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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

North Star Mutual Insurance Company, a regional insurance company writing over $390 million in seven Midwestern states, has selected OnBase by Hyland, a single enterprise information platform, to support its digital enterprise strategy. The mutual insurer, which partners with nearly 1,300 independent agencies, will convert from its current document management system due to the rich features and impressive potential of OnBase. Phase one of North Star Mutual’s OnBase implementation will commence with the conversion of existing underwriting and claims image data structures and workflow processes. Already a paperless organization, North Star will enhance data collection from documents using OnBase Advanced Capture. Once converted, these enhancements will allow for automated routing and other process improvements, helping the insurer achieve greater efficiency. “Our prior document management solution focused primarily on storing and retrieving documents but failed to deliver advanced processing, valuable reporting or analytics capabilities,” said Jon Brower, senior vice president of information technology at North Star Mutual Insurance. “OnBase will help us achieve our automation and growth strategies by granting greater insight and visibility into our data and processes, allowing us to work more efficiently.” After completing the first phase, North Star Mutual plans to expand OnBase throughout the enterprise, focusing phase two on automating additional processes within its underwriting and claims departments and accelerating back office operations in accounts payable, expense tracking and possibly human resources. “North Star Mutual is transitioning from simply archiving documents to now activating them; turning information into insights,” said Cara McFarlane, global insurance marketing portfolio manager at Hyland. “OnBase will support the business needs of today with strategic technology that will help to continue their digital transformation trajectory into the future.” To learn why more than 600 carriers leverage OnBase for enterprise content management (ECM), case management, business process management (BPM), records management and capture needs, visit OnBase.com/Insurance. About OnBase by Hyland OnBase is a single enterprise information platform for managing content, processes and cases deployed via mobile, on-premises or in the Hyland Cloud. Providing enterprise content management (ECM), case management, business process management (BPM), records management and capture all on a single platform, OnBase transforms organizations around the globe by empowering them to become more agile, efficient and effective. Enterprise cloud-based sharing capability for the OnBase platform is available with our complementary offering, ShareBase by Hyland. Seamless integrations with policy, billing and claims management systems speed processing times across the entire insurance lifecycle from underwriting to claims, increasing the quality and efficiency of work and customer service. Using OnBase, nearly 600 carriers have achieved results by increasing profitability through accurate and consistent underwriting decisions while decreasing response times and costs associated with claims. For more information about OnBase’s solutions for the insurance industry, please visit OnBase.com/Insurance.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: phys.org

