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Kurta R.P.,German Electron Synchrotron | Altarelli M.,European X Ray Free Electronic Laser Facility | Vartanyants I.A.,German Electron Synchrotron | Vartanyants I.A.,National Research Nuclear University MEPhI
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics | Year: 2013

Angular X-ray cross-correlation analysis (XCCA) is an approach to study the structure of disordered systems using the results of X-ray scattering experiments. In this paper we summarize recent theoretical developments related to the Fourier analysis of the cross-correlation functions. Results of our simulations demonstrate the application of XCCA to two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) disordered ensembles of particles. We show that the structure of a single particle can be recovered using X-ray data collected from a 2D disordered system of identical particles. We also demonstrate that valuable structural information about the local structure of 3D systems, inaccessible from a standard small-angle X-ray scattering experiment, can be resolved using XCCA. © 2013 R. P. Kurta et al. Source


Kurta R.P.,German Electron Synchrotron | Dronyak R.,German Electron Synchrotron | Altarelli M.,European X Ray Free Electronic Laser Facility | Weckert E.,German Electron Synchrotron | And 2 more authors.
New Journal of Physics | Year: 2013

While the implementation of single-particle coherent diffraction imaging for non-crystalline particles is complicated by current limitations on photon flux, hit rate and sample delivery, the concept of many-particle coherent diffraction imaging offers an alternative way of overcoming these difficulties. In this paper, we present a direct, non-iterative approach for the recovery of the diffraction pattern corresponding to a single particle using coherent x-ray data collected from a two-dimensional disordered system of identical particles; this approach does not require a priori information about the particles and can be applied to the general case of particles without symmetry. The reconstructed single-particle diffraction pattern can be directly used in common iterative phase retrieval algorithms to recover the structure of the particle. © IOP Publishing and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. Source


Angelini R.,CNR Institute for Chemical and Physical Processes | Angelini R.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Madsen A.,European X Ray Free Electronic Laser Facility | Fluerasu A.,Brookhaven National Laboratory | And 4 more authors.
Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects | Year: 2014

The localization length rloc associated with a fast secondary relaxation in glassy Laponite is determined by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) through a Debye-Waller fit of the non-ergodicity parameter. Quantitative differences are observed between the time dependence (aging) of rloc in spontaneously aged and rejuvenated samples. This behavior is also reflected in the calculated shear modulus which matches well with data obtained by rheological measurements. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Source


Altarelli M.,European X Ray Free Electronic Laser Facility
Crystallography Reports | Year: 2010

Activities on free-electron laser (FEL) x-ray sources, based on linear accelerators, to produce spatially coherent, ultra-short (∼100 fs) pulses with very high peak brilliance (10 28-10 32 photons/s/mm 2/mrad 2/0.1% BW) are summarized. The scientific case includes time-resolved studies of dynamics on sub-ps scales, structural studies by imaging of non-periodic systems, and investigation of high energy-density phenomena such as non-linear x-ray optics and the production of warm dense matter. Examples are presented, with emphasis on the operational facilities, FLASH at DESY, Hamburg and LCLS in Stanford, California, and on the European XFEL project in Hamburg. © 2010 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. Source


Altarelli M.,European X Ray Free Electronic Laser Facility
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms | Year: 2011

Activities on free-electron laser (FEL) X-ray sources, based on linear accelerators, to produce spatially coherent, ultra-short (∼100 fs) pulses with very high peak brilliance (1028-1032 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1% BW) are summarized, with special emphasis on the European XFEL project in Hamburg. The scientific case includes time-resolved studies of dynamics on sub-ps scales, structural studies by imaging of non-periodic systems, and investigation of high energy-density phenomena such as non-linear X-ray optics and the production of warm dense matter. Examples are presented, with reference to the experience gained on the presently operational facilities, FLASH at DESY, Hamburg and LCLS in Stanford, California. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source

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