Kecioren Family Medicine Center

Ankara, Turkey

Kecioren Family Medicine Center

Ankara, Turkey
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Suvak B.,Yuzuncu Yil University | Dulger A.C.,Yuzuncu Yil University | Suvak O.,Kecioren Family Medicine Center | Yesilyurt A.O.,Yuzuncu Yil University | And 2 more authors.
Archives of Medical Science | Year: 2017

Introduction: Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection is a serious health problem leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite evidence that zoonotic infections are associated with end-stage liver disease, brucellosis in patients with delta hepatitis related to liver disease has not been well characterized. So, we examined this relationship using recent hospital-based data. Material and methods: We analyzed data from 96 delta hepatitis patients (mean age: 52.5 ±12.8 years; 50 male; 52 cirrhotics) and 117 (mean age: 50.4 ±7 years; 60 male) control subjects who were selected from patients with splenomegaly. The Brucella Wright test in connection with blood culture was used to detect active Brucella infection. Demographic features, laboratory data, results of ultrasonographic examination of the abdomen and Wright agglutination titers were compared between groups. Results: There were 9 (9%) patients with active brucellosis in delta hepatitis patients. Compared to the control group, there was a statistically significant difference between groups in terms of having active brucellosis (9 vs. 2 patients; p < 0.001). Higher MELD scores were also associated with active Brucella infection (p < 0.005). Conclusions: Patients with chronic hepatitis D related cirrhosis (CHD-C) were at risk of developing brucellosis requiring hospitalization. Higher Wright titers among patients with more advanced liver disease may reflect a unique phenomenon that requires further investigation to determine underlying causative factors. © 2016 Termedia & Banach.


Suvak B.,Yuzuncu Yil University | Dulger A.C.,Yuzuncu Yil University | Suvak O.,Kecioren Family Medicine Center | Aytemiz E.,Yuzuncu Yil University | Kemik O.,Yuzuncu Yil University
Clinics | Year: 2015

OBJECTIVES: Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped, urease-producing bacterium with multiple unipolar flagella. Humans are a major reservoir for H. pylori; however, there are no data on the prevalence of H. pylori among dyspeptic patients who have experienced natural disasters. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of H. pylori in dyspeptic patients who survived a recent natural disaster and to compare the data between the pre-disaster and post-disaster periods. METHODS: Between December 2011 and February 2012 (~ one month following an earthquake), 209 dyspeptic patients who underwent gastroscopy were included in the study. For microorganism identification, gastric biopsy materials from the 209 disaster survivors with dyspeptic complaints were tested for urease activity in a medium containing urea and a pH indicator. The obtained results were compared with pre-disaster data from dyspeptic patients in the same city during the corresponding period of the previous year. Furthermore, the current H. pylori prevalence was evaluated among 139 dyspeptic patients between January 2014 and May 2014. RESULTS: We found a significantly higher prevalence of H. pylori in disaster survivors with dyspepsia compared with dyspeptic patients in the pre-disaster period (p<0.005). Interestingly, the current H. pylori prevalence was found to be significantly higher than the prevalence in both the disaster and pre-disaster periods (p<0.005). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that a recent earthquake could contribute to the development of H. pylori infection in subjects who live in the disaster-stricken area. These data also highlight the exceptionally high H. pylori prevalence in dyspeptic patients. Regional variations require further analyses. © 2015 CLINICS.


PubMed | Yuzuncu Yil University and Kecioren Family Medicine Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinics (Sao Paulo, Brazil) | Year: 2015

Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped, urease-producing bacterium with multiple unipolar flagella. Humans are a major reservoir for H. pylori; however, there are no data on the prevalence of H. pylori among dyspeptic patients who have experienced natural disasters. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of H. pylori in dyspeptic patients who survived a recent natural disaster and to compare the data between the pre-disaster and post-disaster periods.Between December 2011 and February 2012 ( one month following an earthquake), 209 dyspeptic patients who underwent gastroscopy were included in the study. For microorganism identification, gastric biopsy materials from the 209 disaster survivors with dyspeptic complaints were tested for urease activity in a medium containing urea and a pH indicator. The obtained results were compared with pre-disaster data from dyspeptic patients in the same city during the corresponding period of the previous year. Furthermore, the current H. pylori prevalence was evaluated among 139 dyspeptic patients between January 2014 and May 2014.We found a significantly higher prevalence of H. pylori in disaster survivors with dyspepsia compared with dyspeptic patients in the pre-disaster period (p<0.005). Interestingly, the current H. pylori prevalence was found to be significantly higher than the prevalence in both the disaster and pre-disaster periods (p<0.005).These results suggest that a recent earthquake could contribute to the development of H. pylori infection in subjects who live in the disaster-stricken area. These data also highlight the exceptionally high H. pylori prevalence in dyspeptic patients. Regional variations require further analyses.

Loading Kecioren Family Medicine Center collaborators
Loading Kecioren Family Medicine Center collaborators