A current case in point is the burgeoning growth of additive manufacturing (AM)—the industrial equivalent of 3-D printing in which complex structures are built up by the successive addition of layers, instead of either assembling them from separate components or starting with a solid block of material from which material is successively removed, sometimes using a number of machining tools, to produce the final part. AM is already in use for fabricating a wide range of devices from medical implants to multi-material electronic components, precision fluid conduits, lamp constituents, fiber-optic connectors, and more. But the method poses problems for defect detection and quality control: The exact dimensions and fit of a device's internal features cannot readily be evaluated without destroying the device. As a result, many manufacturers have turned to a technology called x-ray computed tomography (CT), long used in medical imaging but increasingly employed over the past 15 years to examine the dimensional characteristics of commercial products. At present, however, there are very few agreed-upon standards to evaluate a CT instrument's performance or verify the accuracy of its images. That's why NIST entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with North Star Imaging (NSI) of Minnesota, a manufacturer of industrial digital x-ray and CT systems, which has loaned a CT unit to NIST for the three-year duration of the CRADA. During that time, NIST researchers can use the CT system to test measurements of candidate reference artifacts that could eventually be employed in standardized testing and calibration; at the same time, the NSI system can be characterized by exacting procedures at the nation's standards laboratory. "Right now, we're mainly involved in developing very well described reference artifacts," says project scientist Meghan Shilling of NIST's Physical Measurement Laboratory. "We take an artifact designed to evaluate the performance of a CT system and measure it using our tactile-probe coordinate measuring machines, which have extremely well-established measurement accuracy. "Then we put the artifacts in the CT system, measure them, and see how the data compare. One person on our team, who is part of the Engineering Laboratory at NIST, is making metal test structures using additive manufacturing, into which he intentionally leaves some voids, which can also be imaged using the CT system. At the same time, we're also working on characterizing North Star's machine, giving them technical feedback that may help improve their system design." "The CRADA has been extremely valuable for NSI in characterizing the system for use in the refinement and enhancement of our CT system designs," says Tucker Behrns, Engineering Manager at NSI. "We have been able to gather a wealth of information through working alongside the NIST team while gaining unbiased feedback with a focus on metrological implications. The unique measurement knowledge and skills we have access to as a result of this agreement have allowed us to gain great depth in our understanding of the critical aspects of the machine function and performance." A concurrent goal is to assist in the development of performance evaluation standards that can be promulgated worldwide. "Both NIST and NSI are active in standards organizations, including the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers," Shilling says. "Both are in the process of putting together standards for specifying CT systems. The only performance evaluation document that exists now for CT dimensional metrology is a German guideline, and the team that put together the guideline is also involved in drafting the ISO standard. Eventually, we also hope to be able to disseminate best practices and lessons learned about techniques and artifacts." CT works by projecting x-rays of appropriate energies through an object at successively varying angles. Different kinds of materials absorb or scatter more or fewer x-rays; so measuring the x-rays transmitted through a multi-featured object at different angles reveals its inner structure. In a typical medical CT scan, an x-ray source rotates continuously around the body, building up 2-D or 3-D images which reveal circulatory problems, tumors, bone irregularities, kidney and bladder stones, head injuries and many other conditions. X-ray CT for manufactured objects uses exactly the same principles. In the NSI instrument at NIST, a sample/test object is placed on a stage between the x-ray source and a detector plate. The sample revolves in a series of small angular increments around its vertical axis, and the x-ray beam passes through it, taking one frame of data at each position. Each measurement produces a single 2-D slice. Computer software integrates all of the slices and builds up a 3-D image. However, there are many complicating factors. For one thing, samples may contain both soft polymer parts and multiple hard metallic sections laid down in layers of melted or sintered powders. Each kind of material has an inherent attenuation coefficient (the ease with which x-rays pass through the material), that is dependent on the material composition and density as well as the energy spectrum of the x-ray source. NIST provides tables of x-ray mass attenuation coefficients for elements with atomic numbers from 1 to 92 for specific x-ray energies. But calculating the attenuation coefficient for multi-element compounds, such as plastics combined with metal, using a spectrum of x-ray energy, is a challenge. "We are able to vary the voltage and the current in the x-ray source," Shilling says, "and we can place various filters in front of the beam to adjust the x-ray spectrum that travels on to the target test object. So the system is very capable of measuring materials from plastics to steel." Depending on the customer's needs and the degree of detail that is wanted, a measurement run can range from half an hour to four hours or more. But how can the accuracy of those images be objectively evaluated? And what are the optimal ways to measure different materials and configurations? The answers are slowly emerging from scores of trials, and "developing the right settings is a bit of an art," Shilling says. Aside from adjusting the voltage and current in the x-ray beam and the filter material, both the distance between the x-ray source and the sample, and the sample and the detector, can be adjusted to achieve various effects. At the same time, Shilling and colleagues are also investigating aspects of the instrument that could potentially lead to measurement errors. "For example," she says, "as the vertical axis of the rotary table spins, we want to see how much the sample may move in other directions—up and down or side to side. That can affect the quality of the results. What we've been doing most recently is to characterize those motions on the most important axes of the machine." That effort requires sensitive capacitance gauges and laser interferometers that can detect extremely tiny changes in position. Those and other measurements will continue for about one more year under the terms of the CRADA. "At NSI," Behrns says, "we have seen a substantial increase in the use of additive manufacturing for production components across many of the major markets we serve. As our customers continue to expand the application of this technology, we believe that CT will play a crucial role in the identification and measurement of internal structures which is not possible with traditional methods. Working with NIST has allowed us to accelerate the advancement of CT measurement technology so that we can continue to improve our ability to serve this rapidly expanding market."


