Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica

Porto Alegre, Brazil

Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica

Porto Alegre, Brazil
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Lehnen T.E.,Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica | Lehnen T.E.,Institute Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul | da Silva M.R.,Institute Cardiologia Fundacao Of Cardiologia Ic Fuc | Camacho A.,Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica | And 5 more authors.
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition | Year: 2015

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is highly found in fats from ruminants and it appears to favorably modify the body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors. The capacity of CLA to reduce the body fat levels as well as its benefic actions on glycemic profile, atherosclerosis and cancer has already been proved in experimental models. Furthermore, CLA supplementation may modulate the immune function, help re-synthetize of glycogen and potentiate the bone mineralization. CLA supplementation also could increase the lipolysis and reduce the accumulation of fatty acids on the adipose tissue; the putative mechanisms involved may be its action in reducing the lipase lipoprotein activity and to increase the carnitine-palmitoil-transferase-1 (CAT-1) activity, its interaction with PPARγ, and to raise the expression of UCP-1. Although studies made in human have shown some benefits of CLA supplementation as the weight loss, the results are still discordant. Moreover, some have shown adverse effects, such as negative effects on glucose metabolism and lipid profile. The purpose of this article is to review the available data regarding the benefits of CLA on the energetic metabolism and body composition, emphasizing action mechanisms. © 2015 Lehnen et al.


Geremia J.M.,Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica | Iskiewicz M.M.,Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica | Marschner R.A.,Institute Cardiologia | Lehnen T.E.,Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica | Lehnen A.M.,Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands) | Year: 2015

The adaptations of the human body resulting from the aging process especially loss of flexibility can increase the risk of falls and the risk of developing other health conditions. Exercise training, in particular the Pilates exercise method, has become an important form of physical activity that minimizes the deleterious effects of aging on flexibility. Few studies have evaluated the effect of this training method on body flexibility among elderly. We aimed to evaluate the effects of physical training using the Pilates method on body flexibility of elderly individuals. Eighteen elderly women and two elderly men (aged 70 ± 4 years) followed a 10-week Pilates training program. Individuals were recruited from the local community via open invitations. At study entry, none of them had limited mobility (walking requiring the use of walkers or canes). Furthermore, those with neurologic, muscular, or psychiatric disorders as well as those using an assistive device for ambulation were excluded secondary to limited participation. Flexibility assessment tests (flexion, extension, right and left tilt, and right and left rotation of the cervical and thoracolumbar spine; flexion, extension, abduction, and lateral and medial right and left rotation of the glenohumeral joint; flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and lateral and medial rotation of the right and left hip; and flexion of the right and left knee) were performed by a blinded evaluator using a flexometer before and after the training period. All assessments were carried out at the same time of day. There was an observed increase in flexion (22.86%; p < 0.001), extension (10.49%; p < 0.036), and rotation to the left side (20.45%; p < 0.019) of the cervical spine; flexion (16.45%; p < 0.001), extension (23.74%; p = 0.006), lateral bending right (39.52%; p < 0.001) and left (38.02%; p < 0.001), and right rotation (24.85%; p < 0.001) and left (24.24%; p < 0.001) of the thoracolumbar spine; flexion (right--8.80%, p = 0.034; left--7.03%, p = 0.050), abduction (right--20.69%, p < 0.001; left--16.26%, p = 0.005), and external rotation (right--116.07% and left--143%; p < 0.001 for both directions) of the glenohumeral joint; flexion (right--15.83%, p = 0.050; left--9.55%, p = 0.047) of the hips; and bending (right--14.20%, p = 0.006; left--15.20%, p = 0.017) the knees. The joint with the greatest magnitude of improvement was the thoracolumbar spine. Thus, this type of training may minimize the deleterious effects of aging and may improve the functionality of elderly individuals, which would reduce the likelihood of accidents (especially falls).


PubMed | Institute Cardiologia and Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands) | Year: 2015

The adaptations of the human body resulting from the aging process especially loss of flexibility can increase the risk of falls and the risk of developing other health conditions. Exercise training, in particular the Pilates exercise method, has become an important form of physical activity that minimizes the deleterious effects of aging on flexibility. Few studies have evaluated the effect of this training method on body flexibility among elderly. We aimed to evaluate the effects of physical training using the Pilates method on body flexibility of elderly individuals. Eighteen elderly women and two elderly men (aged 70 4 years) followed a 10-week Pilates training program. Individuals were recruited from the local community via open invitations. At study entry, none of them had limited mobility (walking requiring the use of walkers or canes). Furthermore, those with neurologic, muscular, or psychiatric disorders as well as those using an assistive device for ambulation were excluded secondary to limited participation. Flexibility assessment tests (flexion, extension, right and left tilt, and right and left rotation of the cervical and thoracolumbar spine; flexion, extension, abduction, and lateral and medial right and left rotation of the glenohumeral joint; flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and lateral and medial rotation of the right and left hip; and flexion of the right and left knee) were performed by a blinded evaluator using a flexometer before and after the training period. All assessments were carried out at the same time of day. There was an observed increase in flexion (22.86%; p < 0.001), extension (10.49%; p < 0.036), and rotation to the left side (20.45%; p < 0.019) of the cervical spine; flexion (16.45%; p < 0.001), extension (23.74%; p = 0.006), lateral bending right (39.52%; p < 0.001) and left (38.02%; p < 0.001), and right rotation (24.85%; p < 0.001) and left (24.24%; p < 0.001) of the thoracolumbar spine; flexion (right--8.80%, p = 0.034; left--7.03%, p = 0.050), abduction (right--20.69%, p < 0.001; left--16.26%, p = 0.005), and external rotation (right--116.07% and left--143%; p < 0.001 for both directions) of the glenohumeral joint; flexion (right--15.83%, p = 0.050; left--9.55%, p = 0.047) of the hips; and bending (right--14.20%, p = 0.006; left--15.20%, p = 0.017) the knees. The joint with the greatest magnitude of improvement was the thoracolumbar spine. Thus, this type of training may minimize the deleterious effects of aging and may improve the functionality of elderly individuals, which would reduce the likelihood of accidents (especially falls).

Loading Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica collaborators
Loading Faculdade Sogipa de Educacao Fisica collaborators