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News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BC--(Marketwired - October 27, 2016) - Mission Ready Services Inc. ("Mission Ready" or the "Company") (TSX VENTURE: MRS) is pleased to announce that its subsidiary Protect The Force Inc. is the winner of the US DoD's Defense to Response (D2R) Technology Program. D2R is the Domestic Preparedness Support Initiative's (DPSI) Technology Transition Program that identifies three technologies, annually, and provides the full services of Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service's Product Development Center (TEEX PDC) to commercialize these technologies to enhance public safety and homeland security. Protect the Force traveled as one of 11 Finalists to College Station, Texas to participate in the Defense to Response Technology Showcase. After two rounds of judging, Protect the Force presented their Flex9Armor™ technology to a final panel of judges and was selected to receive $110,000 worth of services from TEEX PDC. Flex9Armor™, first developed and adopted by the U.S. Military, is comprised of a family of protective garments that provide stringent levels of ballistic protection and are simultaneously lightweight and flexible. Traditional Armor lacks coverage of the arms, chest and neck region of the body, and current additional protection for these areas adds weight and reduces mobility. Flex9Armor™ incorporates a network of NIJ Level II and IIIA body armor panels into a breathable anti-microbial material that is 30% lighter than conventional armor. Integrating all of these features into one combined garment makes Flex9Armor™ a superior option for first responders. Last year alone, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service ("TEEX") served more than 168,000 people from every U.S. state and territory and 82 countries worldwide. TEEX is a leader in the delivery of emergency response, homeland security and workforce training and exercises, technical assistance, and economic development. The Product Development Center at TEEX utilizes these resources and networks to test, develop and launch products using the proven Think, Build, Sell method. Through the D2R Program, PDC will provide Protect the Force with market intelligence, product testing and a TEEX TESTED® report, business and responder mentors, and access to investors. The Department of Defense (DoD) Domestic Preparedness Support Initiative (DPSI), in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Global Security, coordinates DoD efforts to identify, evaluate, deploy and transfer technology, items and equipment to Federal, state and local first responders. The Defense to Response Technology Program is sponsored and supported by DPSI. "We are extremely honored to have been chosen for this program and proud of a product that we believe will make a difference to the first responder community here at home and around the world," states Francisco Martinez, Chief Technology Officer, MRS. This news release contains "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. Generally, forward-looking information can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "forecast", "project", "budget", "schedule", "may", "will", "could", "might", "should" or variations of such words or similar words or expressions. Forward-looking information is based on reasonable assumptions that have been made by Mission Ready Services Inc. as at the date of such information and is subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements of Mission Ready Services Inc. to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements are based on assumptions management believes to be reasonable. Although Mission Ready Services Inc. has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in forward-looking information, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. There can be no assurance that such information will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such information. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking information. Mission Ready Services Inc. does not undertake to update any forward-looking information that is included herein, except in accordance with applicable securities laws. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

VANCOUVER, BC--(Marketwired - November 23, 2016) - Mission Ready Services Inc. ("Mission Ready" or the "Company") (TSX VENTURE: MRS) is pleased to announce the initial order and shipment of its Flex9Armor™ Tactical Police Shirt to a US County Sheriff Department SWAT unit. Developed and fulfilled through the Company's wholly-owned subsidiary, Protect The Force Inc. ("PTF"), additional Flex9Armor™ shipments are currently being prepared for a foreign military order while evaluations are underway by a number of European NATO nations. Flex9Armor™ -- jointly developed in cooperation with the U.S. Military -- is comprised of a family of protective garments that provide stringent levels of ballistic protection while maintaining exceptionally lightweight and flexible characteristics. Traditional Armor lacks coverage of the arms, chest and neck region of the body, and current additional protection for these areas adds weight and reduces mobility. Flex9Armor™ incorporates a network of NIJ Level II and IIIA body armor panels into a breathable anti-microbial material that is 30% lighter than conventional armor. Integrating all of these features into one combined garment makes Flex9Armor™ a superior option for first responders that is available in standard and fire retardant configurations. Additionally, PTF this week released a variant of the Flex9Armor™, the Flex9Spike™, designed for use by Federal, State and Local correctional facilities. In a News Release dated October 27, 2016, Mission Ready announced that PTF had won an award through