Aarau, Switzerland
Aarau, Switzerland

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-9-2014 | Award Amount: 1.04M | Year: 2015

Through a comprehensive perspective that includes the most relevant social and political connections, the project aims to address the proposed topic from a double standpoint, namely, an analytical as well as a public policy perspective. We start from the idea that since the second half of the last century culture has experienced a profound mutation, through which its position and role in the social dynamics have been transformed. Whereas it was previously confined to a purely superstructural position, it now constitutes an essential basis of todays society. In the context of cultural digitization and globalization the entire cultural ecosystem has changed, which has radically altered - and at the same time, intensified - the relationship between cultural identity, cultural heritage and cultural expression. This transformation has occurred both at the level of the professional cultural sector as well as in society as a whole. The new challenges and the new potential of culture, where these three pillars - cultural identity, cultural heritage and cultural expression - intertwine, will be considered in the work of the platform along three axes: 1. Cultural memory 2. Cultural inclusion 3. Cultural creativity These are designed to research debates relating to heritage in the institutions and practices of cultural memory; how the focus on diversity and inclusion impacts on the practices of memory institutions, including on stakeholders and networks; what this reconfiguration contributes to new or post-national oriented narratives about identity and European values; and how heritage, cultural diversity and creativity relate in the context of huge cultural transformations such as the ones represented by digitization and cultural globalization.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-05-2015 | Award Amount: 51.69M | Year: 2016

In order to unlock the full potential of Europes offshore resources, network infrastructure is urgently required, linking off-shore wind parks and on-shore grids in different countries. HVDC technology is envisaged but the deployment of meshed HVDC offshore grids is currently hindered by the high cost of converter technology, lack of experience with protection systems and fault clearance components and immature international regulations and financial instruments. PROMOTioN will overcome these barriers by development and demonstration of three key technologies, a regulatory and financial framework and an offshore grid deployment plan for 2020 and beyond. A first key technology is presented by Diode Rectifier offshore converter. This concept is ground breaking as it challenges the need for complex, bulky and expensive converters, reducing significantly investment and maintenance cost and increasing availability. A fully rated compact diode rectifier converter will be connected to an existing wind farm. The second key technology is an HVDC grid protection system which will be developed and demonstrated utilising multi-vendor methods within the full scale Multi-Terminal Test Environment. The multi-vendor approach will allow DC grid protection to become a plug-and-play solution. The third technology pathway will first time demonstrate performance of existing HVDC circuit breaker prototypes to provide confidence and demonstrate technology readiness of this crucial network component. The additional pathway will develop the international regulatory and financial framework, essential for funding, deployment and operation of meshed offshore HVDC grids. With 35 partners PROMOTioN is ambitious in its scope and advances crucial HVDC grid technologies from medium to high TRL. Consortium includes all major HVDC and wind turbine manufacturers, TSOs linked to the North Sea, offshore wind developers, leading academia and consulting companies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-1-2014 | Award Amount: 2.50M | Year: 2015

In response to the European debt crisis and associated deep recession, a number of important steps have recently been taken towards redesigning the institutional architecture of EMU, based on the roadmap outlined in the Van Rompuy Report (2012). But these institutional innovations in particular the fiscal compact, the ESM, the SSM and the SRM retain relatively weak theoretical foundations. In particular, there is a noticeable gap between policy-oriented analyses of the precise EU challenges, and the major developments in dynamic macroeconomic theory of the past three decades. ADEMU brings together eight research groups from leading European institutions with the aim of closing this gap. It studies the overall monetary and fiscal structure of the EU and the euro area, and the mechanisms of fiscal policy coordination among member states, with specific focus on: i) ensuring the long-term sustainability of EMU, addressing issues such as debt overhang, fiscal consolidation, public debt management, risk-sharing within the union, and crisis management mechanisms; ii) building resilience to economic shocks, with special emphasis on the coordination of fiscal policies, fiscal multipliers and labor market risks; and iii) managing interdependence in the euro area, analyzing both fiscal and financial spillovers and the effects of macroeconomic imbalances on financial and money markets, and, to confront these issues, new forms of banking regulation and monetary policy. ADEMU is at the frontier of dynamic macroeconomic research, and the project will generate new knowledge that will be used to provide a rigorous assessment of the current institutional framework, and detailed proposals for improving it. It will also be a focal point in debates among academics, policymakers and other stakeholders regarding the implementation of new policies. The scope of the project will include a full consideration of political economy and legal dimensions to alternative institutional reforms


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2014-EF | Award Amount: 172.48K | Year: 2016

