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Espinel-Ingroff A.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Chakrabarti A.,Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research | Chowdhary A.,University of Delhi | Cordoba S.,Instituto Nacional Of Enfermedades Infecciosas Dr C G Malbran | And 12 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2015

Clinical breakpoints (CBPs) have not been established for the Mucorales and any antifungal agent. In lieu of CBPs, epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) are proposed for amphotericin B, posaconazole, and itraconazole and four Mucorales species. Wildtype (WT) MIC distributions (organisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable acquired resistance mechanisms) were defined with available pooled CLSI MICs from 14 laboratories (Argentina, Australia, Canada, Europe, India, Mexico, and the United States) as follows: 10 Apophysomyces variabilis, 32 Cunninghamella bertholletiae, 136 Lichtheimia corymbifera, 10 Mucor indicus, 123 M. circinelloides, 19 M. ramosissimus, 349 Rhizopus arrhizus, 146 R. microsporus, 33 Rhizomucor pusillus, and 36 Syncephalastrum racemosum isolates. CLSI broth microdilution MICs were aggregated for the analyses. ECVs comprising ≥95% and ≥97.5% of the modeled populations were as follows: amphotericin B ECVs for L. corymbifera were 1 and 2 μg/ml, those for M. circinelloides were 1 and 2 μg/ml, those for R. arrhizus were 2 and 4 μg/ml, and those for R. microsporus were 2 and 2 μg/ml, respectively; posaconazole ECVs for L. corymbifera were 1 and 2, those for M. circinelloides were 4 and 4, those for R. arrhizus were 1 and 2, and those for R. microsporus were 1 and 2, respectively; both itraconazole ECVs for R. arrhizus were 2 μg/ ml. ECVs may aid in detecting emerging resistance or isolates with reduced susceptibility (non-WT MICs) to the agents evaluated. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Espinel-Ingroff A.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Arendrup M.C.,Statens Serum Institute | Pfaller M.A.,University of Iowa | Bonfietti L.X.,Adolfo Lutz Institute | And 20 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2013

Although Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) clinical breakpoints (CBPs) are available for interpreting echinocandin MICs for Candida spp., epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) based on collective MIC data from multiple laboratories have not been defined. While collating CLSI caspofungin MICs for 145 to 11,550 Candida isolates from 17 laboratories (Brazil, Canada, Europe, Mexico, Peru, and the United States), we observed an extraordinary amount of modal variability (wide ranges) among laboratories as well as truncated and bimodal MIC distributions. The species-specific modes across different laboratories ranged from 0.016 to 0.5 μg/ml for C. albicans and C. tropicalis, 0.031 to 0.5 =g/ml for C. glabrata, and 0.063 to 1 =g/ml for C. krusei. Variability was also similar among MIC distributions for C. dubliniensis and C. lusitaniae. The exceptions were C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii MIC distributions, where most modes were within one 2-fold dilution of each other. These findings were consistent with available data from the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) (403 to 2,556 MICs) for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis. Although many factors (caspofungin powder source, stock solution solvent, powder storage time length and temperature, and MIC determination testing parameters) were examined as a potential cause of such unprecedented variability, a single specific cause was not identified. Therefore, it seems highly likely that the use of the CLSI species-specific caspofungin CBPs could lead to reporting an excessive number of wild-type (WT) isolates (e.g., C. glabrata and C. krusei) as either non-WT or resistant isolates. Until this problem is resolved, routine testing or reporting of CLSI caspofungin MICs for Candida is not recommended; micafungin or anidulafungin data could be used instead. Copyright © 2013 White.


Espinel-Ingroff A.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Colombo A.L.,University of Sao Paulo | Cordoba S.,Instituto Nacional Of Enfermedades Infecciosas Dr C G Malbran | Dufresne P.J.,Institute National Of Sante Publique Du Quebec | And 14 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2016

