Fairfield, CT, United States
Fairfield, CT, United States

Fairfield University is a private, co-educational undergraduate and master's level teaching-oriented university located in Fairfield, Connecticut, in the New England region of the United States. It was founded by the Society of Jesus in 1942, and today is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. The primary objectives of a Fairfield University education are to develop the creative intellectual potential of its students and to foster in them ethical and religious values and a sense of social responsibility. All schools of the university are committed to a liberal humanistic approach to education, which encourages interdisciplinary learning.About 3,500 undergraduate and 1,200 graduate students study in Fairfield's five schools and colleges: The Fairfield University College of Arts and science, The Charles F. Dolan School of Business, The School of Engineering, The School of Nursing, and The Graduate School of Education and Allied Professions. The university is notable academically for its nationally recognized accounting and nursing programs along with its liberal arts and science programs which have produced a MacArthur Fellow, a Guggenheim Fellow and sixty-two Fulbright Scholars since 1993. In addition, two Fairfield faculty members were named consecutive Connecticut Professors of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2009 and 2010 in recognition of their extraordinary dedication to undergraduate teaching. Wikipedia.


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Ozcelik Y.,Fairfield University
International Journal of Project Management | Year: 2010

This paper examines whether implementation of business process reengineering (BPR) projects improve firm performance by analyzing a comprehensive data set on large firms in the United States. The performance measures utilized in the paper are labor productivity, return on assets, and return on equity. We show that firm performance increases after the BPR projects are finalized, while it remains unaffected during execution. We also find that functionally focused BPR projects on average contribute more to performance than those with a broader cross-functional scope. This may be an indication that potential failure risk of BPR projects may increase beyond a certain level of scope. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd and IPMA.


Xu M.,Fairfield University
Optics Express | Year: 2011

The scattering-phase theorem states that the values of scattering and reduced scattering coefficients of the bulk random media are proportional to the variance of the phase and the variance of the phase gradient, respectively, of the phase map of light passing through one thin slice of the medium. We report a new derivation of the scattering phase theorem and provide the correct form of the relation between the variance of phase gradient and the reduced scattering coefficient. We show the scattering-phase theorem is the consequence of anomalous diffraction by a thin slice of forward-peaked scattering media. A new set of scattering-phase relations with relaxed requirement on the thickness of the slice are provided. The condition for the scattering-phase theorem to be valid is discussed and illustrated with simulated data. The scattering-phase theorem is then applied to determine the scattering coefficient μs, the reduced scattering coefficient μs', and the anisotropy factor g for polystyrene sphere and Intralipid-20% suspensions with excellent accuracy from quantitative phase imaging of respective thin slices. The spatially-resolved μs, μs' and g maps obtained via such a scattering-phase relationship may find general applications in the characterization of the optical property of homogeneous and heterogeneous random media. © 2011 Optical Society of America.


Henkel L.A.,Fairfield University
Psychological Science | Year: 2014

Two studies examined whether photographing objects impacts what is remembered about them. Participants were led on a guided tour of an art museum and were directed to observe some objects and to photograph others. Results showed a photo-taking-impairment effect: If participants took a photo of each object as a whole, they remembered fewer objects and remembered fewer details about the objects and the objects' locations in the museum than if they instead only observed the objects and did not photograph them. However, when participants zoomed in to photograph a specific part of the object, their subsequent recognition and detail memory was not impaired, and, in fact, memory for features that were not zoomed in on was just as strong as memory for features that were zoomed in on. This finding highlights key differences between people's memory and the camera's "memory" and suggests that the additional attentional and cognitive processes engaged by this focused activity can eliminate the photo-taking-impairment effect. © The Author(s) 2013.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: WORKFORCE IN THE MATHEMAT SCI | Award Amount: 260.00K | Year: 2014

The Fairfield University Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program in Mathematics and Computational Science is an eight-week summer program designed to engage talented undergraduates in original mathematics and computing research, beyond the college curriculum. The program hosts nine students per summer, providing on-campus housing and student stipends. The participants spend their time working and learning in small groups, with each group in close consultation with an individual Fairfield University faculty mentor on research topics drawn from the mentors field of expertise.

The principal goal of the program is to prepare the participants for research-based scientific careers, and to engender in each student a deep understanding not only of the importance of individual scientific research, but also of the broader context of collaboration into which that research fits. This is achieved by providing the students with the experience of a research cohort. This collaborative research environment - students working with faculty and with each other - also allows for the general advancement of the mathematics and computing disciplines, and fosters the continuing scholarly and pedagogical development of all the academic professionals involved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 130.00K | Year: 2011

The author will undertake several projects in the area of dynamical systems and ergodic theory. The first project concerns open systems, which are inspired by physical models in which mass or energy is allowed to escape. The project will study various mechanisms that facilitate or hinder escape in nonuniformly hyperbolic systems and use the relation between entropy and positive Lyapunov exponents to quantify the escape rate. The second project develops a powerful approach, the spectral decomposition of the transfer operator, to study the statistical properties of particle systems, which are an important class of models from mathematical physics. The third project investigates the behavior of dynamical systems which are comprised of (possibly infinitely many) smaller components linked together, with orbits or energy allowed to pass between components. When focused on one component at a time, such systems generalize the discussion of open systems in a natural way by allowing both entry and escape. All three projects involve a detailed analysis of the spectral properties of the transfer operator associated with the corresponding closed system without relying on restrictive Markovian assumptions on the dynamics.

