Boca Raton, FL, United States
Boca Raton, FL, United States

Everglades University is a small private college located in Boca Raton, Florida, United States. The university is regionally accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's and master's degrees.It was originally called the American Flyers College when it was established in 1990. In 1998 it was purchased by the owners of Keiser University who changed it to a non-profit school purchasing administrative services from the for-profit Keiser.In 2011 Everglades College Inc., which owns Everglades University bought Keiser University which was then turned into a non-profit school. Wikipedia.

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News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best schools with online programs in the state of Florida for 2017. A total of 45 schools received honors for their online education offerings, with University of Florida, University of Miami, Florida State University, University of South Florida-Main Campus, Jacksonville University, Tallahassee Community College and Florida Keys Community College earning top spots overall. More than a dozen unique data points were evaluated to determine each school’s score. “The schools on our Best Online Schools list for Florida all meet high standards of excellence for students who want to succeed outside of a brick-and-mortar classroom,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. Colleges and universities on the Best Online Schools list must meet specific base requirements to be included. Qualifications include being institutionally accredited and holding public or private not-for-profit status. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria that includes the student/teacher ratio, graduation rate, employment services and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Florida’s Best Online Schools for 2017 include the following: Adventist University of Health Sciences Ave Maria University Barry University Bethune-Cookman University Broward College City College-Fort Lauderdale Daytona State College Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University-Worldwide Everglades University Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University Florida Atlantic University Florida Gulf Coast University Florida Institute of Technology Florida International University Florida Keys Community College Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Florida State University Hobe Sound Bible College Hodges University Indian River State College Jacksonville University Johnson & Wales University-North Miami Keiser University-Ft. Lauderdale Lynn University Nova Southeastern University Palm Beach Atlantic University Saint Leo University South Florida Bible College and Theological Seminary Southeastern University St. Petersburg College St. Thomas University State College of Florida-Manatee-Sarasota Stetson University Tallahassee Community College The Baptist College of Florida The University of West Florida Trinity College of Florida University of Central Florida University of Florida University of Miami University of North Florida University of South Florida-Main Campus Warner University Webber International University ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A list of the Best Online Colleges in Florida for 2016 has been released by leading higher education information resource AffordableCollegesOnline.org. Analyzing more than a dozen unique data points, 40 schools were pinpointed for offering maximum value and quality in online learning in the state. Four-year colleges earning the highest marks include Saint Leo University, University of Florida, Florida International University, Keiser University Fort Lauderdale and the University of Central Florida; two-year colleges include Tallahassee Community College, Locklin Technical Center and Sheridan Technical College. "More than 60 percent of college students in Florida are going to school part-time, and online education programs allow these students the flexibility to take on the challenge of earning a degree,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "The colleges on our list are maximizing student’s time and efforts by providing a variety of degree programs online, while maintaining a focus on affordability.” In order to be considered for ranking, AffordableCollegesOnline.org requires colleges and universities to meet several baseline requirements. The Best Online Colleges in Florida are all fully accredited and carry public or private not-for-profit status. Schools on the Best Two-Year list all offer in-state tuition under $5,000 per year, while schools on the Best Four-Year list offer in-state tuition under $25,000 per year. Rankings for each college are determined by a variety of other qualitative and quantitative metrics, including student-teacher ratios and graduation rates. A full list of the Best Online Colleges in Florida, including rankings and information on how each school was scored can be found by visit the following page: The full list of Best Two-Year Online Colleges in Florida for 2016 is included below: The full list of Best Two-Year Online Colleges in Florida for 2016 is included below: Adventist University of Health Sciences Bethune-Cookman University Broward College City College - Fort Lauderdale Daytona State College Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide Everglades University Florida Atlantic University Florida Gateway College Florida Gulf Coast University Florida International University Florida SouthWestern State College Florida State College at Jacksonville Hobe Sound Bible College Hodges University Indian River State College Johnson University Florida Keiser University - Fort Lauderdale Pensacola State College Remington College - Heathrow Campus Saint Leo University South Florida Bible College and Theological Seminary Southeastern University St. Petersburg College State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota The Baptist College of Florida The University of West Florida Trinity College of Florida University of Central Florida University of Florida University of Fort Lauderdale University of North Florida Warner University Webber International University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