The CLSI epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) of antifungal agents are available for various Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., and the Mucorales. However, those categorical endpoints have not been established for Fusarium spp., mostly due to the difficulties associated with collecting sufficient CLSI MICs for clinical isolates identified according to the currently recommended molecular DNA-PCR-based identification methodologies. CLSI MIC distributions were established for 53 Fusarium dimerum species complex (SC), 10 F. fujikuroi, 82 F. proliferatum, 20 F. incarnatum-F. equiseti SC, 226 F. oxysporum SC, 608 F. solani SC, and 151 F. verticillioides isolates originating in 17 laboratories (in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Europe, Mexico, and the United States). According to the CLSI guidelines for ECV setting, ECVs encompassing ≥97.5% of pooled statistically modeled MIC distributions were as follows: for amphotericin B, 4 μg/ml (F. verticillioides) and 8 μg/ml (F. oxysporum SC and F. solani SC); for posaconazole, 2 μg/ml (F. verticillioides), 8 μg/ml (F. oxysporum SC), and 32 μg/ml (F. solani SC); for voriconazole, 4 μg/ml (F. verticillioides), 16 μg/ml (F. oxysporum SC), and 32 μg/ml (F. solani SC); and for itraconazole, 32 μg/ml (F. oxysporum SC and F. solani SC). Insufficient data precluded ECV definition for the other species. Although these ECVs could aid in detecting non-wild-type isolates with reduced susceptibility to the agents evaluated, the relationship between molecular mechanisms of resistance (gene mutations) and MICs still needs to be investigated for Fusarium spp. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Espinel-Ingroff A.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Chowdhary A.,University of Delhi | Cuenca-Estrella M.,Institute Salud Carlos III | Fothergill A.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | And 19 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2012

Clinical breakpoints (CBPs) are not available for the Cryptococcus neoformans-Cryptococcus gattii species complex. MIC distributions were constructed for the wild type (WT) to establish epidemiologic cutoff values (ECVs) for C. neoformans and C. gattii versus amphotericin B and flucytosine. A total of 3,590 amphotericin B and 3,045 flucytosine CLSI MICs for C. neoformans (including 1,002 VNI isolates and 8 to 39 VNII, VNIII, and VNIV isolates) and 985 and 853 MICs for C. gattii, respectively (including 42 to 259 VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV isolates), were gathered in 9 to 16 (amphotericin B) and 8 to 13 (flucytosine) laboratories (Europe, United States, Australia, Brazil, Canada, India, and South Africa) and aggregated for the analyses. Additionally, 442 amphotericin B and 313 flucytosine MICs measured by using CLSI-YNB medium instead of CLSI-RPMI medium and 237 Etest amphotericin B MICs for C. neoformans were evaluated. CLSI-RPMI ECVs for distributions originating in ≥3 laboratories (with the percentages of isolates for which MICs were less than or equal to ECVs given in parentheses) were as follows: for amphotericin B, 0.5 μg/ml for C. neoformans VNI (97.2%) and C. gattii VGI and VGIIa (99.2 and 97.5%, respectively) and 1 μg/ml for C. neoformans (98.5%) and C. gattii nontyped (100%) and VGII (99.2%) isolates; for flucytosine, 4 μg/ml for C. gattii nontyped (96.4%) and VGI (95.7%) isolates, 8 μg/ml for VNI (96.6%) isolates, and 16 μg/ml for C. neoformans nontyped (98.6%) and C. gattii VGII (97.1%) isolates. Other molecular types had apparent variations in MIC distributions, but the number of laboratories contributing data was too low to allow us to ascertain that the differences were due to factors other than assay variation. ECVs may aid in the detection of isolates with acquired resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Pfaller M.A.,JMI Laboratories | Pfaller M.A.,University of Iowa | Espinel-Ingroff A.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Bustamante B.,Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University | And 15 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2014

Since epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) using CLSI MICs from multiple laboratories are not available for Candida spp. and the echinocandins, we established ECVs for anidulafungin and micafungin on the basis of wild-type (WT) MIC distributions (for organisms in a species-drug combination with no detectable acquired resistance mechanisms) for 8,210 Candida albicans, 3,102 C. glabrata, 3,976 C. parapsilosis, 2,042 C. tropicalis, 617 C. krusei, 258 C. lusitaniae, 234 C. guilliermondii, and 131 C. dubliniensis isolates. CLSI broth microdilution MIC data gathered from 15 different laboratories in Canada, Europe, Mexico, Peru, and the United States were aggregated to statistically define ECVs. ECVs encompassing 97.5% of the statistically modeled population for anidulafungin and micafungin were, respectively, 0.12 and 0.03 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.12 and 0.03 μg/ml for C. glabrata, 8 and 4 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis, 0.12 and 0.06 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.25 and 0.25 g/ml for C. krusei, 1 and 0.5 μg/ml for C. lusitaniae, 8 and 2 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, and 0.12 and 0.12 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis. Previously reported single and multicenter ECVs defined in the present study were quite similar or within 1 2-fold dilution of each other. For a collection of 230 WT isolates (no fks mutations) and 51 isolates with fks mutations, the species-specific ECVs for anidulafungin and micafungin correctly classified 47 (92.2%) and 51 (100%) of the fks mutants, respectively, as non-WT strains. These ECVs may aid in detecting non-WT isolates with reduced susceptibility to anidulafungin and micafungin due to fks mutations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Espinel-Ingroff A.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Pfaller M.A.,JMI Laboratories | Pfaller M.A.,University of Iowa | Bustamante B.,Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University | And 17 more authors.
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy | Year: 2014