the US DoD's Defense to Response (D2R) Technology Program for the provision of USD $110,000 in services from Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service's Product Development Center (TEEX PDC) to commercialize PTF's Flex9Armor™ to enhance public safety and homeland security. Protect The Force is currently working with over 70 US federal, state and local law enforcement agencies at various stages of the evaluation and purchasing process. In anticipation of a significant demand for the Flex9Armor™, PTF has streamlined its processes through a state-of-the-art online order fulfillment platform and recently launched a manufacturing division based in Jacksboro, Tennessee in order to efficiently and effectively meet client requests. More information on the PTF line of products -- including the Flex9Armor™ -- can be found at: http://protecttheforce.com/ This news release contains "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. Generally, forward-looking information can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "forecast", "project", "budget", "schedule", "may", "will", "could", "might", "should" or variations of such words or similar words or expressions. Forward-looking information is based on reasonable assumptions that have been made by Mission Ready Services Inc. as at the date of such information and is subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements of Mission Ready Services Inc. to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements are based on assumptions management believes to be reasonable. Although Mission Ready Services Inc. has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in forward-looking information, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. There can be no assurance that such information will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such information. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking information. Mission Ready Services Inc. does not undertake to update any forward-looking information that is included herein, except in accordance with applicable securities laws. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Each year, thousands of Oregon parents hug their kids goodbye and send them tramping into the wilderness for up to a week to learn about their state's natural wonders. The Outdoor School program was groundbreaking when it started more than a half-century ago. Since then, more than 1 million children have enjoyed — or endured — this rite of passage at campsites scattered from Oregon's stormy coast to its towering evergreen forests to its rugged high desert. At the program's heyday, 90 percent of sixth-graders spent the week testing water samples, studying fungi and digging through topsoil. Today, just half of Oregon's 11- and 12-year-olds take part, mostly through a patchwork of grants, fundraising, parent fees and charitable donations. Caps on property taxes, plus the recent recession, have forced many school districts to scrap the program or whittle it down to just a few days. Now, backers of a statewide ballot measure want to use a slice of lottery proceeds to guarantee a week of Outdoor School for all children. If it passes, the measure would make Oregon the only state with dedicated funding for outdoor education, including students in charter, private and home schools, said Sarah Bodor, policy director for the North American Association for Environmental Education. Opponents, however, say its passage would mean deep cuts to a state agency tasked with economic development by siphoning away millions in lottery money critical to expanding Oregon business. And at least one outspoken state lawmaker worries Measure 99 would impose liberal Portland's values on children in rural Oregon where farming, mining, logging and fishing are a way of life. The push to fund Outdoor School dovetails with a national trend toward outdoor learning, Bodor said. More than two dozen states have developed environmental literacy plans as educators realize the importance of outdoor time for developing critical thinking and leadership skills, she said. "But these are really unfunded mandates and ... the outdoor component is the piece that very often gets left behind," Bodor said. Measure 99 would cover that unfunded cost by taking up to $22 million — or 4 percent a quarter — from the state lottery's economic development fund to send 50,000 fifth- or sixth-graders to Outdoor School each year. The Oregon State University Extension Service would dole out the money to school districts using a process that will be determined if the measure passes. Applying for the lottery funds would be voluntary, and schools, educational districts and nonprofits that already run Outdoor Schools around the state could continue to do so. To get the state funding, programs would have to meet certain criteria, including a curriculum that includes the study of plants, animals, soil and water; discussion of the role of natural resources in the state economy; and lessons on the relationship between economic growth, natural resources and conservation. "This is not a mandate — it's an offer. And we wanted to make sure it was a real one, which means providing sufficient funding to cover the cost of a good, high-quality program," said Rex Burkholder, chairman of the Measure 99 campaign committee. With two weeks to go before the election, Measure 99 has no organized opposition, and polls indicate it will pass — but not everyone is buying it. State Sen. Betsy Johnson, a Democrat who represents a rural district northwest of Portland, says lottery proceeds are for economic development, not camp. She worries Oregonians who remember their own Outdoor School experience will vote for the measure out of nostalgia without understanding it could hurt other programs. Economic Development for Central Oregon, a