News Article | September 9, 2016
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

For the past two weeks two Washington Post reporters, Chris Mooney and Whitney Shefte, have been exploring Greenland, an enormous Arctic island that has scientists increasingly troubled as it continues to slowly melt. The two had an opportunity to tag along with a scientific team who were conducting research on the diminishing ice sheet. Over the course of their travel, Mooney and Shefte have been documenting their adventure and observations on The Washington Post’s Instagram account. Here are some of the stunning scenes they came across during their travel. [Greenland’s ice sheet is in danger. Here’s what we’re seeing on the frozen landscape.] The start of their arctic journey began in New Jersey, where the pair hopped on a C17 plane from McGuire Air Force Base and flew to Thule Air Force Base located in the northwest section of the island. There, they explored the surrounding area for a few days, snapping pictures of glaciers in the North Star Bight and near the Wolstenholme Fjord before heading up the island to one of the most northern towns in the world: Qaanaaq. After a brief respite in town, Mooney and Shefte prepared themselves for the real trek, where they would be helicopter hopping across the island with two scientists who would be conducting some research on one of the icy island’s farthest northern glaciers. A few refueling stops later, the duo finally landed on a massive floating ice shelf: that of the Petermann Glacier. The shelf itself is 10 by 30 miles in area, and one of the largest in Greenland. Mooney and Shefte followed Glaciologist Keith Nicholls and oceanographer Andreas Muenchow during their time on the massive piece of ice. As they made their way around the shelf, they uploaded more breathtaking images of the glaciers to Instagram, while providing snippets of observations within the captions. After spending a little more than a day observing the scientists on the ice, the crew hopped back across the island to get back to base. They grabbed their materials and notes to report on what they had learned while on the island, and flew off to return to Washington D.C. The report itself will be published in the upcoming weeks, as Greenland’s melting situation continues and scientists observe the islands’ decline. Mooney and Shefte also documented their excursion on Greenland in many more photos. Be sure to see what else they captured by following them on Instagram at @moonecc and @whitneyshefte. The scientific excursion was funded by the National Science Foundation, which invited the journalists to the research site and, in keeping with foundation policies, covered the costs of transportation and accommodation.


News Article | September 20, 2016
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

