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Da Silva F.R.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul | Erdtmann B.,University of Caxias do Sul | Dalpiaz T.,Lutheran University of Brazil | Nunes E.,Lutheran University of Brazil | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Tobacco farmers are routinely exposed to complex mixtures of the compounds present in tobacco leaves, including organic and inorganic pesticides. Penetration through skin is the most significant route of uptake in occupational exposure to chemicals, including dust and liquids containing toxic and carcinogenic substances. This study evaluates the genotoxic effect of tobacco leaves with and without dermal exposure to flumetralin in Mus musculus, determining cell damage by the micronucleus test and the Comet assay as well as antioxidant enzyme activities and hematologic parameters. Nicotine was used as positive control. Blood samples were collected for 0, 3, 24 and 48 h exposure periods, and DNA damage by Comet assay and micronucleus test was evaluated for all these periods. Bone marrow and liver cells were also evaluated for the 48 h exposure period. Significant differences between Comet assay results in blood cells from animals exposed to tobacco leaves with and without pesticide were found in 24 and 48 h exposure periods in relation to negative control. Bone marrow cells from the group exposed to leaves with pesticide (48 h) also demonstrated significant increase in DNA damage. Concerning the micronucleus test, only animals exposed to tobacco leaves without pesticide (24 h) showed increase in frequency of micronuclei when compared to the negative control. Oxidative stress activities also were demonstrated for different groups. The results demonstrate the injury effect caused by tobacco leaves in different Mus musculus tissues, suggesting that the effects of dermal exposure to tobacco leaves are caused by complex mixtures present in the plant, but mainly by nicotine. © 2010 American Chemical Society. Source

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