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Patent
EXP Inc | Date: 2016-11-09

There are provided methods for treating a gas having an undesirable odor. The methods comprise contacting the gas with an acidic aqueous oxidizing composition having a pH of about 2.0 to about 3.0 and comprising at least one cation of a metal; a sequestering agent; and H_(2)O_(2 )and submitting the gas and the composition to UV radiation when the gas and the composition are contacting each other, wherein the treatment permits to reduce by at least 60% intensity of the undesirable odor.


« Bentley brings electric EXP 12 Speed 6e concept to Auto Shanghai | Main | NIO unveils production electric SUV for China market; NIO ES8 to launch end of this year » A brain study by researchers from Toyota Central R&D Laboratories, along with a colleague from Japan’s National Institute of Physiological Sciences, has found that drivers show significantly greater gray matter (GM) volume in the left cerebellar hemisphere—which has been associated with cognitive rather than motor functioning—than non-drivers. An open access paper on their work is published in the journal Scientific Reports. Previous neuroimaging studies have found multiple brain areas associated with distinct aspects of car driving in simulated traffic environments. Few studies, however, have examined brain morphology associated with everyday car-driving experience in real traffic, the researchers said. Their goal was to identify gray matter volume differences between drivers and non-drivers. Driving is a complex everyday activity that requires multiple types of sensory processing, cost-weighted decision making, precise motor control, and other abilities. Even on an empty road, drivers must continuously operate the steering wheel and pedals in consideration of complicated vehicle dynamics. Driving is also a vigilance task, which is often undertaken for prolonged periods of time, and carries a constant risk of injury or death resulting from collisions. Despite this, driving is commonly thought to provide pleasure, at least, in certain circumstances or among car enthusiasts. Each of these features shapes the peculiarities of car driving in everyday life experiences. It is widely accepted that experience can alter the structure of the brain. … it is highly likely that everyday car-driving experience modulates the structure of specific brain regions associated with the demands of driving a car in real traffic. However, few studies have investigated brain morphology associated with car-driving experience. The team recruited university students with either a few years’ or no driving experience and collected structural brain images for a whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis to examine between-group differences in regional gray matter volume. The whole-brain VBM analysis found brain regions showing greater GM volume (adjusted for age) in drivers compared to non-drivers; no brain areas showed a significantly larger GM volume in non-drivers compared with drivers. Within the limitations of cross-sectional investigation, the current results demonstrate that a few years of car-driving experience in real traffic is associated with greater GM volume in the left cerebellar hemisphere. However, it is not possible to completely rule out hidden factors confounded with car-driving experience. Any activities and experiences concomitant with the selection of the primary transportation mode (i.e., to use or not use a car) are potential confounding factors between drivers and non-drivers. In that respect, the most obvious limitation of this study is that transportation modes in non-drivers were not fully assessed. Accordingly, given the results of the present study, we cannot specify which aspects of car driving are associated with left cerebellar GM increase. In addition, larger cerebellar GM volume might foster more interest in car driving, rather than be a consequence of car-driving experience. To overcome these limitations, it is desirable to conduct a larger sample, randomized longitudinal study that collects detailed information regarding not only frequency and type of usage of cars in drivers but also transportation modes in non-drivers, as well as the concomitant activities and experiences in both groups.


DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Eagle Materials Inc. (NYSE: EXP) will release financial results for the fourth quarter and fiscal 2017 ended March 31, 2017, on Thursday, May 18, 2017, before the open of the NYSE and will host an investor conference call the same day, Thursday, May 18, 2017, at 8:30 am Eastern Time (7:30 am Central Time). To participate in the call, please dial (866) 410-5364 (US & Canada). International callers should dial (704) 908-0288. The conference ID is: 8129332. The call is being webcast by Nasdaq OMX and can be accessed at the Eagle Materials website at www.eaglematerials.com. An archive of the webcast will be available on the site’s Investor Relations page. Eagle Materials Inc. manufactures and distributes Cement, Gypsum Wallboard, Recycled Paperboard, Concrete and Aggregates, and Oil and Gas Proppants from 40 facilities across the US. Eagle is headquartered in Dallas, Texas.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Baidu opening up its autonomous driving platform; leveraging AI capabilities | Main | Toyota R&D study finds drivers show significantly more gray matter in brain regions than non-drivers » Bentley brought its electic EXP 12 Speed 6e concept, first unveiled at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show last month (earlier post), to Auto Shanghai. The concept showcases the British brand’s ambition to define the electric luxury segment and will allow Bentley to gauge public opinion and customer feedback to help shape its future luxury strategy. Bentley is fully committed to China—it is a vital market for us. We are focusing on developing an electric model in the future which will meet the luxury mobility needs of customers here and right around the world. Bentley’s vision is for customers to benefit from high-speed inductive charging and provide a range sufficient for grand touring requirements. An electric Bentley would, for example, be able to drive between London and Paris or Milan and Monaco on a single charge and the on board experience will be enhanced for both driver and passenger thanks to the integration of state-of-the-art technology. Bentley believes that the concept will open discussions with luxury car buyers of the future—millennials, members of Generation C and the rising affluent in developing economies—to understand the desired expectations from a future electric luxury car ownership experience. The luxury brand’s electric car strategy includes the introduction of PHEV models across the Bentley model range over the next few years, starting with the Bentayga in 2018.


Patent
EXP Inc and Uniboard Canada Inc. | Date: 2012-05-03

There is provided an adhesive comprising chitosan an optionally a crosslinking agent. A method for preparing such an adhesive is also disclosed. A wood-panel made with such an adhesive is also provided. Moreover, a method for manufacturing a wood-based panel is provided. The method comprises preparing a mixture comprising wood, chitosan, optionally a crosslinking agent, and optionally an acid, forming a mat with the mixture, and pressing the mat under heat and pressure so as to obtain the wood-based panel.


Patent
EXP Inc | Date: 2015-08-26

There are provided methods for treating a fluid having an undesirable odor. The methods comprise contacting the fluid with a H_(2)O_(2 )basic aqueous oxidizing composition and/or with a H_(2)O_(2 )acidic aqueous oxidizing composition. Optionally, the fluid can be further treated by contacting it with activated carbon and/or by submitting the fluid and the composition to UV radiation when they are contacting together.