nonprofit that promotes job growth, says the money for Outdoor School would be equivalent to 70 percent of the budget for the state's economic development agency, which relies on lottery money. Efforts to bring television productions like "Grimm," ''Leverage" and "Portlandia" to Oregon could suffer as a result, it said. "It's so feel-good, it's so 'Oregon' that I just worry that people are not going to give it the level of scrutiny it deserves," Johnson said. "The assumption is Outdoor School ... will produce better citizens and good Oregonians. What's my metric to know if that really happens?" Supporters point to a Portland State University study that found students who participated in Outdoor School had improved attendance. They also highlight surveys by the Multnomah Education Service District — which provides 7,000 students a year with Outdoor School — that show the program boosts self-confidence and interest in math and science. At a recent five-day camp in Mount Hood National Forest, sixth-graders from Portland's Jackson Middle School seemed unaware of the politics surrounding their adventure. As a light drizzle fell, they dipped nets into a fog-cloaked pond surrounded by stands of Douglas fir trees, sketched water bugs in notebooks and tested the water's acidity and turbidity as rainbow trout jumped just a few feet away. Each child wore a "wood cookie" — a cross-section of a small log — emblazoned with their name and cabin assignment and decorated with beaded pins to denote their completion of field studies on plants, animals, soil and water. "It's definitely better out here," said 11-year-old Maya Herring, showing off her wood cookie festooned with beads and bling awarded by her counselor. "You can actually feel the nature. It's not just saying, 'This is what this fern looks like.' You can actually feel the fern for yourself."


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

COLLEGE STATION -- A turfgrass disease that looked like an ink spill on many southern golf courses has been identified and all but blotted out, according to a plant pathologist with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. The disease, which occurs on short-cut Bermuda and Zoysia grasses, had golf course superintendents from Texas to Florida "scared," Dr. Young-Ki Jo said, because it ruined the aesthetic looks of their fairways and greens, which could have some players teed-off. Ultimately, through lab tests and DNA sequence comparisons, the researchers found the pathogen was a new species of fungal disease, which they named Curvularia malina. Their finding was published in a recent edition of the journal Mycologia. Jo and his counterpart Dr. Maria Tomaso-Peterson at Mississippi State University independently were examining samples of the infected grasses from various courses and, when they compared notes, agreed that the responsible pathogen was not known to scientists. "Fungi is a common culprit of turf disease. So we isolated and cultured them for identification," Jo said. They also poured over reports of similar fungal diseases and found similarities on various courses in Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Florida and even in Japan and China, yet it remained unnamed and with few details about its life cycle. "If we don't know the biology of a fungus, there is no management protocol," Jo explained. "So of course the golf course superintendents' first response is to be scared that the disease will take over the course." In Texas alone, there are some 1,000 golf courses with a total of about 115,000 acres, according to the Texas Water Resources Institute. Jo said it's costly to apply fungicides, especially if there is no idea whether it will work. With about 40 acres per course in fairways, putting greens and tees, the cost could easily reach $5,000 to spray a product that might not even work against the fungus. Besides, because it was a previously unknown species, no product was labeled for legal use against the fungus. "You can spend a lot of time and money and still not manage a disease," he said. "Proper diagnosis is a really critical thing." With extensive testing, and by comparing results from scientific databases online, the team was able to sequence and examine three genes and place the fungi in the Curvularia group. They named the new species malina, from the Sanskrit word for "dirty or stained," because of its dark brown to black splotches in the turf. In further field tests, the team found a fungicide that can be used preventively or to treat infected areas at the time of year it is most likely to appear, which is on short-cut grass in the more humid seasons of southern spring and fall. "The fungi is only observed on golf course fairways, putting greens or tees," Jo said. "It may be in grass with longer mowing heights but the distinctive symptoms just don't show up there." Though grass with the inky disease turns dark with leaves that get mushy, the condition clears up with drier summer weather, he said. It commonly is spread possibly by mowing equipment or with aeration, a common management technique that pulls plugs of grassy soil out to help the turf get water and nutrients better. "Luckily this fungal disease does not completely kill the grasses. The roots are still alive, and the crown is still alive, so if you apply proper treatments the the grass will recover," the plant pathologist said. "But there can be lot of black spots, which really reduce the aesthetic quality and playability of the turf. "We don't have the knowledge or ability to eliminate the fungi, but we can manage the disease under the threshold levels that cause turf damage," he said. "It's really important to have a proper diagnosis, because once you know what the disease is, the management practice can be totally different. Knowing the culprit is the first step."