This project analyses the construction of collective identity and territorial belonging by examining selected monuments in the historical region of the northern Adriatic that today is shared by Italy, Slovenia and Croatia. The links between historical memory and modern forms of identification are most complex and unstable in ethnically mixed regions with a long record of political and symbolic border shifts. Building on my previous archival research on the history of the region, I aim to develop a more complex understanding of the links among identification, belonging, nationality and the symbols used to invoke all of them. This project will apply the tools of various disciplines, including history and anthropology in order to understand how cultures of remembrance and politics of memory form, intertwine and overlap in transnational areas. In this new project, I am adopting a genuinely comparative and transnational perspective and I must test new methodological arguments by applying the methods of emerging border studies. The intertwining of these two methodologies is still underdeveloped in historical research. I will analyse the memory landscapes of three port-cities from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present: Trieste/Trst (Italy), Koper/Capodistria (Slovenia), and Rijeka/Fiume (Croatia). The project is divided in five work-packages: Management (WP 1), Dissemination (WP 2), Imperial Sites of Memory (WP 3), World War I Sites of Memory (WP 4) and World War II Sites of Memory (WP 5). With this project I will make an original contribution to the modern cultural and social history of Europe that should be of interest to scholars, decision makers, cultural managers, teachers and to European society in general. My stay at the EUI will not only increase my historical expertise, teaching experience, networking opportunities, research and language skills, but will also have long-term effects on my integration in the international scientific community.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-06-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 6.35M | Year: 2016

The Paris Agreement substantially increased the need for countries and regions to understand the full economic, social and environmental implications of the deep decarbonisation to which the global community is now committed. The EU has long had decarbonisation ambitions, but there remains considerable uncertainty as to precisely how these ambitions will be achieved, or what the impacts of such achievement will be on the EU economy and society more generally. INNOPATHS will resolve this uncertainty to the extent possible, will characterise and provide a quantification of the uncertainty which remains, and will describe in great detail a number of possible low-carbon pathways for the EU, together with the economic, social and environmental impacts to which they are likely to lead. These pathways will be co-designed with the aid of 23 stakeholders from different sectors who have already provided letters of support to INNOPATHS. INNOPATHS will suggest through this analysis how the benefits of these pathways, such as new industries, jobs and competitiveness, may be maximized, and how any negative impacts, such as those on low-income households, or on carbon-intensive sectors, may be mitigated. INNOPATHS will communicate its insights through the normal scientific channels, and make substantial contributions to the scientific literature, but will go well beyond this in terms of interactions with stakeholders, building on the co-design processes in the project to reach out to stakeholder networks of businesses, NGOs, local and national policy makers. INNOPATHS will create four innovative online tools to explain its pathways, technological transitions and policies, to different constituencies. Through these tools and other dissemination and communication mechanisms, INNOPATHS will have a substantial impact on the climate and energy policy debates up to and beyond 2020, increasing the probability that decisions in this area will be taken in an informed and cost-effective way


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INT-07-2015 | Award Amount: 2.40M | Year: 2016

The Middle East and North Africa Regional Architecture: mapping geopolitical shifts, regional order and domestic transformations -the MENARA Project- will study the geopolitical order in the making in the South and East Mediterranean Countries and the Middle East amid all deep-reaching social and political changes unfolding since 2010. The project aims at describing the main features of the regional geopolitical order, its origins, and evolution; identifying and mapping the decisive domestic, regional and global actors, dynamics and trends; building future scenarios for 2025 and 2040; and informing EU policies and strategies. It will examine whether, where and when conflict and/or cohesion dynamics prevail, the level and depth of regional fragmentation and the effects of regional and domestic processes on global dynamics and vice versa. This will be achieved by analysing ideational and material factors (national, sub and supra-national identities; religion and politics; global identities; demography; energy; economy; military; environment) and by conducting in-depth research on specific case studies on ongoing dynamics at three different levels (domestic, regional and global). All this research will be based on quantitative and qualitative methods -including fact finding missions on the ground, interviews, focus groups, Delphi surveys - and innovative foresight techniques. Research will be accompanied by pioneering dissemination methods willing to increase the projects impact not only over the specific academic community and policy-making circles but also over broader general public. This will include the translation of research results into accessible deliverables such as audio-visuals, futures notes series, infographics and interactive maps, and a Massive Open Online Course.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 86.24K | Year: 2017

This research project will explore the Greek debt and austerity crisis to consider what it discloses about the influence of European political economy on the principles and practices of legal rights, and with what implications. The term legal rights in this work includes human rights as well as the international rights of states and these respective approaches underpin the two component parts of this study. This is a multidisciplinary study that assumes the validity of law as a means of advancing the cause of justice, but recognises that it is shaped in important ways by other dominant narratives. This study is an exploration of that clash of narratives and its effects on justice in Europe. The first part of this research project is animated by the idea of social rights as fiscal risks, an idea that finds expression in the latest Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) of August 2015 between the international creditors and Greece. In exploring the means through which human rights safeguards are being made to disappear under fiscal targets, a case study on the influence of austerity reasoning on what constitutes the public interest as a human rights concept will form part of the first section of the project. The second part of this research project will explore the legality of the bailout agreement when measured against the principle of economic self-determination. A preliminary review of the same MoU would seem to offend any reasonable form of economic self-determination, a principle with a long pedigree in international law and demands by states of sovereignty over their economic affairs. Taken together, the two studies will expose ways in which rights are being shaped by the intellectual justifications, logic and practice of economic and financial policy as played out under the European crisis of debt and austerity.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-STG | Phase: ERC-StG-2014 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2015