For the past two weeks two Washington Post reporters, Chris Mooney and Whitney Shefte, have been exploring Greenland, an enormous Arctic island that has scientists increasingly troubled as it continues to slowly melt. The two had an opportunity to tag along with a scientific team who were conducting research on the diminishing ice sheet. Over the course of their travel, Mooney and Shefte have been documenting their adventure and observations on The Washington Post’s Instagram account. Here are some of the stunning scenes they came across during their travel. [Greenland’s ice sheet is in danger. Here’s what we’re seeing on the frozen landscape.] The start of their arctic journey began in New Jersey, where the pair hopped on a C17 plane from McGuire Air Force Base and flew to Thule Air Force Base located in the northwest section of the island. There, they explored the surrounding area for a few days, snapping pictures of glaciers in the North Star Bight and near the Wolstenholme Fjord before heading up the island to one of the most northern towns in the world: Qaanaaq. After a brief respite in town, Mooney and Shefte prepared themselves for the real trek, where they would be helicopter hopping across the island with two scientists who would be conducting some research on one of the icy island’s farthest northern glaciers. A few refueling stops later, the duo finally landed on a massive floating ice shelf: that of the Petermann Glacier. The shelf itself is 10 by 30 miles in area, and one of the largest in Greenland. Mooney and Shefte followed Glaciologist Keith Nicholls and oceanographer Andreas Muenchow during their time on the massive piece of ice. As they made their way around the shelf, they uploaded more breathtaking images of the glaciers to Instagram, while providing snippets of observations within the captions. After spending a little more than a day observing the scientists on the ice, the crew hopped back across the island to get back to base. They grabbed their materials and notes to report on what they had learned while on the island, and flew off to return to Washington D.C. The report itself will be published in the upcoming weeks, as Greenland’s melting situation continues and scientists observe the islands’ decline. Mooney and Shefte also documented their excursion on Greenland in many more photos. Be sure to see what else they captured by following them on Instagram at @moonecc and @whitneyshefte. The scientific excursion was funded by the National Science Foundation, which invited the journalists to the research site and, in keeping with foundation policies, covered the costs of transportation and accommodation.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Patti Engineering, Inc., a leading control system integration company based in Auburn Hills, MI with offices in Texas and Indiana, today announced that a team of Patti Engineering employees served as judges for the Engineering Society of Detroit’s 2017 Michigan Regional Future City competition on January 23, 2017 at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi, MI. Patti Engineering presented the “Automation Technology Achievement Award” to the winning team, North Star Academy Team 2 from Marquette, MI. “Patti Engineering has a long history of community involvement, and we especially like to support great programs like Future City which teaches STEM subjects to our youth,” said Sam Hoff, founder and president of Patti Engineering. “Our employees are excited to see what the students have envisioned as cities of the future, and especially how automation technologies are represented in their models.” Patti Engineering employees judged teams on the amount of automation technology they incorporated into their city of the future, as well as their understanding of how the systems work, how they are maintained and upgraded, and how they benefit residents. The team scoring highest in these areas was North Star Academy Team 2 from Marquette, MI, and the students were presented the “Automation Technology Achievement Award” by Patti Engineering. North Star’s city of the future was on an asteroid where they mined precious metals. The model used mainly solar power but also generated electricity by harnessing the kinetic energy produced by kids swinging on swing sets. In addition to the “Automation Technology Achievement Award,” teams also competed for other special awards and to advance to the national Future City competition, held During National Engineers Week, February 18-21, 2017 in Washington, D.C. Future City is a national STEM-topic competition for teams of students in 6th, 7th and 8th grade, offered by the volunteer organization DiscoverE. The program has grown to 40,000 students participating annually. Future City teaches STEM subjects with hands-on learning, and the 2016-17 challenge is entitled “The Power of Public Spaces.” For the Future City competition, students create and are judged on a variety of deliverables to showcase their city of the future, including a virtual design, essay, physical model, presentation and project plan. Future City is a program offered by DiscoverE, a collaboration of corporations and engineering societies whose mission is “to sustain and grow a dynamic engineering profession through outreach, education, celebration and volunteerism.” Patti Engineering has a proven track record of delivering successful results across a range of industries. Customer satisfaction and project success earned the company Control Engineering Magazine’s ‘2013 System Integrator of the Year’, and placement in the Control Engineering Magazine’s Hall of Fame. The company is a CSIA Certified control system integrator and a recognized partner to many automation technology companies. Patti Engineering is a Siemens Solution Partner and an Authorized Mitsubishi Integrator, in addition to being in the integrator programs for FANUC Robotics, Phoenix Contact, Kawasaki Robotics and Indusoft. Patti Engineering, Inc. is a CSIA Certified control systems integration company offering high-caliber engineering and software development services. Patti Engineering’s technical expertise in electrical control and information systems provides turnkey control systems integration for design/build, upgrade/retrofit and asset/energy management projects. Industrial automation, production intelligence and shop floor IT solutions services include: project management, electrical engineering, hardware design, hardware procurement, software development, installation, calibration, start-up testing, verification, documentation, training and warranty support. Customer satisfaction and project success earned the company placement in the Control Engineering Magazine’s Hall of Fame. For more information, visit http://www.pattieng.com.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