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A turfgrass disease that looked like an ink spill on many southern golf courses has been identified and all but blotted out, according to a plant pathologist with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. The disease, which occurs on short-cut Bermuda and Zoysia grasses, had golf course superintendents from Texas to Florida "scared," Dr. Young-Ki Jo said, because it ruined the aesthetic looks of their fairways and greens, which could have some players teed-off. Jo and his counterpart Dr. Maria Tomaso-Peterson at Mississippi State University independently were examining samples of the infected grasses from various courses and, when they compared notes, agreed that the responsible pathogen was not known to scientists. Ultimately, through lab tests and DNA sequence comparisons, the researchers found the pathogen was a new species of fungal disease, which they named Curvularia malina. Their finding was published in a recent edition of the journal Mycologia. "Fungi is a common culprit of turf disease. So we isolated and cultured them for identification," Jo said. They also poured over reports of similar fungal diseases and found similarities on various courses in Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Florida and even in Japan and China, yet it remained unnamed and with few details about its life cycle. "If we don't know the biology of a fungus, there is no management protocol," Jo explained. "So of course the golf course superintendents' first response is to be scared that the disease will take over the course." In Texas alone, there are some 1,000 golf courses with a total of about 115,000 acres, according to the Texas Water Resources Institute. Jo said it's costly to apply fungicides, especially if there is no idea whether it will work. With about 40 acres per course in fairways, putting greens and tees, the cost could easily reach $5,000 to spray a product that might not even work against the fungus. Besides, because it was a previously unknown species, no product was labeled for legal use against the fungus. "You can spend a lot of time and money and still not manage a disease," he said. "Proper diagnosis is a really critical thing." With extensive testing, and by comparing results from scientific databases online, the team was able to sequence and examine three genes and place the fungi in the Curvularia group. They named the new species malina, from the Sanskrit word for "dirty or stained," because of its dark brown to black splotches in the turf. In further field tests, the team found a fungicide that can be used preventively or to treat infected areas at the time of year it is most likely to appear, which is on short-cut grass in the more humid seasons of southern spring and fall. "The fungi is only observed on golf course fairways, putting greens or tees," Jo said. "It may be in grass with longer mowing heights but the distinctive symptoms just don't show up there." Though grass with the inky disease turns dark with leaves that get mushy, the condition clears up with drier summer weather, he said. It commonly is spread possibly by mowing equipment or with aeration, a common management technique that pulls plugs of grassy soil out to help the turf get water and nutrients better. "Luckily this fungal disease does not completely kill the grasses. The roots are still alive, and the crown is still alive, so if you apply proper treatments the the grass will recover," the plant pathologist said. "But there can be lot of black spots, which really reduce the aesthetic quality and playability of the turf. "We don't have the knowledge or ability to eliminate the fungi, but we can manage the disease under the threshold levels that cause turf damage," he said. "It's really important to have a proper diagnosis, because once you know what the disease is, the management practice can be totally different. Knowing the culprit is the first step."