News Article | April 11, 2012
Site: venturebeat.com

That may be true, but gaming sure does, especially in the world of RTS games. Over the years, this genre has started to split into multiple sub-genres, from the normal old-school base building RTS games, including the likes of Starcraft, Company of Heroes and the Command and Conquer series, to the newer more action orientated RTS games, including the likes of World in Conflict, and now Eugen Systems (developers of R.U.S.E) latest release, Wargame: European Escalation. Wargame: European Escalation puts you directly in the shoes (or combat boots) of a commander of either NATO or Warsaw Pact forces, lead by the United States and the USSR respectively, during a fictional escalation of the Cold War taking place in the 1970s to early 1980s.The fighting in the game focuses on land engagements in Europe, with most of the maps, being some variation of "Northern European summer countryside", but this by no means a bad thing, as these maps fit the gameplay, and still contain just enough variation to keep them interesting. While both the Air Force and the Navy are absent from the battlefield in this game, this does not take anything away from the massive battles on screen as the massive amount of different units (361 per side) include everything you could ever want when taking on an enemy battalion. The units all fall into one of several categories, including Tank, Helicopters, Recon, Support, Logistics and Vehicles. This may seem overwhelming, but each type of unit has a very specific role on the battlefield, so it easily falls into place. Each unit has also been maliciously modeled with great attention to detail, as well as different armor values for different parts of the vehicles. “Unit card for the Leopard 1A4, one of the early NATO tanks” The main addition to Wargame: European Escalation that sets it out from the rest of the games in the RTS market is it's "Deck" system. Much like any trading card game, you have to start out by creating your deck. This deck can consist of up to 25 different units, of any type and combination. 25 different units may not sound like much, but every variation of a unit still counts as just the one (for example M1 Abrams, M1IP and M1A1 all count as a single unit). On top of this, one can create several decks for each faction, to accomodate a variety of play styles and match types (1v1 – 4v4). Units are unlocked through command stars, that can both be unlocked through the campaign, by completing missions and secondary objectives, but also through multiplayer, where one will gain several command stars each time one gains a level. These levels are gain through EXP, which in turn is gained by both wins and losses, so this means that the good players and early adopters do not have a monopoly on the good units. Due to this, the unlocks do not really effect the games balance, as you usually only need to level up a few times before you have enough stars to create a deck that is on par with anything the enemies can throw at you. Although, if you are the type who doesn't like to pick a where you are the underdog, no matter how slight, the option is always there to cut your teeth against bots first, with multiple difficulty settings, or play some of the well balanced, if a little challenging campaign to earn the command stars to get the unlocks you want, before taking on the rest of the world. Moving on to the actual gameplay, one will find that it is actually very simple, and can possibly be compared to World In Conflict, if you increased the scale, slowed down the pace, reduced the frustration and removed "Off map support assets". It very much features the same concept, of deploying your units at the start of the match and then receiving command points from controlling various points across the map, which can be used to call in reinforcements. This is differentiated by there being two different types of control points, "control points" which grant you a certain amount of command points every few seconds, and "reinforcement points" which provide you with a point to bring units onto the field. Though out the battle, you gain points (score) by destroying enemy units. The amount of points is depends on the cost of said unit, so destroying 1 expensive unit is worth more that destroying 3 cheap ones. On top of this, there are only two different victory conditions in the game, point limit and a time limit. This main sound like a very limiting factor, but due to the nature of the game, it works perfectly. At the moment there are three ways of playing the game, “Campaign”, “Skirmish”, and “Multiplayer”. There are four different campaigns, two for each faction, each lasting around 4-5 missions. The story is your basic “Cold War gone hot” scenario without many twists, but what makes it interesting is the level of challenge the AI offers, as well as the persistent aspect. As you progress through the missions of a campaign, you can unlock more units to deploy, but be warned, any units you lose will be lost for the remainder of that campaign, meaning a costly victory in one of the early missions can mean that it can be almost impossible to beat the later ones. This forces you to play things safe, and thing about your decisions. The skirmish mode is the weakest link in the package at the moment with only one on one play for the time being (Co-op, “Comp-Stomp” is being added in a patch). The AI has 3 difficulties in skirmish, but there is little reason to play it, as you are not awarded command stars for you efforts. Multiplayer is the real meat of the experience, with an active and relatively nice community, with thousands of games being played a day at the time of writing this. Multiplayer allows you to play anything from 1v1 to 4v4, and even allows you to unbalance the teams (for example 1v4), to give skilled players a unique challenge. "  in the middle of the map, and  with the arrows." The actual gameplay also works very well with the setting and the game, as this game is more about your choice of units and tactics than your APM. This is in part due to the massive scale of the battles, but also due to the fact that you do not have that much control over your units. For example, when moving tanks, you cannot decide which direction the face, like in many other RTS games, but thankfully the AI is generally smart and will turn to face any threats, as well as turn to face the most logical direction, most of the time. “Most of the time” being the key word in the previous sentence, as the AI sometimes decides that a single unarmed transport is a bigger threat than 12 Soviet T-80 tanks barreling towards them. As one progresses through a battle, logistics will start to play a larger part in the overall engagement, as it is required to rearm and refuel unit regularly, if you want them to operate to their full potential. This is done through the use of FOB, which are placed at the start of the game, for a point cost, and supply vehicles which can be called in, just like fighting units. This extra mechanic really adds a new layer of depth to the gameplay, by forcing you to keep your supply lines secure, if you don’t want your offensive to grind to a halt. The main problem with this system comes when you play with an evenly skilled player, with balanced units, as this sometimes causes the game to turn into a textbook war of attrition, leaving you praying that his FOB will run dry before yours. The presentation of the game is truly stunning, for the massive scale, with units being modeled in great detail, with explosions and gunfire instantly drawing your attention to where the action is. The extremely streamlined HUD and lack of loud, out of place music really increases the immersion, and after a few hours, you’ll find yourself believing that you really are a General. While the graphics are great, you will rarely see the details, as you are mostly going to play with the camera zoomed out, so that you can get a full overview of the battles. This sometimes results in a few rendering issues on some machines, but Eugen is working to patch this as soon as possible. After playing this game for over 75 hours, since it’s release, I only have two issues with this game, they can be classed as minor or major, depending on how you look at it and what type of person you are. The first being the fact that this game comes with added DRM, on top of Steam, which limits the game to five installs, while this is not a problem for me and the DRM has not bothered me the slightest, I know some people may have problems with this, especially seeing as it is based on the notoriously poor “Starforce” DRM. The second thing that bugs me with this game is the way that unit grouping works, if you tell multiple different units to move to one location, they will not do so at the same speed. Faster units will leave slower ones behind, which can result in a lose, if you are not completely focused, as it may lead to AA vehicles being left behind causing tanks to die, or worse, all you logistics vehicles storming ahead only to be captured or destroyed by the enemy, leaving an entire army stranded halfway to their destination with no fuel, just waiting to be destroyed. Though it causes a few problems here and there, the main strength of the gameplay remains it’s huge scale, which hundreds of units fighting for control of a gigantic map, stretching over multiple square kilometers. This combined with its vast amount of units and streamlined interface and gameplay really make this a game for anyone looking for a new tactical RTS to sink their teeth into. While it offers nothing groundbreaking or genre defining, it does what it does, and it does it well, and I can wholeheartedly recommended it.