APQC, the benchmarking and best practices authority (http://www.apqc.org), announced that Mardi Krenek has joined the organization as Vice President, Education. Krenek brings more than four decades of experience in process improvement and performance management, primarily in K-12 educational settings. Krenek will lead and build upon APQC’s well-regarded North Star Education practice to help districts develop strategies, redesign outdated processes, and eliminate functional silos that will empower employees and save both time and money. The efforts support the greater, shared goal of improving student achievement. “As a parent, former classroom teacher, and educational consultant, I’ve lived every aspect of K-12 education and always with an eye toward the systems and processes that make the entire district run, or in many cases falter. I credit this viewpoint to spending two decades working directly with APQC’s founder Dr. Jack Grayson earlier in my career,” noted Krenek. “I’m honored to lead APQC’s education practice and make a difference in the lives of administrators, teachers, and students by introducing process and performance management approaches.” Along with her debut, APQC has introduced a suite of education service offerings to allow districts to jumpstart improvement including organizational assessments; strategic planning; operational excellence projects; process redesign efforts; and executive coaching. APQC is also offering workshops for strategic planning, using data effectively, and process thinking. For districts seeking ongoing access to APQC research, benchmarks, and community, a new North Star Education Membership provides access for every employee and at an affordable price. “Mardi brings a unique, powerful skillset with her deep knowledge of both education and of process and performance management. Our new education service offerings are a direct result of her insights working with school districts and noting what aspects bring true, lasting value,” said Lisa Higgins, APQC’s president and chief operating officer. “We’re thrilled to welcome Mardi back to the APQC family and are eager to continue on our mission to help transform education.” ABOUT MARDI KRENEK For the past 20 years, Krenek has provided training, assessments, and consulting for school districts across the United States in roles with Krenek Consulting and the Stupski Foundation. During this time she co-developed an assessment instrument to evaluate school districts from a systems perspective. She has worked with K-12 districts throughout the United States, including significant time spent in Texas, Wyoming and Oregon. Earlier in her career, Krenek spent 23 years with APQC where she helped develop some of APQC’s signature process and performance improvement products. She played a role in creating the International Benchmarking Clearinghouse, the White House Conference on Productivity, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, and numerous reports and books on benchmarking. A graduate of Texas State University with a degree in Education and Communications, she has served as an instructor for a doctoral course on instructional leadership at the University of Texas at Austin. ABOUT APQC APQC helps organizations work smarter, faster, and with greater confidence. It is the world’s foremost authority in benchmarking, best practices, process and performance improvement, and knowledge management. A member-based nonprofit, APQC partners with more than 500 organizations worldwide in all industries. With 40 years of experience, APQC remains the world’s leader in transforming organizations. Visit http://www.apqc.org, call +1.713.681.4020, or follow http://www.twitter.com/apqc and learn how to Make Best Practices Your Practices®.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Ministers should establish a new energy commission to spur on construction of power stations because successive governments have failed to encourage enough fresh power capacity in the UK, according to a House of Lords report. Subsidy-backed growth in renewable energy projects, such as windfarms, has deterred the construction of new conventional power plants, the economic affairs committee claimed. The peers envisage the new energy commission would oversee auctions where all technologies, including fossil fuel power plants, competed for guaranteed electricity prices. The auctions would cap carbon emissions. At present the government only allows low-carbon power, such as windfarms and new nuclear power stations, to compete in auctions for such deals, known as contracts for difference. The influential cross-party group of peers concluded that successive governments have got their priorities wrong on energy policy by giving priority to carbon emissions cuts – a statutory duty under the Climate Change Act – over keeping costs down and keeping the lights on. The report has sparked an angry response. Robert Gross, director of the centre for energy policy and technology at Imperial College, London, said: “The term ‘post truth’ has become over-used. Yet it would be possible to take all the evidence the committee presents and tell a completely different story: there’s been huge success in growing renewables and reducing emissions from the power sector.” Lord Hollick, the committee’s chair, said: “We are critical of the drift that’s taken place over the last 15 years or so, which has delivered on the decarbonisation agenda but very much at the expense of consumers paying 58% more than they were in 2003. On the affordability front we haven’t looked after consumers.” However, as the report acknowledges, most of the price increases came from higher gas prices, not the 10% added by renewable energy subsidies. The peers, who include the former chancellor Norman Lamont, and a former head of the civil service, Andrew Turnbull, said security of supply should become the key aim of energy policy, above decarbonisation and cost. “Low-carbon but chronically unreliable electricity is not acceptable. Similarly very cheap prices at the expense of frequent shortages would be unacceptable,” the report says, which also claims fossil fuels have remained cheaper than renewable sources. But Paul Massara, the former chief executive of npower who now runs the renewable energy firm North Star Solar, said the committee was simply wrong to say fossil fuels were always cheaper than renewables, and condemned the report as “backward looking”. Darren Baxter, a researcher at the Institute for Public Policy Research thinktank, said: “A failure to keep the pace up with decarbonisation, as suggested in this report, would be a disaster for the north [of England] and its growing low-carbon economy.” Hollick told the Guardian that the government had micromanaged the energy market and did not need to interfere as much. He said the government “should now allow the energy commission to move forward, to run auctions, to fill the gap and to build a properly balanced [energy system]”. Hollick denied the report was anti-renewables. “Exactly the opposite. We see renewables very much as the way forward,” he said, arguing that more public money should go into R&D in renewables and energy storage. The committee also urged the government to publish its plan B if the Hinkley Point C nuclear power station, which is expected to provide 7% of the UK’s electricity from 2025, is delayed or even cancelled. Hollick said the biggest surprise during the committee’s inquiry was the “fragility” of the government’s nuclear ambitions, which envisage new nuclear reactors in Somerset, Suffolk, Anglesey and Cumbria. “It is imperative that the government publishes it contingency plans for how it will make up the capacity due to be provided by these plants in the event one or more does not succeed or is delayed,” the report says. Hollick said he expected the government’s energy back-up plan to be made up largely of new gas power stations and offshore windfarms. A spokeswoman for the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy said: “Keeping the lights on is non-negotiable. Our top priority is making sure UK families and businesses have secure, affordable energy supplies.”


