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Adams D.C.,Evolution and Organismal Biology | Adams D.C.,Iowa State University
Systematic Biology | Year: 2014

Many questions in evolutionary biology require the quantification and comparison of rates of phenotypic evolution. Recently, phylogenetic comparative methods have been developed for comparing evolutionary rates on a phylogeny for single, univariate traits (σ2), and evolutionary rate matrices (R) for sets of traits treated simultaneously. However, high-dimensional traits like shape remain under-examined with this framework, because methods suited for such data have not been fully developed. In this article, I describe a method to quantify phylogenetic evolutionary rates for high-dimensional multivariate data, found from the equivalency between statistical methods based on covariance matrices and those based on distance matrices (R-mode and Q-mode methods). I then use simulations to evaluate the statistical performance of hypothesis-testing procedures that compare for two or more groups of species on a phylogeny. Under both isotropic and non-isotropic conditions, and for differing numbers of trait dimensions, the proposed method displays appropriate Type I error and high statistical power for detecting known differences in among groups. In contrast, the Type I error rate of likelihood tests based on the evolutionary rate matrix (R) increases as the number of trait dimensions (p) increases, and becomes unacceptably large when only a few trait dimensions are considered. Further, likelihood tests based on R cannot be computed when the number of trait dimensions equals or exceeds the number of taxa in the phylogeny (i.e., when p ≥ N). These results demonstrate that tests based on provide a useful means of comparing evolutionary rates for high-dimensional data that are otherwise not analytically accessible to methods based on the evolutionary rate matrix. This advance thus expands the phylogenetic comparative toolkit for high-dimensional phenotypic traits like shape. Finally, I illustrate the utility of the new approach by evaluating rates of head shape evolution in a lineage of Plethodon salamanders. © 2013 The Author(s). Source


Sproul J.S.,Oregon State University | Houston D.D.,Evolution and Organismal Biology | Nelson C.R.,Brigham Young University | Evans R.P.,Brigham Young University | And 2 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2015

Background: Phylogeographic studies of aquatic insects provide valuable insights into mechanisms that shape the genetic structure of communities, yet studies that include broad geographic areas are uncommon for this group. We conducted a broad scale phylogeographic analysis of the least salmonfly Pteronarcella badia (Plecoptera) across western North America. We tested hypotheses related to mode of dispersal and the influence of historic climate oscillations on population genetic structure. In order to generate a larger mitochondrial data set, we used 454 sequencing to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome in the early stages of the project. Results: Our analysis revealed high levels of population structure with several deeply divergent clades present across the sample area. Evidence from five mitochondrial genes and one nuclear locus identified a potentially cryptic lineage in the Pacific Northwest. Gene flow estimates and geographic clade distributions suggest that overland flight during the winged adult stage is an important dispersal mechanism for this taxon. We found evidence of multiple glacial refugia across the species distribution and signs of secondary contact within and among major clades. Conclusions: This study provides a basis for future studies of aquatic insect phylogeography at the inter-basin scale in western North America. Our findings add to an understanding of the role of historical climate isolations in shaping assemblages of aquatic insects in this region. We identified several geographic areas that may have historical importance for other aquatic organisms with similar distributions and dispersal strategies as P. badia. This work adds to the ever-growing list of studies that highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing in a phylogenetic context to improve molecular data sets from understudied groups. © 2015 Sproul et al. Source


Sproul J.S.,Oregon State University | Houston D.D.,Evolution and Organismal Biology | Nelson C.R.,Brigham Young University | Evans R.P.,Brigham Young University | And 2 more authors.
BMC Evolutionary Biology | Year: 2015

Background: Phylogeographic studies of aquatic insects provide valuable insights into mechanisms that shape the genetic structure of communities, yet studies that include broad geographic areas are uncommon for this group. We conducted a broad scale phylogeographic analysis of the least salmonfly Pteronarcella badia (Plecoptera) across western North America. We tested hypotheses related to mode of dispersal and the influence of historic climate oscillations on population genetic structure. In order to generate a larger mitochondrial data set, we used 454 sequencing to reconstruct the complete mitochondrial genome in the early stages of the project. Results: Our analysis revealed high levels of population structure with several deeply divergent clades present across the sample area. Evidence from five mitochondrial genes and one nuclear locus identified a potentially cryptic lineage in the Pacific Northwest. Gene flow estimates and geographic clade distributions suggest that overland flight during the winged adult stage is an important dispersal mechanism for this taxon. We found evidence of multiple glacial refugia across the species distribution and signs of secondary contact within and among major clades. Conclusions: This study provides a basis for future studies of aquatic insect phylogeography at the inter-basin scale in western North America. Our findings add to an understanding of the role of historical climate isolations in shaping assemblages of aquatic insects in this region. We identified several geographic areas that may have historical importance for other aquatic organisms with similar distributions and dispersal strategies as P. badia. This work adds to the ever-growing list of studies that highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing in a phylogenetic context to improve molecular data sets from understudied groups. © 2015 Sproul et al. Source


Wilsey B.J.,Evolution and Organismal Biology | Barber K.,Evolution and Organismal Biology | Martin L.M.,Evolution and Organismal Biology
New Phytologist | Year: 2015

Summary: During community assembly, early arriving exotic species might suppress other species to a greater extent than do native species. Because most exotics were intentionally introduced, we hypothesize there was human selection on regeneration traits during introduction. This could have occurred at the across- or within-species level (e.g. during cultivar development). We tested these predictions by seeding a single species that was either native, exotic 'wild-type' (from their native range), or exotic 'cultivated' using 28 grassland species in a glasshouse experiment. Priority effects were assessed by measuring species' effect on establishment of species from a seed mix added 21 d later. Exotic species had higher germination and earlier emergence dates than native species, and differences were found in both 'wild' and 'cultivated' exotics. Exotic species reduced biomass and species diversity of later arriving species much more than native species, regardless of seed source. Results indicate that in situations in which priority effects are likely to be strong, effects will be greater when an exotic species arrives first than when a native species arrives first; and this difference is not merely a result of exotic species cultivation, but might be a general native-exotic difference that deserves further study. © 2014 New Phytologist Trust. Source

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