News Article | March 6, 2012
Site: www.wired.com

GENEVA — It isn’t often that a car literally makes you say WTF aloud. But it isn’t often that you see a V12-powered SUV. A Bentley SUV, no less. Pictures cannot convey the obnoxious scale of the Bentley EXP 9F concept here at the Geneva auto show, so we’ll tell you it rides on 23-inch wheels and leave it at that. It’s hard to make sense of the 9F and its unashamed bling at a time when so many automakers are stuffing small engines into small cars, or eschewing engines and petrol for motors and batteries. Naturally, the 9F comes with a 12-cylinder engine, although Bentley’s Peter Guest was quick to note a plug-in hybrid would be an option, were the behemoth to make it into production. Bentley is currently gauging reception from the few hundred people in the world who a.) would want a Bentley SUV and b.) could afford it. The 9F feels terribly wrong on all levels until you sit in on a few press conferences with luxury automakers who say the United States remains their largest market, but China isn’t far behind. Maserati, for instance, already sells half as many Maserati GranTurismos in China as they do in the states. And Bentley, which saw a banner year in 2011, enjoys particularly brisk sales in China. So from that perspective, the 9F makes a ton of sense (more like four tons, given the car’s dimensions). It’s perfect for a violently nouveaux riche market. It’s big, it’s brash and it’s completely obvious, a Continental GT on steroids. The EXP 9F — Bentley has since 1919 used the EXP designation for all experimental or concept cars, and says it “is meant to stand for ground-breaking innovation” — looks like it was carved from a block of alloy. It’s got everything you’d expect from a vehicle that will never go off-road, including all-wheel drive, along with a 6.0-liter V12. No word on when, or if, the 9F might see production, but Bentley did say many of its current customers also have an SUV in the garage, and there’s no sense giving that business to, say, Mercedes-Benz. Yes, we know this one’s got little to do with the 9F, but c’mon: they’re monogrammed velvet slippers with metal studs! This gentleman, who wore equally loud eyeglasses, was quite enjoying himself in the 9F.