Much research in dynamical systems has focused on closed systems in which the dynamics are self-contained. In many modeling situations, however, it is not possible to obtain such a global view so that it becomes necessary to study local systems that are influenced by other unknown systems, possibly on different scales. Such considerations motivate the study of the types of systems considered in this project: systems in which mass or energy may enter or exit through deterministic or random mechanisms. Many of these problems are motivated by models from mathematical physics. For example, open particle systems are used to model atom traps; extended and linked particle systems are used to create mechanical models of heat conduction in solids and to investigate metastability in molecular processes. The research will provide analytical tools to solve problems posed and approached formally in the physics literature. The project will both promote and be informed by this interdisciplinary dialogue. In addition, the project will support undergraduate research in mathematics. Using the highly visual nature and physical motivation of the problems described, the PI will recruit undergraduate students to work on projects related to these topics during the summers. Students will disseminate the results of their research at poster sessions and through publication in undergraduate or research journals, as appropriate. By stimulating interest in research careers in mathematics and creating a peer community supportive of that interest, the project will contribute to the important goal of integrating research and education.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 168.50K | Year: 2014

The research funded by this grant will focus in large part on the study of mathematical models of particle systems with collision interactions that are central to the field of statistical mechanics, and in particular to our understanding of chaotic dynamical systems. Such systems play an important role in the study of non-equilibrium dynamics, which model, for example, the motion of particles subjected to external forces or nonelastic collisions. Other examples of non-equilbrium dynamics include systems in which mass or energy is allowed to escape, and large-scale systems of smaller interacting components which exchange mass or energy. Such systems have been used in theoretical physics and chemical engineering to model atom traps, explore mechanisms for heat conduction in solids and investigate metastability in molecular processes. Rigorous mathematical results obtained during the course of this grant will aid in the interpretation of these studies as well as suggest new directions of inquiry. This grant also supports the involvement of undergraduates in mathematics research. Using the highly visual nature and physical motivation of the problems outlined above, the author will recruit undergraduate students to work on these topics during each summer funded by the grant. Special emphasis will be given to recruiting students from underrepresented groups in research mathematics. Students will disseminate results of their research at poster sessions and through publication in undergraduate or research journals, as appropriate. By stimulating interest in research careers in mathematics and creating a peer community supportive of that interest, the grant will contribute to the important goal of integrating research and education.

Much research in dynamical systems focuses on closed systems in which the dynamics are self-contained. In many modeling situations, however, such a global view is not possible and it becomes necessary to study local systems that are influenced by other unknown systems, possibly on different scales. Such considerations motivate many of the systems to be studied during the course of this grant: systems in which mass or energy may enter or exit through deterministic or random mechanisms. The grant is organized around three specific projects: The first project investigates the statistical properties of both classical and non-equilibrium particle systems, which constitute an important class of models from statistical mechanics as described above; the second concerns open systems, which are inspired by physical models in which mass or energy is allowed to escape; the third project investigates the behavior of dynamical systems which are comprised of (possibly infinitely many) smaller components linked together, with orbits or energy allowed to pass between them. When focused on one component at a time, such systems generalize the discussion of open systems in a natural way by allowing both entry and escape. The intellectual merit of the research activity funded by the grant stems from the depth of the analytical tools to be developed as well as the complexity and variety of the systems under consideration. Using his recent work concerning the spectral decomposition of the transfer operator for dispersing particle systems, the author will investigate both equilibrium and non-equilibrium models from statistical mechanics. This approach is expected to resolve a longstanding conjecture by Bowen and Ruelle regarding the continuous time flow and to provide rigorous analysis of physically important quantities such as entropy production. A second tool the author will use is the construction of Markov extensions (a generalization of finite and countable Markov partitions), which make no Markovian assumptions on the dynamics and are widely applicable to nonuniformly hyperbolic systems, including Hénon maps and a wide variety of particle systems. The application of such tools to systems out of equilibrium, open coupled map lattices and extended systems will represent significant advances in the study of such systems. Efforts to understand these tools in one context strengthens them and aids in their application to other areas of mathematics. Their intellectual interest is enhanced by the application of these ideas to resolve problems posed and approached formally in the physics literature.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 271.41K | Year: 2016