VANCOUVER, BC--(Marketwired - November 29, 2016) - Mission Ready Services Inc. ("Mission Ready" or the "Company") (TSX VENTURE: MRS) announces that its quarterly unaudited financial statements, related Management's Discussion & Analysis ("MD&A") and National Instrument ("NI") 52-109FV2 reports for the period ended September 30, 2016 were filed on SEDAR on November 29, 2016 and can be viewed at http://www.sedar.com. For the nine months ended September 30, 2016 the Company's gross revenues decreased by $3.4 million to $3.6 million (2015 - $7.1 million), a 49% decrease over the same period in the prior year. This decrease is due to a one-time $4.2 million contract the company performed for the US Marines that was completed in the fall of 2015. The lower gross revenues of the Company's Cleaning and Remediation division was partially offset by increased revenues of the Research Development & Manufacturer Representation divisions and the start of revenues generated by the Manufacturing division. Total expenses included in determining Income (Loss) Before Other Items decreased 28% to $4.8 million from $6.6 million. Income Before Other items decreased by $1.6 million from income in 2015 of $0.48 million to a loss of $1.14 million in 2016. The decrease in revenues and expenses is primarily due to the Company's performance of the previously mentioned one year contract for the US Marines in 2015 partially offset by the initial set up costs of the Company's new manufacturing facility. Flex9Armor™ Manufacturing Begins A key focus of the Company is on its proprietary Flex9Armor™ base layer shirt for law enforcement agencies and foreign militaries. The Company recently completed its first shipment of shirts to a US County SWAT team. Additional Flex9Armor™ shipments are currently being prepared for a foreign military order while evaluations are underway by a number of European NATO nations. Acquisition of NIJ Ballistic Certifications With the acquisition of certain manufacturing assets, trademark, customer list and 23 certifications of models that Comply with the U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice ("NIJ") standard-0101.06 for ballistic-resistance of body armor of ForceOne, LLC, the Flex9Armor™ and other PTF ballistic products are now being manufactured at the Company's recently launched manufacturing facility based in Campbell County, Tennessee -- a designated HUBZone (Historically Underutilized Business Zone). Winner of TEEX Award The Company recently won an award through the US DoD's Defense to Response (D2R) Technology Program for the provision of USD $110,000 in services from Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service's Product Development Center (TEEX PDC) to commercialize PTF's Flex9Armor™ to enhance public safety and homeland security. About Mission Ready MRSI's mission is to save lives and enhance the performance of military personnel, first responders, and those who protect us by working to ensure they are equipped with the best possible personal protective equipment. Headquartered in Vancouver, BC, Mission Ready has three distinct, synergistic operating divisions: Mission Ready's management team offers over 100 years of combined industry experience and is composed of industry experts in developing products, contracting, and selling to the federal government, first responders and tactical markets through open market procurements, teaming arrangements, and a variety of federal contract tools. This news release contains "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. Generally, forward-looking information can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "forecast", "project", "budget", "schedule", "may", "will", "could", "might", "should" or variations of such words or similar words or expressions. Forward-looking information is based on reasonable assumptions that have been made by Mission Ready Services Inc. as at the date of such information and is subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements of Mission Ready Services Inc. to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements are based on assumptions management believes to be reasonable. Although Mission Ready Services Inc. has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in forward-looking information, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. There can be no assurance that such information will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such information. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking information. Mission Ready Services Inc. does not undertake to update any forward-looking information that is included herein, except in accordance with applicable securities laws. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


