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Helsinki, Finland

Mahjneh I.,University of Oulu | Jaiswal J.,Center for Genetic Medicine Research | Lamminen A.,University of Helsinki | Somer M.,Family Federation of Finland | And 3 more authors.
Neuromuscular Disorders | Year: 2010

We have been following clinically and with muscle MRI for the past 3-decades a Finnish family with two patients with distal muscular dystrophy. Previously we demonstrated the cellular defect in these patients to be defective membrane repair and more recently have identified the causative gene to be anoctamin 5 (ANO5). The disorder seen in these patients is characterized by onset in the third decade. First symptoms were burning sensation on the calves and later on calf tightness during running. Muscle weakness and wasting were asymmetric and early involving the calf muscles, later spread to the thigh muscles. Biceps brachi was later manifestation. Clinical course was slow. CK levels were high. Muscle biopsy showed dystrophic pattern and multifocal disruption of the sarcolemmal membrane but no subsarcolemmal vesicle accumulation nor active inflammation. We conclude that the disease seen in our cases is a new separate clinical, genetic and histopathologic entity to include within the classification of autosomal recessive distal muscular dystrophies. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. Source


Lehtinen M.,University of Tampere | Paavonen J.,University of Helsinki | Wheeler C.M.,University of New Mexico | Jaisamrarn U.,Chulalongkorn University | And 27 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2012

Background: Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater (CIN2+) is the surrogate endpoint used in licensure trials of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Vaccine efficacy against CIN3+, the immediate precursor to invasive cervical cancer, is more difficult to measure because of its lower incidence, but provides the most stringent evidence of potential cancer prevention. We report vaccine efficacy against CIN3+ and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) in the end-of-study analysis of PATRICIA (PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults). Methods: Healthy women aged 15-25 years with no more than six lifetime sexual partners were included in PATRICIA, irrespective of their baseline HPV DNA status, HPV-16 or HPV-18 serostatus, or cytology. Women were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive an HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine or a control hepatitis A vaccine via an internet-based central randomisation system using a minimisation algorithm to account for age ranges and study sites. The patients and study investigators were masked to allocated vaccine. The primary endpoint of PATRICIA has been reported previously. In the present end-of-study analysis, we focus on CIN3+ and AIS in the populations of most clinical interest, the total vaccinated cohort (TVC) and the TVC-naive. The TVC comprised all women who received at least one vaccine dose, approximating catch-up populations and including sexually active women (vaccine n=9319; control=9325). The TVC-naive comprised women with no evidence of oncogenic HPV infection at baseline, approximating early adolescent HPV exposure (vaccine n=5824; control=5820). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00122681. Findings: Vaccine efficacy against CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was 100% (95% CI 85·5-100) in the TVC-naive and 45·7% (22·9-62·2) in the TVC. Vaccine efficacy against all CIN3+ (irrespective of HPV type in the lesion and including lesions with no HPV DNA detected) was 93·2% (78·9-98·7) in the TVC-naive and 45·6% (28·8-58·7) in the TVC. In the TVC-naive, vaccine efficacy against all CIN3+ was higher than 90% in all age groups. In the TVC, vaccine efficacy against all CIN3+ and CIN3+ associated with HPV-16/18 was highest in the 15-17 year age group and progressively decreased in the 18-20 year and 21-25 year age groups. Vaccine efficacy against all AIS was 100% (31·0-100) and 76·9% (16·0-95·8) in the TVC-naive and TVC, respectively. Serious adverse events occurred in 835 (9·0%) and 829 (8·9%) women in the vaccine and control groups, respectively; only ten events (0·1%) and five events (0·1%), respectively, were considered to be related to vaccination. Interpretation: PATRICIA end-of-study results show excellent vaccine efficacy against CIN3+ and AIS irrespective of HPV DNA in the lesion. Population-based vaccination that incorporates the HPV-16/18 vaccine and high coverage of early adolescents might have the potential to substantially reduce the incidence of cervical cancer. Funding: GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Wheeler C.M.,University of New Mexico | Castellsague X.,CIBER ISCIII | Garland S.M.,Murdoch Childrens Research Institute | Szarewski A.,Queen Mary, University of London | And 23 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2012