NEW YORK, Feb. 27, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The groundbreaking diet book, THE SIRTFOOD DIET by nutritional medicine experts Aidan Goggins and Glen Matten, is set to be published for the first time in the United States on March 7, 2017 by North Star Way, an imprint of Simon & Schuster....


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: scienceblogs.com

“Before we devised artificial lights and atmospheric pollution and modern forms of nocturnal entertainment we watched the stars. There were practical calendar reasons of course but there was more to it than that. Even today the most jaded city dweller can be unexpectedly moved upon encountering a clear night sky studded with thousands of twinkling stars. When it happens to me after all these years it still takes my breath away.” -Carl Sagan For all of human history, we’ve battled against the limitations of our bodies and the natural world. That’s led to the development of artificial lighting: from fire to modern electric and LED lights. Despite being able to see our surroundings much more clearly at all hours regardless of the Moon or the clouds, we’ve also lost something spectacular: the night skies themselves. There are thousands of stars visible to the naked eye from a truly dark-sky location, yet such places are increasingly harder to come by. East of the Mississippi in the United States, they barely exist at all. From many urban locations, even bright, easily recognizable sights like the North Star or the Big Dipper are no longer visible. Come see what light pollution costs us every night, and learn why, if we don’t do something, the only place to get dark skies will be in space.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation celebrates Black History Month in February with a new tour that connects the ideas and innovations of those who changed the world, live music and dramatic storytelling. From boarding the bus where Rosa Parks took a stand by sitting down, to seeing the inventions and tools created by Elijah McCoy and George Washington Carver, visitors are invited to immerse themselves in the stories of these powerful visionaries who changed the world. New this year, Connect 3 Live!: African American Innovators takes visitors on a presenter-led journey through the museum based on The Henry Ford’s video series of the same name. Beginning in the museum plaza every day at 10 am and 3 pm, visitors will learn more about the innovators and ideas that changed how we live today and how they connect to one another. Inside the Driving America Drive-In Theater, visitors are invited to take part in a variety of musical and dramatic performances throughout the month including performances by the Henry Ford Academy Choir, North Star Gospel Chorale, Dave & Ernestine Hamilton and the Hamilton Family. Visitors can also take part in Minds on Freedom, a 30-minute interactive presentation that tells the story of the civil rights movement through empowering songs, speeches and images. Dramatic performances also include Ain’t I a Woman: Meet Sojourner Truth, a closer look at the woman who demanded equal rights for women and African Americans and Elijah: The Real McCoy, which gives a closer look at the fascinating inventor. Celebrate Black History at Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation is presented by Ford Motor Company Fund. For more information, please visit https://www.thehenryford.org/current-events/calendar/black-history-month-celebration/. About The Henry Ford The Henry Ford in Dearborn, Michigan is an internationally-recognized history destination that explores the American experience of innovation, resourcefulness and ingenuity that helped shape America. A national historic landmark with an unparalleled Archive of American Innovation, The Henry Ford is a force for sparking curiosity and inspiring tomorrow’s innovators. Nearly 1.8 million visitors annually experience its five attractions: Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation, Greenfield Village, Ford Rouge Factory Tour, Benson Ford Research Center and The Henry Ford Giant Screen Experience. A continually expanding array of content available online provides anytime, anywhere access. The Henry Ford is also home to Henry Ford Academy, a public charter high school which educates over 500 students a year on the institution’s campus. In 2014, The Henry Ford premiered its first-ever national television series, The Henry Ford’s Innovation Nation, showcasing present-day change-makers and The Henry Ford’s artifacts and unique visitor experiences. Hosted by news correspondent and humorist, Mo Rocca, this Emmy®-winning weekly half-hour show airs Saturday mornings on CBS. For more information please visit our website thehenryford.org.

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