Texas has a new plan for its 2.5 million feral hogs: total annihilation. Sid Miller, the state's agriculture commissioner, just approved a pesticide — called "Kaput Feral Hog Lure" — for statewide use. "The 'hog apocalypse' may finally be on the horizon," Miller said in a statement on Tuesday. SEE ALSO: First human-pig chimeras created, sparking hopes for transplantable organs — and debate "This solution is long overdue," he added. "Wild hogs have caused extensive damage to Texas lands and loss of income for many, many years." Texas's agriculture commission estimates that feral hogs cause $52 million in damage each year to agricultural businesses by tearing up crops and pastures, knocking down fences and ruining equipment. The so-called hog lure is derived from warfarin, a blood-thinning agent that's also used to kill rats and mice in homes and buildings. Animals don't die immediately from eating the odorless, tasteless chemical. That would be too kind. Instead, they keep eating it until the anti-clotting properties cause them to bleed to death internally. This week, Miller approved a rule change in the Texas Administrative Code that allows landowners and agricultural producers to use Kaput — essentially warfarin-laced pellets — to keep feral hogs off their property. Proponents of the hog toxicant, including the Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service, say it's an effective tool because it's only strong enough to kill the swine, and not other wildlife populations or livestock. In January, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency registered Kaput's hog bait under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, a move that made the product available for general use. Still, environmentalists and hog hunters alike staunchly oppose using warfarin to stamp out Texas's feral pig problem. Pigs poop, after all, and other animals could ingest the warfarin along the way. Some Texans hunt the pigs for sport and food, and they're worried about eating poisoned swine. "For Texas to introduce a poison into the equation is a bad decision in our opinion and could likely contaminate humans who unknowingly process and eat feral hogs," the Texas Hog Hunters Association said in a Change.org petition to block the rule change. MIke and his big ole boar from yesterday. Lamar county Texas https://t.co/jQoS5JbtnQ pic.twitter.com/2SeAKs7zbh Louisiana might become the next state to use Kaput to quell its feral hog population, which worries state wildlife veterinarian Jim LaCour. He said local black bears and raccoons could easily lift the lid to the cages containing the warfarin-laced pellets. "We do have very serious concerns about non-target species," LaCour told the Times-Picayune in New Orleans.  "When the hogs eat, they're going to drop crumbs on the outside, where small rodents can get them and not only intoxicate themselves but also birds of prey that eat them. Since the poison will be on the landscape for weeks on end, the chances of these birds eating multiple affected animals is pretty good," he told the newspaper. The pesticide's manufacturer, Scimetrics Ltd. Corp., assures the pesticide is safe for humans and wildlife — just not for feral pigs.  For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

BOGOTA, COLOMBIA--(Marketwired - Dec 16, 2016) -  Café de Colombia aims at being 100% sustainable by 2027, when the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation (FNC) will become a centenary institution. The initiative arises in response to falling premiums for sustainable coffee due to an increase of supply and seeks to take advantage of the differentiating attributes and values of Colombian coffee as a way to improve producers' income. The institutional efforts so far have enable to have 212,000 coffee farms complying with a sustainability standard, accounting for over 165,000 coffee farmers (30% of the total) on 396,000 hectares (42% of the total). "We are going to adopt much of what we have today and have implemented in the last 15 years on sustainability. We have the institutional basis to carry this out in the next 10 years," said the FNC Chief Commercial Officer, Felipe Robayo, in the 83rd National Congress of Coffee Growers. The strategy until now has been identifying regional features that make it easier to meet requirements of the different sustainability standards, supporting producers via the Extension Service for adoption of good practices, and accompanying compliance audits for farms to be certified and/or verified. It is no coincidence that the FNC is already managing the largest sustainability programs in the world for 4C and Nespresso. "We are a leader in that worldwide," Robayo noted. The definition of an own sustainability standard for Café de Colombia, which must be credible, innovative, reliable and voluntary, will include the highly democratic and participatory nature of Colombian coffee institutions, something very valued in the country and abroad. Public goods and services that benefit the whole of producers, such as the purchase guarantee (a form of transparent and fair trade), scientific and technological research, and technical assistance by the Extension Service are competitive advantages in the industry and differentiating values that contribute to sustainability of Colombian coffee farming, something that the own standard of Café de Colombia being defined will also take into account. Café de Colombia is already a synonym of quality in the industry, but thanks to its redefined strategy it aims to achieve a 100%-sustainable coffee farming. 100%-Sustainable Café de Colombia will be a code of conduct enabling to show stakeholders (customers, industry, buyers, Governments, academia, etc.) that the processes and products verified under this scheme meet the principles of sustainability.