News Article | September 6, 2013
Site: www.zdnet.com

Thousands of organisations seem hell-bent on sticking with Windows XP after the axe falls on official patching for the aged OS next year, so inevitably IT departments across the planet are on alert for non-Microsoft support alternatives. One company that's already thrown its hat into the ring to provide Windows XP support after Microsoft's deadline of 8 April 2014 is Arkoon, working with its north and south America distributor Matrix Global Partners. Paris-based Arkoon, which is owned by the Cassidian security arm of European defence giant EADS, is offering its ExtendedXP, or EXP, product to organisations that can't or won't make the move away from Windows XP before the end-of-life date. Matrix Global Partners CEO Bob Foley likens selling the new product, available from October for testing, to selling fallout shelters. "We're selling a solution to a problem that doesn't exist yet. But we want to let people know there may be an option that can buy them some time," he said. According to Foley, many of the organisations caught up in the issues created by the Windows XP support deadline have multi-year rollover cycles for upgrading desktops and laptops. "Unfortunately, this deadline by Microsoft is imposing a new rollover plan that doesn't match their budgets, staffing or timescales. If they know there's an option, then they may be able to readjust their budgets," he said. Another category of XP-using companies can be found, for example, in retail, but in their case they are staying resolutely with the operating system. "'We've got XP out in the stores. We're not changing. We have no intention to change. There is no advantage for us having a point-of-sale cash register running Windows 7 or Windows 8. None'. It's running a specific application. There're not in a rollover plan. They're going to keep XP," Foley said. Arkoon's product, which is based on its StormShield endpoint protection technology, consists of an 8MB security agent that sits on the XP machine. The IT department also gets a management console with a SQL database to keep track of the nodes and the agents, and access to an external monitoring service that identifies emerging vulnerabilities to the operating system, first released to manufacturers in August 2001. The monitoring service will employ a variety of resources to spot new vulnerabilities and then apply updates to the XP security template sitting on a company's server. "It will automatically update all the protected agents and continue with this ongoing protection as long as long as they want to use XP. There's the agent component and then there's the monitoring team that's supporting that," Foley said. Arkoon has always had a close relationship with Microsoft, according to Foley, but he remains unclear what bearing that will have on its attitude to information about future Windows XP vulnerabilities. "For this particular area we're not sure yet how much they're going to share with anyone. We're working on the presumption that there will be little sharing by Microsoft because they want people to move. The more information we can gather from them, great," he said. However, even in the absence of direct information from Microsoft about emerging threats and vulnerabilities, there should be clues elsewhere. "If we look at a patch Tuesday for Windows 7 in March 2014, we believe that's going also to be an indicator of a potential vulnerability in XP," Foley said. "So even if they aren't sharing information about XP vulnerabilities, we think we'll see trends that will pop up because of what they're doing in patching the later operating systems," he said. Arkoon helps the customer configure and install the software. Movement of logs from the agents up to the management console is monitored by the system, which raises alerts if certain thresholds are breached or certain events occur. "It isn't an appliance-based product. We're not going to deliver it on a PC but you can virtualise it, stick it in a virtual system, and just let it run and watch for an alert to pop up if there's a violation of some policy you've set, or watch for us to send you a template," Foley said. He envisages that EXP will be used as one element in a series of defences to protect Windows XP. "We expect all our customers using XP will have a multi-part security strategy with multiple components that will complement what we're doing. All those things combined without a patch Tuesday are still not going to protect those customers. Those things will help but ours will be the end protection, the last line of defence," he said. Organisations that opt to pilot EXP from October could be looking at its ease of use and impact on XP performance, Foley suggests. They could also use patches from previous patch Tuesdays to test the software and simulate attacks. He is optimistic that EXP will help organisations that are sticking with Windows XP but are fearful of its impact on their compliance certification. "The ultimate test will be one of our clients having an auditor come in after April 2014 and blessing EXP as a compensating control. We've met with a number of consultants in those areas and they tend to believe [EXP] will be a compensating control so we're pretty optimistic about that," Foley said. The EXP agent will cost about $15 per seat for a one year's subscription for a contract covering a few hundred PCs but discounts apply to larger volumes. The product is available in three packages: the first covers the operating system, Internet Explorer and Microsoft Office; the second is a web package covering Adobe Flash, Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome; while the third is for Adobe Reader and Java. Further custom packages can be created. "If you buy 100, it's $15 per seat. If you 50,000, it would be less. Each of the packages is around $14 and there are discounts if you combine them. If you want the two basic components it would be between $28 and $38 for a subscription," Foley said. He is keen to make it clear his organisation is not opposed to Windows 7 or Windows 8 or people moving to them. "But we've all seen the numbers. A significant number of people — is it 500 or 600 million people are going to be using XP after April 2014? It would be nice if they had an option to do so securely," Foley said.

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