Although epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) have been established for Candida spp. and the triazoles, they are based on MIC data from a single laboratory. We have established ECVs for eight Candida species and fluconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole based on wild-type (WT) MIC distributions for isolates of C. albicans (n = 11,241 isolates), C. glabrata (7,538), C. parapsilosis (6,023), C. tropicalis (3,748), C. krusei (1,073), C. lusitaniae (574), C. guilliermondii (373), and C. dubliniensis (162). The 24-h CLSI broth microdilution MICs were collated from multiple laboratories (in Canada, Brazil, Europe, Mexico, Peru, and the United States). The ECVs for distributions originating from ≥6 laboratories, which included ≥95% of the modeled WT population, for fluconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole were, respectively, 0.5, 0.06 and 0.03 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. dubliniensis, 8, 1, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. glabrata, 8, 0.5, and 0.12 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, 32, 0.5, and 0.25 μg/ml for C. krusei, 1, 0.06, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. lusitaniae, 1, 0.25, and 0.03 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis, and 1, 0.12, and 0.06 μg/ml for C. tropicalis. The low number of MICs (<100) for other less prevalent species (C. famata, C. kefyr, C. orthopsilosis, C. rugosa) precluded ECV definition, but their MIC distributions are documented. Evaluation of our ECVs for some species/agent combinations using published individual MICs for 136 isolates (harboring mutations in or upregulation of ERG11, MDR1, CDR1, or CDR2) and 64 WT isolates indicated that our ECVs may be useful in distinguishing WT from non-WT isolates. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


PubMed | Virginia Commonwealth University, National Mycology Reference Center, Institute National Of Sante Publique Du Quebec, University of Milan and 13 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy | Year: 2016

The CLSI epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) of antifungal agents are available for various Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., and the Mucorales. However, those categorical endpoints have not been established for Fusarium spp., mostly due to the difficulties associated with collecting sufficient CLSI MICs for clinical isolates identified according to the currently recommended molecular DNA-PCR-based identification methodologies. CLSI MIC distributions were established for 53 Fusarium dimerum species complex (SC), 10 F. fujikuroi, 82 F. proliferatum, 20 F. incarnatum-F. equiseti SC, 226 F. oxysporum SC, 608 F. solani SC, and 151 F. verticillioides isolates originating in 17 laboratories (in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Europe, Mexico, and the United States). According to the CLSI guidelines for ECV setting, ECVs encompassing 97.5% of pooled statistically modeled MIC distributions were as follows: for amphotericin B, 4 g/ml (F. verticillioides) and 8 g/ml (F. oxysporum SC and F. solani SC); for posaconazole, 2 g/ml (F. verticillioides), 8 g/ml (F. oxysporum SC), and 32 g/ml (F. solani SC); for voriconazole, 4 g/ml (F. verticillioides), 16 g/ml (F. oxysporum SC), and 32 g/ml (F. solani SC); and for itraconazole, 32 g/ml (F. oxysporum SC and F. solani SC). Insufficient data precluded ECV definition for the other species. Although these ECVs could aid in detecting non-wild-type isolates with reduced susceptibility to the agents evaluated, the relationship between molecular mechanisms of resistance (gene mutations) and MICs still needs to be investigated for Fusarium spp.


Ferrero J.J.,Complutense University of Madrid | Alvarez A.M.,Complutense University of Madrid | Ramirez-Franco J.,Complutense University of Madrid | Godino M.C.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Biological Chemistry | Year: 2013

The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin facilitates synaptic transmission presynaptically via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). In addition, cAMP also increases glutamate release via PKA-independent mechanisms, although the downstream presynaptic targets remain largely unknown. Here, we describe the isolation of a PKA-independent component of glutamate release in cerebrocortical nerve terminals after blocking Na+ channels with tetrodotoxin. We found that 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, a specific activator of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), mimicked and occluded forskolininduced potentiation of glutamate release. This Epac-mediated increase in glutamate release was dependent on phospholipase C, and it increased the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Moreover, the potentiation of glutamate release by Epac was independent of protein kinase C, although it was attenuated by the diacylglycerol-binding site antagonist calphostin C. Epac activation translocated the active zone protein Munc13-1 from soluble to particulate fractions; it increased the association between Rab3A and RIM1α and redistributed synaptic vesicles closer to the presynaptic membrane. Furthermore, these responses were mimicked by the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonist isoproterenol, consistent with the immunoelectron microscopy and immunocytochemical data demonstrating presynaptic expression of βARs in a subset of glutamatergic synapses in the cerebral cortex. Based on these findings, we conclude that βARs couple to a cAMP/Epac/PLC/Munc13/Rab3/RIM- dependent pathway to enhance glutamate release at cerebrocortical nerve terminals. © 2013 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc. Published in the U.S.A.


