recommends the provision of both technical and targeted financial assistance to SMFEs in central Africa. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

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