EU Border Care is a comparative study of the politics of maternity care among undocumented migrants on the EUs peripheries. Empirical analysis of personal and institutional relations of care and control in the context of pregnancy and childbirth will support an innovative critique of the moral rationale underpinning healthcare delivery and migration governance in some of Europes most densely crossed borderlands in France, Greece, Italy and Spain. Unlike other categories of migrants, undocumented pregnant women are a growing phenomenon, yet few social science or public health studies address EU migrant maternity care. This subject has urgent implications: whilst recent geopolitical events in North Africa and the Middle East have triggered a quantifiable increase in pregnant women entering the EU in an irregular situation, poor maternal health indicators among such women represent ethical and medical challenges to which frontline maternity services located in EU borderlands have to respond, often with little preparation or support from national and European central authorities. Grounded in long-term ethnographic fieldwork in maternity wards located in French Guiana and Mayotte (Overseas France), the North Aegean and Attica (Greece), Sicily (Italy), and Ceuta and Melilla (Spain), my project will trace the networks of maternity care delivery in peripheries facing an increase of immigration flows, and characterised by structural social and economic underinvestment. My team will investigate migrant maternity from three interlinked research perspectives: migrant women, healthcare delivery staff, and regional institutional agencies. Empirical and desk research, combined with creative audio-visual methods, will document migrant maternity on EU borderlands to address wider questions about identity and belonging, citizenship and sovereignty, and humanitarianism and universalism in Europe today.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2014 | Award Amount: 1.81M | Year: 2015

The project investigates the European Socialist regimes expectations and predicaments vis--vis the opening of a space of pan-European cooperation in the long 1970s. Against the background of East-West dtente and incipient globalization, the Socialist lites had to work out complex ideological, economic, and political issues originating from their attempts at integrating in the world economy, deepening their rapprochement with Western Europe and dealing with the commercial giant next door, the EC. We intend to provide the first historical appraisal of the late Socialist lites views of their countries place and prospects in an emerging space of trans-European connections that presented them with new patterns of exchange and potential regional integration while challenging existing configurations of stability, political control and ideological self-legitimization. The project intertwines international and economic history approaches to provide a dynamic portrait of the Socialist lites paradigms, goals and constraints in envisioning interdependence with Western Europe and cooperation with the EC. In order to map the debate within each European socialist country, our focus will be not only on the ruling party but also on state bureaucracy, experts and academics, trade unions, managers, and the official press. Our research will thus rely on a variety of primary sources originated by these actors. Our study aims at linking the usually separate scholarships on Eastern and Western Europe and broadening the scope of integration historiography beyond the EC experience, bringing the outsiders perspective in. It will shed new light on the long-term paths of European integration and the antecedents to EU enlargement to Eastern Europe. The PI will lead a team of experts on Socialist countries and historians of Western Europes integration, whose close collaboration is the key to the conceptual development of a broader history of European co-operation.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-06-2015 | Award Amount: 12.66M | Year: 2016

The project SmartNet aims at providing architectures for optimized interaction between TSOs and DSOs in managing the exchange of information for monitoring and for the acquisition of ancillary services (reserve and balancing, voltage regulation, congestion management) both at national level and in a cross-border context. Local needs for ancillary services in distribution systems are supposed to co-exist with system needs for balancing and congestion management. Resources located in distribution systems, like demand side management and distributed generation, are supposed to participate to the provision of ancillary services both locally and for the system in the context of competitive ancillary services markets. Through an in-depth and a simulation in a lab-environment, answers are sought for to the following questions: which ancillary services could be provided from distribution to the whole system (via transmission), which optimized modalities could be adopted for managing the network at the TSO-DSO interface and what monitoring and control signals could be exchanged to carry out a coordinated action, how the architectures of the real time markets (in particular the balancing markets) could be consequently revised, what information has to be exchanged and how (ICT) for the coordination on the distribution-transmission border, starting from monitoring aspects, to guarantee observability and control of distributed generation, flexible demand and storage systems, which implications could the above issues have on the on-going market coupling process, that is going to be extended to real time markets in the next years, according to the draft Network Code on Electricity Balancing by ENTSO-E. Different TSO-DSO interaction modalities are compared with reference to three selected national cases (Italian, Danish, Spanish) also supposing the possibility of a cross-border exchange of balancing services. Physical pilots are developed for the same national cases.

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