PITTSBURGH, PA, United States
PITTSBURGH, PA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Abbud-Antaki R.A.,Falcon Genomics, Inc. | Marhefka J.N.,Falcon Genomics, Inc. | DeLuca A.L.,Falcon Genomics, Inc. | Zuromskis M.P.,Falcon Genomics, Inc.
Hormones and Cancer | Year: 2012

Advances in genomic research have revealed that each patient has their own unique tumor profile. While silencing RNA (siRNA) screening tests can identify which genes drive tumor cell growth, results obtained from these assays have been limited in their clinical translatability because they employ cell lines growing on flat surfaces. The Cancer BioChip System (CBCS) is a functional screening assay for identification of siRNA capable of inhibiting anchorage-independent three-dimensional (3D) cancer cell growth. Anchorage-independent growth assays are important in vitro predicators of regulators of cancer cell growth. Unique features of the CBCS include a Cancer BioChip, wherein cells incorporate different siRNAs in parallel and grow in a 3D matrix to form colonies that can be quantified using real-time imaging and an image analysis software. Thus, the CBCS can be developed as a tool for personalized identification of targeted cancer therapies. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Marhefka J.N.,Falcon Genomics, Inc. | Abbud-Antaki R.A.,Falcon Genomics, Inc.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Genomic studies have revealed that breast cancer consists of a complex biological process with patient-specific genetic variations, revealing the need for individualized cancer diagnostic testing and selection of patient-specific optimal therapies. One of the bottlenecks in translation of genomic breakthroughs to the clinic is the lack of functional genomic assays that have high clinical translatability. Anchorage-independent three-dimensional (3D) growth assays are considered to be the gold-standard for chemosensitivity testing, and leads identified with these assays have high probability of clinical success. The Cancer BioChip System (CBCS) allows for the simultaneous, quantitative, and real time evaluation of multitudes of anchorage-independent breast cancer cell growth inhibitors. We employed a Test Cancer BioChip that contains silencing RNAs (siRNAs) targeting cancer-related genes to identify 3D-specific effectors of breast cancer cell growth. We compared the effect of these siRNAs on colony growth of the hormone receptor positive (MCF7) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2/c- Erythroblastic Leukemia Viral Oncogene Homolog 2 (HER2/c-erb-b2) positive (SK-BR-3) cells on the Test Cancer BioChip. Our results confirmed cell-specific inhibition of MCF7 and SK-BR-3 colony formation by estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and (ERBB2) siRNA, respectively. Both cell lines were also suppressed by Phosphoinositide-3-kinase Catalytic, alpha Polypeptide (PIK3CA) siRNA. Interestingly, we have observed responses to siRNA that are unique to this 3D setting. For example, ß-actin (ACTB) siRNA suppressed colony growth in both cell types while Cathepsin L2 (CTSL2) siRNA caused opposite effects. These results further validate the importance of the CBCS as a tool for the identification of clinically relevant breast cancer targets. © 2012 Marhefka, Abbud-Antaki.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 269.64K | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Recent genomic breakthroughs have revolutionized our understanding of cancer. It is now possible to envision treatment paradigms that would be individualized, targeted and tailored according to the tumor genetic profile. However, high-throughput functional assays capable of identifying and validating potential cancer drugs, based on abnormal tumor gene expression profiles, in a setting that would directly translate to providing recommendations for patient treatment are not readily available. The human tumor stem cell assay (HTSCA), also known as anchorage-independent growth assay, has been considered as the gold standard for chemosensitivity testing of patient tumor cells. In its current format, the HTSCA suffers from many pitfalls that make it unfit for high-throughput clinical testing. Falcon Genomics, Inc. is developing the Cancer BioChip System (CBCS), a rapid, high-throughput, automated, and quantitative anchorage-independent growth assay for the personalized identification and validation of inhibitors of cancer cell growth. We will use silencing RNA (siRNA) or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit expression of abnormally expressed tumor genes and test their impact on anchorage-independent tumor growth in a high-throughput fashion. In this Phase I application, we will develop a Test Cancer BioChip for optimizing plating, transfection, silencing, and cytostatic efficiencies. Results from these studies will validate the CBCS as a tool for cancer target identification and validation. Through future clinical trials, we anticipate development of the CBCS into a cancer diagnostic and personalized therapeutic tool. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This Phase-1 grant application is relevant to the mission of the National Institute of Health since it will provide for a Cancer BioChip System that will assist in the diagnosis and development of cancer therapies. It will initially offer a novel personalized approach to the evaluation and treatment of breast cancer patients. However, it is not limited to breast cancer since all types of cancers that are capable of growing in an anchorage-independent fashion can be tested on the Cancer BioChip System.