PubMed | University of Florida and Everglades University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Environmental entomology | Year: 2016

The melonworm, Diaphania hyalinata L. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), is one of the most serious insect problems affecting cucurbit production. We evaluated the relative preference and suitability of yellow squash, zucchini, cucumber, and watermelon to melonworm by measuring its oviposition, larval feeding preference, survivorship, and developmental responses in the laboratory. Whole plants were used for oviposition study, whereas host leaf discs were used for all the other studies. Watermelon feeding resulted in the longest larval development period (14.3d), greatest prepupal weights and survivals rates (92%; first instar to adult) among the four crops. However, for watermelon, adult oviposition preference (199.5eggs/), egg survival (70%), and larval feeding (4.1% defoliation) were numerically or statistically lowest, and larval head capsule widths and whole-body lengths were smallest. When differences occurred among these variables, yellow squash, zucchini, and cucumber were each typically higher (or quicker to develop) than watermelon. So why do melonworm adults not prefer watermelon, or at least select it as frequently as squash and cucumber when ovipositing? The answer likely is that there might be some variation in the important chemical components among these cucurbits. We suggest that comparison of kairomones and allomones from watermelon and related cucurbits would be very useful for determining the combination resulting in the lowest risk of damage to the more susceptible cucurbits (assuming the levels can be modified without seriously affecting the crops).


PubMed | University of Florida and Everglades University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of economic entomology | Year: 2016

Organic zucchini squash is a high-value vegetable crop in Florida and potential exists to expand its production throughout the state. A lack of knowledge on the effectiveness of organic products and their integration with natural enemies is an important constraint to the regulation of pest populations in organic squash production in Florida. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of insecticides labeled for organic production that can be used for management of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B, on organically grown squash; and to determine the effects of the most efficient insecticides on a key natural enemy, Delphastus catalinae (Horn). Experiments were conducted in the greenhouse in exclusion cages. The first experiment compared the effects of four bioinsecticides on whitefly densities. Insecticides include 1) AzaSol (azadirachtin), 2) PyGanic EC 1.4 (pyrethrin), 3) M-Pede (insecticidal soap), and 4) Entrust (spinosad). The second experiment investigated the effects of bioinsecticides on D. catalinae Treatment effectiveness was evaluated 1, 3, and 5d posttreatment. PyGanic and M-Pede were highly effective in controlling whitefly populations on organic squash, while moderate control was provided by AzaSol and there was no control provided by Entrust. PyGanic and M-Pede treatments reduced D. catalinae populations when adults were released 1d post pesticide application. However, when adults were released 5d post application, there was no reduction. The importance of using bioinsecticides in combination with natural enemies to regulate pest populations in organic cropping systems is discussed.


PubMed | University of Florida, Everglades University and University of Florida Tropical Research and Education Center
Type: | Journal: Journal of economic entomology | Year: 2016

Florida sweet corn is intensively treated to prevent infestation from the corn-infesting picture-winged fly complex (hereafter referred to as silk flies, Diptera: Ulidiidae). Previous bioassays performed onEuxesta stigmatiasLoew demonstrated some pyrethroids performed weakly, while others were more efficacious and with longer-lasting residual activity. Since the last published bioassays, new active ingredients have been made available, other species in the complex discovered, and label restrictions increased for some products. For these reasons, topical bioassays were performed on the three most common species to assess insecticide efficacy of current commercial products labeled for either silk fly or fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda(J.E. Smith), Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) control. Bioassays were conducted using formulated product mixed in water and applied using a Generation III Research Spray Booth. The median lethal concentration ratio (LC


PubMed | University of Florida, EMBRAPA - Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Everglades University and Washington State University
Type: | Journal: Journal of economic entomology | Year: 2016