Background: We evaluated the efficacy of the human papillomavirus HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types in the end-of-study analysis after 4 years of follow-up in PATRICIA (PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults). Methods: Healthy women aged 15-25 years with no more than six lifetime sexual partners were included in PATRICIA irrespective of their baseline HPV DNA status, HPV-16 or HPV-18 serostatus, or cytology. Women were randomly assigned (1:1) to HPV-16/18 vaccine or a control hepatitis A vaccine, via an internet-based central randomisation system using a minimisation algorithm to account for age ranges and study sites. The study was double-blind. The primary endpoint of PATRICIA has been reported previously; the present analysis evaluates cross-protective vaccine efficacy against non-vaccine oncogenic HPV types in the end-of-study analysis. Analyses were done for three cohorts: the according-to-protocol cohort for efficacy (ATP-E; vaccine n=8067, control n=8047), total vaccinated HPV-naive cohort (TVC-naive; no evidence of infection with 14 oncogenic HPV types at baseline, approximating young adolescents before sexual debut; vaccine n=5824, control n=5820), and the total vaccinated cohort (TVC; all women who received at least one vaccine dose, approximating catch-up populations that include sexually active women; vaccine n=9319, control=9325). Vaccine efficacy was evaluated against 6-month persistent infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater (CIN2+) associated with 12 non-vaccine HPV types (individually or as composite endpoints), and CIN3+ associated with the composite of 12 non-vaccine HPV types. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00122681. Findings: Consistent vaccine efficacy against persistent infection and CIN2+ (with or without HPV-16/18 co-infection) was seen across cohorts for HPV-33, HPV-31, HPV-45, and HPV-51. In the most conservative analysis of vaccine efficacy against CIN2+, where all cases co-infected with HPV-16/18 were removed, vaccine efficacy was noted for HPV-33 in all cohorts, and for HPV-31 in the ATP-E and TVC-naive. Vaccine efficacy against CIN2+ associated with the composite of 12 non-vaccine HPV types (31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68), with or without HPV-16/18 co-infection, was 46·8% (95% CI 30·7-59·4) in the ATP-E, 56·2% (37·2-69·9) in the TVC-naive, and 34·2% (20·4-45·8) in the TVC. Corresponding values for CIN3+ were 73·8% (48·3-87·9), 91·4% (65·0-99·0), and 47·5% (22·8-64·8). Interpretation: Data from the end-of-study analysis of PATRICIA show cross-protective efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against four oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types-HPV-33, HPV-31, HPV-45, and HPV-51-in different trial cohorts representing diverse groups of women. Funding: GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Rana M.M.,University of Tampere | Huhtala H.,University of Tampere | Apter D.,Family Federation of Finland | Eriksson T.,University of Tampere | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2013

Phase III clinical trials of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination have shown ≥95% efficacy against HPV16/18 associated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) Grade 2/3. Long-term surveillance is, however, needed to determine the overall vaccine efficacy (VE) against CIN3 and invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC). During population-based recruitment between September 2002 and March 2003, 1,749 16- to 17-year old Finns participated in a multi-national randomized Phase III HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine (FUTURE II) trial for the determination of VE against HPV16/18 positive CIN2/3. The passive follow-up started at the country-wide, population-based Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) six months after the active follow-up and voluntary cross-vaccination in April 2007. A cluster randomized, population-based reference cohort of 15,744 unvaccinated, originally 18-19 year old Finns was established in two phases in 2003 and 2005 after the FUTURE II recruitment. We linked these cohorts with the FCR in 2007-2011 (HPV vaccine and placebo cohorts) and 2006-2010 and 2008-2012 (unvaccinated reference cohorts 1 and 2) to compare their incidences of CIN3 and ICC. The four years passive follow-up resulted in 3,464, 3,444 and 62,876 person years for the HPV6/11/16/18, original placebo and reference cohorts, after excluding cases discovered during the clinical follow-up and individuals not at risk. The numbers of CIN3 and ICC cases identified were 0 and 0, 3 and 0, 59 and 3 for the HPV6/11/16/18, placebo and the unvaccinated reference cohorts. The corresponding CIN3 incidence rates were 0/100,000 (95% confidence interval 0.0-106.5), 87.1/100,000 (95% CI 17.9-254.5) and 93.8/100,000 (95% CI 71.4-121), respectively. Long-term surveillance up to 8 years (and longer) post vaccination of the HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine and placebo cohorts, and the unvaccinated reference cohort (not exposed to interventions) for the most stringent efficacy end-points by passive cancer registry-based follow-up is feasible. Copyright © 2012 UICC. Source


Makinen S.,Family Federation of Finland | Soderstrom-Anttila V.,Family Federation of Finland | Vainio J.,University of Helsinki | Suikkari A.-M.,Family Federation of Finland | Tuuri T.,Family Federation of Finland
Human Reproduction | Year: 2013

Study Question: Does the length of time during which embryos are cultured in vitro affect the birthweight of the infants? Summary Answer: The duration of the embryo culture period is a significant factor in determining the birthweight of the infants. What is Already Knownivf: children show adverse perinatal outcome when compared with the general population and increased incidence of preterm birth and low birthweight is commonly observed. Study Design , Size, Duration A retrospective cross-sectional cohort study including 1079 infants born after treatment at the Family Federation of Finland Fertility Clinic in Helsinki, between 2000 and 2010. Participants, Setting, Methodsall: singleton IVF children were included. The gestation-and gender-adjusted birthweights of the babies were analyzed according to mother's age, BMI, and parity, type of treatment (IVF or ICSI), main cause of infertility and embryo culture period. Two outcomes were investigated: the birthweight and the proportion of small and large for gestational age (SGA and LGA) infants. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to show the significance of each individual factor on determining the birthweight of the babies born. Main Results and the Role of Chance: In the study group as a whole, the distribution of the SGA and LGA babies showed no deviation from the growth charts of the general population. However, when the birthweight of the children was analyzed according to the length of embryo culture from Day 2 to Days 5-6, an increase in the proportion of LGA babies was found (D2 9.4%, D3 11.5%, D5-6 18.8%; D2 n = 871, D3 n = 139, D5-6 n = 69). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that BMI (P < 0.001) and parity (P < 0.001) of the mother, as well as the embryo culture period (P = 0.007) had a significant effect on the birthweight. The value of the adjusted R2 was 0.437. Limitations, Reasons For Caution Small number of D5-6 infants and a lack of pregnancy-associated factors contributing to birthweight. Wider Implications of the Finding: This study warrants larger studies to analyze the birthweight of the IVF children, particularly after blastocyst culture. Study Funding/Competing Interes: TThe study was funded by the Family Federation of Finland, Fertility Clinic Helsinki. No competing interests. © 2013 The Author. Source

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