The present invention provides systems and methods for identification of genes related to cancer cell growth. In particular, the present invention provides functional genomic profiling of primary patient cells for identification of targeted and efficacious patient and cell-specific treatment modalities by employing a cancer biochip system (CBCS) which demonstrates improved plating efficiency, improved transfection efficiency and improved silencing efficiency. The present invention also provides a method of classifying a cancer patient based on response of cancer cells of the patient to a plurality of active agents for prediction of efficacious treatment of the cancer patient.


Patent
Falcon Genomics, Inc. | Date: 2011-11-09

A high-throughput, anchorage-independent assay is described, which screens compounds for inhibition of cancer cell growth. The assay utilizes a three-dimensional matrix or semi-solid media transfected with the subject compound, and enables live colony growth determination and imaging.


PubMed | Falcon Genomics, Inc.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2012

Genomic studies have revealed that breast cancer consists of a complex biological process with patient-specific genetic variations, revealing the need for individualized cancer diagnostic testing and selection of patient-specific optimal therapies. One of the bottlenecks in translation of genomic breakthroughs to the clinic is the lack of functional genomic assays that have high clinical translatability. Anchorage-independent three-dimensional (3D) growth assays are considered to be the gold-standard for chemosensitivity testing, and leads identified with these assays have high probability of clinical success. The Cancer BioChip System (CBCS) allows for the simultaneous, quantitative, and real time evaluation of multitudes of anchorage-independent breast cancer cell growth inhibitors. We employed a Test Cancer BioChip that contains silencing RNAs (siRNAs) targeting cancer-related genes to identify 3D-specific effectors of breast cancer cell growth. We compared the effect of these siRNAs on colony growth of the hormone receptor positive (MCF7) and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2/c- Erythroblastic Leukemia Viral Oncogene Homolog 2 (HER2/c-erb-b2) positive (SK-BR-3) cells on the Test Cancer BioChip. Our results confirmed cell-specific inhibition of MCF7 and SK-BR-3 colony formation by estrogen receptor (ESR1) and (ERBB2) siRNA, respectively. Both cell lines were also suppressed by Phosphoinositide-3-kinase Catalytic, alpha Polypeptide (PIK3CA) siRNA. Interestingly, we have observed responses to siRNA that are unique to this 3D setting. For example, -actin (ACTB) siRNA suppressed colony growth in both cell types while Cathepsin L2 (CTSL2) siRNA caused opposite effects. These results further validate the importance of the CBCS as a tool for the identification of clinically relevant breast cancer targets.


Falcon Genomics, Inc. | Entity website

OUR MISSIONFalcon Genomics strives to provide patients and providers with cutting edge technologies for accurate diagnosis of cancer and personalized formulation of therapeutic strategies. Eliminate the guesswork from your breast cancer patient management with Falcon Genomics Cancer BioChip System ...


Falcon Genomics, Inc. | Entity website

Careers Falcon Genomics, Inc. is looking to hire clinical laboratory personnel ...


Falcon Genomics, Inc. | Entity website

Falcon Genomics, Inc. 2661 Clearview Road, Suite # 1, Allison Park, PA 15101 Phone: 412-334-9240 E-mail: falcongenomics@verizon ...


PubMed | Falcon Genomics, Inc.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Hormones & cancer | Year: 2012

Advances in genomic research have revealed that each patient has their own unique tumor profile. While silencing RNA (siRNA) screening tests can identify which genes drive tumor cell growth, results obtained from these assays have been limited in their clinical translatability because they employ cell lines growing on flat surfaces. The Cancer BioChip System (CBCS) is a functional screening assay for identification of siRNA capable of inhibiting anchorage-independent three-dimensional (3D) cancer cell growth. Anchorage-independent growth assays are important in vitro predicators of regulators of cancer cell growth. Unique features of the CBCS include a Cancer BioChip, wherein cells incorporate different siRNAs in parallel and grow in a 3D matrix to form colonies that can be quantified using real-time imaging and an image analysis software. Thus, the CBCS can be developed as a tool for personalized identification of targeted cancer therapies.

Loading Falcon Genomics, Inc. collaborators
Loading Falcon Genomics, Inc. collaborators