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: phys.org

"On the Texas High Plains, forage sorghums are a very good fit with the livestock industry, especially as dairy and beef cattle forage needs increase at the same time as we become water-limited across the Ogallala Aquifer region," said Dr. Jourdan Bell, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agronomist in Amarillo. Forage sorghums are a drought-tolerant, water-efficient alternative to corn, Bell said. "While corn is often the silage of choice because of its feed value, forage sorghums have a feed value 80 to 90 percent of corn, if managed properly," she said. "However, producers are recognizing that we are really going to have to manage our forage sorghums for optimum quality and production, even more so now with the additional concerns about the sugarcane aphid." Bell said the data from the forage sorghum trials on a cooperative farmer's land near Bushland will be unique because she is working with Dr. Ed Bynum, AgriLife Extension entomologist, and Dr. Ted McCollum, AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist, to evaluate the effect of the sugarcane aphid pressure on forage sorghum production and quality. "There is such a vast difference in production and quality between sorghum types and hybrids, so it's really important that we evaluate different forage sorghums specifically for silage to help producers optimize not only their production with regards to tonnage but also the quality at harvest." That's where the value of the forage sorghum trial, currently in its third year, comes in, Bell said. Her work is a continuation of long-term research conducted at Bushland for over 15 years. The Bushland forage sorghum trial includes over 100 different sorghum hybrids, including forage and grain sorghum types. Measurements are being taken for yield and quality at harvest, she said. While finished silage is ultimately a result of the product used, it is important the end users recognize that the quality of the silage also can be affected by their management. Bell, who also has a Texas A&M AgriLife Research appointment, is conducting a secondary study, funded by the Texas Grain Sorghum Board, to evaluate ensiling duration with a select forage sorghum. She will be aided in the research by a West Texas A&M University graduate student. "We are looking at forage that has been ensiled for 30, 60 and 120 days to optimize the feed value—both digestibility and carbohydrate availability—for a forage sorghum that has been processed with both a cracked and uncracked berry." Another area of concern for the end user is the grain processing, she said. Often times the sorghum berry is not cracked when it is ensiled, which can reduce the feed value and the carbohydrate availability. "So we are looking at forages where the berry has been cracked as well as where it has been unprocessed, so we can see how ensiling duration might affect the feed value," Bell said. "Ultimately, the silage is only going to be as good as the forage that was used and how that was managed." One added challenge this year has been sugarcane aphids, she said. "We have sprayed sugarcane aphids twice throughout the growing season, however, there is concern that there are potential reductions in both yield and quality. So we have a very timely opportunity to evaluate its effect on production and quality of the forage." Bell said several different forage sorghum hybrids have been infested at different levels with sugarcane aphids, and will be ensiled to determine the effect of sugarcane aphid level of infestation on that end-use product. "That's something that is very unique," she said. "At this time, there is nobody else who will have that data." Bell reminded producers that just because forage sorghums are drought tolerant, that does not necessarily mean they can avoid irrigation. Forage sorghums managed for optimum production can use three-tenths to four-tenths of an inch of water per day at periods of peak water demand on the Texas High Plains. "So it is up to the producer to determine what their yield goal is, what maturity class they need to plant and how they are going to manage that crop to optimize production," she said. "Of course, with that, they need to know what their end user wants – just roughage or something with a greater feed value." Bell said harvest continues on the forage sorghum trial, with results expected in a month or so. The optimum harvest for forage sorghums is at soft dough, but this trial includes multiple maturity classes and forage types. They range from early maturing hybrids to the photoperiod-sensitive hybrids that do not initiate heading until the day length is less than 12.5 hours, or around mid-October on the Texas High Plains. "This has really extended the harvest times and slightly delayed the complete data collection," she said. Explore further: Sorghum silage a suitable alternative to corn silage, with proper management


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

COLLEGE STATION, TX, February 15, 2017-- Christopher C. Mathewson is a celebrated Marquis Who's Who biographee. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Marquis Who's Who, the world's premier publisher of biographical profiles, is proud to name Dr. Mathewson a Lifetime Achiever. An accomplished listee, Dr. Mathewson celebrates many years' experience in his professional network, and has been noted for achievements, leadership qualities, and the credentials and successes he has accrued in his field.Dr. Mathewson is a senior training specialist, engineer, geologist and educator for the Texas Engineering Extension Service.In addition to his status as a Lifetime Achiever, Dr. Mathewson has been featured in numerous Marquis Who's Who publications, including Who's Who in the World, Who's Who in the South and Southwest, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, Who's Who in America, Who's Who in Finance and Business.In recognition of outstanding contributions to his profession and the Marquis Who's Who community, Dr. Mathewson has been featured on the Marquis Who's Who Lifetime Achievers website. Please visit http://whoswholifetimeachievers.com/2017/01/04/christopher-mathewson/ to view this distinguished honor.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com

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