With this award from the Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI) and support from the Chemistry Research Instrumentation Program (CRIF), Professor Jillian Smith-Carpenter from Fairfield University and colleagues Matthew Kubasik, John Miecznikowski, Aaron Van Dyke and Catherine Andersen have acquired a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer). In general, mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the key analytical methods used to identify and characterize small quantities of chemical species embedded in complex matrices. A laser impinging on the inert matrix embedded with the sample, vaporizes and ionizes the sample. The ions pass into the mass spectrometer where the masses of the parent ion and its fragment ions are measured. In a time-of-flight instrument the ions are accelerated by an electric field to allow further characterization. MALDI TOF combines gentle ionization (ideal for producing intact ions of peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, synthetic polymers, and other similarly sized species) with a detection mode that offers an excellent balance between sensitivity and accuracy across a wide mass range. The collision-induced dissociation facilitates fragmentation of molecular ions in the gas phase. This highly sensitive technique allows identification and determination of the structure of molecules in a complex mixture. The acquisition strengthens the research infrastructure at the University and regional area. The instrument broadens participation by involving diverse students in research and research training with this modern analytical technique and is shared with students at the University of Bridgeport and numerous laboratories in Southwestern Connecticut.

The award is aimed at enhancing research and education at all levels, especially in areas such as (a) obtaining the polymeric distribution of disulfide cross-linked peptide oligomers and aggregates; (b) exploring small molecule strategies for protein labeling; (c) understanding the role of high-density lipoproteins in the regulation of immune activity; (d) developing solid-phase peptide synthesis of alpha,alpha-dialkylated amino acids and (e) developing aqueous transition metal catalysts.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Physiolg Mechansms&Biomechancs | Award Amount: 404.31K | Year: 2014

Locomotion and feeding are essential behaviors for the survival and reproductive fitness of most animals. However, little is understood about why some individuals within a population outperform others and are better suited to their habitat. Populations of bluegill sunfish often diverge into two different body forms based on their habitat: a deeper-bodied shallow water form or a streamlined deep water form. This variation creates an ideal system for investigating the relationships between form, function and adaptation to habitat.

This project will integrate studies of behavior in the field, external and internal morphology and muscle physiology, energy metabolism, swimming performance, feeding mechanics and fitness measurements in order to quantify variation in swimming and feeding performance within a single population of bluegill from pelagic and littoral habitats. Results from this research will provide unprecedented insight into the complex interrelationships of body form, swimming and feeding performance and fitness in fish. Moreover, this research will provide an experimental and analytical framework that could be applied to any animal system. This proposal is a collaborative effort among three liberal arts institutions, therefore an important component of the project will be the mentoring of a postdoctoral researcher and the training of undergraduates, a high proportion of whom will continue their education in graduate or professional schools, increasing the participation of underrepresented groups in the sciences. The research will be implemented in an outreach program aimed to introduce basic concepts of biomechanics and physiology to underrepresented K-12 students at neighboring schools.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 296.57K | Year: 2010

The Fairfield University Research Experience for Undergraduates Program in Mathematics and Computational Science is an eight-week summer program designed to engage talented undergraduates in original mathematics and computing research beyond the standard college curriculum. The program hosts between nine and twelve students per summer, providing on-campus housing and student stipends. The students will typically come from institutions with limited access to faculty-sponsored summer scholarly activity for undergraduates, and students from groups that are underrepresented in mathematics and computing are especially encouraged to apply. Throughout the program, the participants work and learn in small groups, each group in close consultation with an individual Fairfield University faculty mentor on research topics drawn from the mentors field of expertise.

The principal goal of the program is to prepare the participants for research-based scientific careers, and to engender in each student a deep understanding not only of the importance of individual scientific research, but also of the broader context of collaboration into which that research fits. This is achieved by providing the students with the experience of a research cohort, which is the motivation for the design of the program. By creating an environment of collaboration for the students and their faculty mentors, the program enables the means to achieve its goal, allows for the general advancement of the mathematics and computing disciplines, and fosters the continuing scholarly and pedagogical development of all the academic professionals involved in the program.

This site is supported by the Department of Defense in partnership with the NSF REU program.


The present invention provides a new and unique technique for providing simulation-based education tools and strategies, including for building a simulation program, such as a simulation program for educating and training nurses and other health care professionals. The simulation technique features a simulation module having one or more database and simulation scenario building modules. The database module is configured to receive inputs or instructions containing information about a selection of one or more simulation parameters stored therein, chosen by a simulation builder, including faculty, instructors or clinical educators, and based on some combination of personal preferences and specific teaching or learning objectives for building a customized simulation for educating and training nurses and other health care professionals. The database module is also configured to provide information about the selection of one or more simulation parameters. The simulation scenario building module is configured to receive the information about the selection of one or more simulation parameters, and to provide simulation scenario building signaling containing information about one or more customized simulation scenarios built for the customized simulation for educating and training nurses and other health care professionals based at least partly on the selection of the one or more simulation parameters contained in the signaling.

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