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Belanger M.,Université de Sherbrooke | Belanger M.,Dieppe Family Medicine Unit | Casey M.,Université de Sherbrooke | Casey M.,Dieppe Family Medicine Unit | And 12 more authors.
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity | Year: 2011

Purpose: Better knowledge on why some individuals succeed in maintaining participation in physical activity throughout adolescence is needed to guide the development of effective interventions to increase and then maintain physical activity levels. Despite allowing an in-depth understanding, qualitative designs have infrequently been used to study physical activity maintenance. We explored factors contributing to the maintenance and the decline of physical activity during adolescence.Methods: Questionnaires were administered to 515 grade 10-12 students. The Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents was used to determine physical activity level at the end of adolescence. An adapted version of this questionnaire was used to estimate physical activity in early adolescence. Among both genders, we identified participants who maintained a high level of physical activity since grade 7 and some whose activity level declined. For each category, groups of 10 students were randomly selected to take part in focus group discussions.Results: Seven focus groups with 5 to 8 participants in each were held. Both maintainers and decliners associated physical activity with positive health outcomes. Maintenance of physical activity was associated with supportive social environments and heightened feelings of competence and attractiveness. A decline in physical activity was associated with negative social validation, poor social support and barriers related to access.Conclusions: Although maintainers and decliners associate physical activity with similar themes, the experiences of both groups differ substantially with regards to those themes. Taking both perspectives in consideration could help improve interventions to increase and maintain physical activity levels of adolescents. © 2011 Bélanger et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Benoit C.,Dieppe Family Medicine Unit | Benoit C.,Université de Sherbrooke | Dumais A.,Dieppe Family Medicine Unit | Dumais A.,Université de Sherbrooke | And 6 more authors.
Pain Medicine (United States) | Year: 2012

Objective. We assessed the effectiveness of regenerative injection therapy (RIT) to relieve pain and restore function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Design. Crossover study where participants were randomly assigned to receive exercise therapy for 32 weeks in combination with RIT on weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12 or RIT on weeks 20, 24, 28, and 32. Patients. Thirty-six patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis. Interventions. RIT, which is made up of injections of 1cc of 15% dextrose 0.6% lidocaine in the collateral ligaments and a 5cc injection of 20% dextrose 0.5% lidocaine inside the knee joint. Outcome Measures. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index of severity of osteoarthrosis symptoms (WOMAC) score (range: 0-96). Results. Following 16 weeks of follow-up, the participants assigned to RIT presented a significant reduction of their osteoarthritis symptoms (mean±standard deviation: -21.8±12.5, P<0.001). WOMAC scores in this group did not change further during the last 16 weeks of follow-up, when the participants received exercise therapy only (-1.2±10.7, P=0.65). WOMAC scores in the first 16 weeks did not change significantly among the participants receiving exercise therapy only during this period (-6.1±13.9, P=0.11). There was a significant decrease in this groups' WOMAC scores during the last 16 weeks when the participants received RIT (-9.3±11.4, P=0.006). After 36 weeks, WOMAC scores improved in both groups by 47.3% and 36.2%. The improvement attributable to RIT alone corresponds to a 11.9-point (or 29.5%) decrease in WOMAC scores. Conclusions. The use of RIT is associated with a marked reduction in symptoms, which was sustained for over 24 weeks. © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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