The development of simple and reliable pest sampling programs is needed for growers to adopt economic or aesthetic injury levels. We developed a sampling plan for monitoring chilli thrips Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood populations on KnockOut shrub roses under simulated nursery conditions. The distribution of S. dorsalis among different plant structures revealed that most adults and larvae are found on foliar terminals, when compared with buds and flowers. Based on thrips distribution, the third leaf of actively growing terminals was used to determine a sequential sampling model. Thrips had an aggregated distribution, based on Taylors power law and Iwaos mean crowding index, with both models showing a good fit (i.e., R


Larsen N.A.,Everglades University | Nuessly G.S.,Everglades University | Cherry R.H.,Everglades University | Glaz B.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Journal of Pest Science | Year: 2013

Wireworms (larval Elateridae) reduce the stand of newly planted sugarcane (complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) directly by damaging growing points and indirectly by facilitating disease introduction. No research has evaluated resistance or tolerance of sugarcane genotypes grown in Florida to wireworm. Eleven genotypes of sugarcane and a S. spontaneum genotype were subjected to corn wireworm, Melanotus communis (Gyllenhall) (Coleoptera: Elateridae), in greenhouse experiments to evaluate potential host plant resistance. The experiments were designed to measure the effects of wireworms on the first 90 days of growth. Sugarcane stalk sections were planted in trays of soil with and without wireworms in 2010 and 2011. Stand count, dry weight, and percentage of nodes damaged were evaluated. Wireworms reduced stand and dry weight by 40-60 %. Several genotypes were able to produce acceptable stands in wireworm-infested trays by emerging quickly and producing many tillers. CP 88-1762, CP 89-2143, and CP 03-1912 did not suffer statistically significant losses of stand or biomass due to wireworms in either year. Our findings suggest that genotype resistance should be considered as an important component of an integrated program aimed at reducing the use of insecticides to control wireworms in sugarcane. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Odero D.C.,Everglades University
Weed Technology | Year: 2012

Field and greenhouse studies were conducted in Belle Glade, FL, in 2010 and 2011 to evaluate saflufenacil and glyphosate efficacy on POST burndown of ragweed parthenium. Log-logistic models were used to determine the herbicide dose required to produce 90 control (ED90). The ED90 for rosette ragweed parthenium control in the greenhouse was saflufenacil at 8.0 g ai ha -1 at 14 d after treatment. The rate required to cause 90 growth reduction of rosette ragweed parthenium at 14 d after treatment was 8.9 g ha -1 of saflufenacil. The probability of rosette ragweed parthenium survival decreased with increasing rates of saflufenacil. The ED90 value for bolted ragweed parthenium control in the field was 5.7 g ha -1 of saflufenacil at 21 d after treatment. Ragweed parthenium had no response to glyphosate either in the field or in the greenhouse studies. This demonstrates that saflufenacil can be used as a POST burndown of ragweed parthenium populations that have no response to glyphosate. Nomenclature: Glyphosate; saflufenacil; ragweed parthenium, Parthenium hysterophorus L.


Palomera-Arias R.,University of Texas at San Antonio | Capano C.D.,Everglades University
ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2014

The Associated General Contractors of America's Education and Research Foundation (AGCERF) launched a professional paid internship initiative for construction faculty starting on the summer of 2013. Prior to the official program launching, a pilot program was tested in the summer of 2011, with an AGC member contractor hosting a single faculty member selected from an ACCE accredited institution. The internship was designed as a three-way partnership between the AGC-ERF, the faculty host institution, and the host company. The initial budget of the program was $30,000 funded in equal parts by the three internship partners. The internship was for a period of two months, and the faculty was a member of the jobsite management team at a level similar to a project engineer or assistant project manager. This paper presents the model followed for the implementation of the internship, as well as evaluates the results of the pilot program from the perspective of the academic side of the partnership. The internship was an excellent opportunity to develop closer ties between academia, the construction companies, and AGC; by promoting the free exchange of information, knowledge, and ideas that benefits the construction industry as a whole. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2014.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

Everglades University welcomes a health and wellness entrepreneur to serve in its advisory board

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