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Verhoeven P.,European Sea Ports Organisation ESPO
Maritime Policy and Management | Year: 2010

The ever-changing environment in which ports operate has put strong pressure on the traditional role of public port authorities. Market developments have created the need for ports to be part of wider logistics networks and to provide value-added services. Powerful private players who are organised on a global scale, such as carriers, terminal operators and logistics service providers, struggle to gain control over port-oriented logistics networks whereas port authorities very often seem to remain local spectators with limited influence on these market-driven processes. Port authorities are on the other hand, the focal point of criticism from societal interests such as local government, NGOs and citizens for negative externalities related to port development and port operations even if these do not always fall within their direct responsibility. In 1990, Richard Goss questioned, albeit rather rhetorically, the need to have public sector port authorities. Since then scholars have demonstrated a true renaissance or renewed interest in the role of port authorities, recommending repositioning and development of new strategies. Parallel to the concept of the 'renaissance man', which is defined as a person who is well educated and excels in a wide variety of subjects or fields, a kind of 'renaissance port authority' is emerging from literature which may take on a variety of facilitating and even entrepreneurial tasks. The purpose of this article is to develop a conceptual framework for the various options at hand, based on an extensive literature review of port authority functions. The framework also identifies the principal governance-related factors that may in practice enable or prevent port authorities, particularly in Europe, from assuming the renaissance ambitions advocated by scholars. The hypotheses developed in this article form the basis of a wider empirical research agenda into reform of port governance in Europe and elsewhere in the world. © 2010 Taylor & Francis. Source


Notteboom T.,University of Antwerp | Verhoeven P.,European Sea Ports Organisation ESPO
European Transport - Trasporti Europei | Year: 2010

The awarding of port services to private operators has become one of the most important tools for port authorities to retain some control on the organization and structure of the supply side of the terminal market. This paper discusses the awarding of terminals in European ports from an EU legal and policy context. It also seeks to provide in-depth information on current practices and perceptions of port authorities around Europe on tendering and contractual arrangements linked to the awarding of erminals. The relevant issues relate to the terminal awarding processes, the duration of the terminal award contract and the contract stipulations. The paper also seeks to understand whether the practices are influenced by factors such as terminal size, the competitive environment in which the port operates and the geographical location. Source


Puig M.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | Wooldridge C.,University of Cardiff | Michail A.,European Sea Ports Organisation ESPO | Darbra R.M.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia
Environmental Science and Policy | Year: 2015

This paper investigates the current status and trends over time in the environmental performance of European ports. The research is based on the provision of data from 79 European ports on issues related to their environmental management, environmental priorities and current environmental monitoring practices. This study updates previous environmental reviews, so that the trends over time are drawn. For instance, 90% of respondent ports stated that they have an environmental policy and 94% of ports have designated environmental personnel. The percentage of ports that have an Environmental Management System has increased by +33% in the last 9 years. Air quality, port waste and energy consumption emerged as the three major environmental priorities of the European port sector in 2013. The research also reveals the diversity amongst European ports in terms of size and physical surroundings. Some examples are presented on specific initiatives carried out by sector organisations about the Top-10 port priority issues. The future expectations of European ports on data collection and reporting are described. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Antao P.,Glintt Inov Global Intelligent Technologies | Calderon M.,Southampton Solent University | Puig M.,Polytechnic University of Catalonia | Michail A.,European Sea Ports Organisation ESPO | And 2 more authors.
Safety Science | Year: 2016

This paper aims at defining a set of indicators to be applied in port areas on the topics of Occupational Health, Safety, Security (OHSS) and Environment. The techniques used to identify and select the OHSS indicators involved two different approaches: (i) a bottom-up method, where an extended and in-depth analysis was performed in order to assess the current indicators applied by ports and, (ii) a top-down approach, mainly based on legislation and regulations as well as the feedback from stakeholders of the port and shipping industry. The bottom-up approach analysed a total number of 526 ports, allowing the identification of the most frequent indicators used by them. The top-down approach collected valuable opinions and suggestions from the port community members. A consensus between the results obtained in the two approaches was reached in order to provide ports with the most adequate and implementable indicators. The Environmental Performance Indicators (EPIs) have been selected based on the results of previous research projects plus further discussions with port stakeholders. The information provided in this paper can be considered as a preliminary attempt to promote port performance measurement in these four sensitive fields. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Notteboom T.,University of Antwerp | Verhoeven P.,European Sea Ports Organisation ESPO | Fontanet M.,European Sea Ports Organisation ESPO
Maritime Policy and Management | Year: 2012

The awarding of port services to private operators has become one of the most important tools for port authorities to retain some control on the organization and structure of the supply side of the terminal market. This paper discusses the awarding of terminals in European ports. The first part provides information on current practices of port authorities around Europe on tendering and contractual arrangements linked to the awarding of terminals. This includes the terminal awarding processes, the duration of the terminal award contract and the contract stipulations. The discussion is based on the results of an extensive survey among European ports conducted in spring 2008 and the European Sea Ports Organisation (ESPO) Fact Finding Report published in 2011. In a second part, the awarding of port terminals is placed in the European Union (EU) legal and policy context. The paper concludes with an extensive discussion on the desirability, feasibility and possible content of a good practice guide for European ports on the awarding of terminals. Such a guide is currently being developed by ESPO and intends to serve as a substantial contribution of port authorities to the soft law approach in EU port policy development. © 2012 Taylor & Francis. Source

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