Moya-Alvarez V.,University of Paris Descartes | Moya-Alvarez V.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Abellana R.,Facultat de Medicina | Cot M.,University of Paris Descartes | Cot M.,University Pierre and Marie Curie
Malaria Journal | Year: 2014

Albeit pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) poses a potential risk for over 125 million women each year, an accurate review assessing the impact on malaria in infants has yet to be conducted. In addition to an effect on low birth weight (LBW) and prematurity, PAM determines foetal exposure to Plasmodium falciparum in utero and is correlated to congenital malaria and early development of clinical episodes during infancy. This interaction plausibly results from an ongoing immune tolerance process to antigens in utero, however, a complete explanation of this immune process remains a question for further research, as does the precise role of protective maternal antibodies. Preventive interventions against PAM modify foetal exposure to P. falciparum in utero, and have thus an effect on perinatal malaria outcomes. Effective intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) diminishes placental malaria (PM) and its subsequent malaria-associated morbidity. However, emerging resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is currently hindering the efficacy of IPTp regimes and the efficacy of alternative strategies, such as intermittent screening and treatment (IST), has not been accurately evaluated in different transmission settings. Due to the increased risk of clinical malaria for offspring of malaria infected mothers, PAM preventive interventions should ideally start during the preconceptual period. Innovative research examining the effect of PAM on the neurocognitive development of the infant, as well as examining the potential influence of HLA-G polymorphisms on malaria symptoms, is urged to contribute to a better understanding of PAM and infant health. © 2014 Moya-Alvarez et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | University of Barcelona, XaRTA TPV, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science and Facultat de Medicina
Type: | Journal: Neurobiology of disease | Year: 2016

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a key lipid in nervous system homeostasis, is depleted in the spinal cord of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) patients. However, the basis for such loss was unknown.DHA synthetic machinery was evaluated in spinal cord samples from ALS patients and controls by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Further, lipid composition was measured in organotypic spinal cord cultures by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. In these samples, mitochondrial respiratory functions were measured by high resolution respirometry. Finally, Neuro2-A and stem cell-derived human neurons were used for evaluating mechanistic relationships between TDP-43 aggregation, oxidative stress and cellular changes in DHA-related proteins.ALS is associated to changes in the spinal cord distribution of DHA synthesis enzymatic machinery comparing ten ALS cases and eight controls. We found increased levels of desaturases (ca 95% increase, p<0.001), but decreased amounts of DHA-related -oxidation enzymes in ALS samples (40% decrease, p<0.05). Further, drebrin, a DHA-dependent synaptic protein, is depleted in spinal cord samples from ALS patients (around 40% loss, p<0.05). In contrast, chronic excitotoxicity in spinal cord increases DHA acid amount, with both enhanced concentrations of neuroprotective docosahexaenoic acid-derived resolvin D, and higher lipid peroxidation-derived molecules such as 8-iso-prostaglandin-F2- (8-iso-PGF2) levels. Since -tocopherol improved mitochondrial respiratory function and motor neuron survival in these conditions, it is suggested that oxidative stress could boost motor neuron loss. Cell culture and metabolic flux experiments, showing enhanced expression of desaturases (FADS2) and -oxidation enzymes after H2O2 challenge suggest that DHA production can be an initial response to oxidative stress, driven by TDP-43 aggregation and drebrin loss. Interestingly, these changes were dependent on cell type used, since human neurons exhibited losses of FADS2 and drebrin after oxidative stress. These features (drebrin loss and FADS2 alterations) were also produced by transfection by aggregation prone C-terminal fragments of TDP-43.sALS is associated with tissue-specific DHA-dependent synthetic machinery alteration. Furthermore, excitotoxicity sinergizes with oxidative stress to increase DHA levels, which could act as a response over stress, involving the expression of DHA synthetic enzymes. Later on, this allostatic overload could exacerbate cell stress by contributing to TDP-43 aggregation. This, at its turn, could blunt this protective response, overall leading to DHA depletion and neuronal dysfunction.

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