European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI

Châteauneuf-Grasse, France

European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI

Châteauneuf-Grasse, France

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Tascone O.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Tascone O.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | Fillatre Y.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Roy C.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Meierhenrich U.J.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2015

This study investigates the concentrations of 54 multiclass pesticides during the transformation processes from rose petal to concrete and absolute using roses spiked with pesticides as a model. The concentrations of the pesticides were followed during the process of transforming the spiked rose flowers from an organic field into concrete and then into absolute. The rose flowers, the concrete, and the absolute, as well as their transformation intermediates, were analyzed for pesticide content using gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. We observed that all the pesticides were extracted and concentrated in the absolute, with the exception of three molecules: fenthion, fenamiphos, and phorate. Typical pesticides were found to be concentrated by a factor of 100-300 from the rose flowers to the rose absolute. The observed effect of pesticide enrichment was also studied in roses and their extracts from four classically phytosanitary treated fields. Seventeen pesticides were detected in at least one of the extracts. Like the case for the spiked samples in our model, the pesticides present in the rose flowers from Turkey were concentrated in the absolute. Two pesticides, methidathion and chlorpyrifos, were quantified in the rose flowers at approximately 0.01 and 0.01-0.05 mg kg-1, respectively, depending on the treated field. The concentrations determined for the corresponding rose absolutes were 4.7 mg kg-1 for methidathion and 0.65-27.25 mg kg-1 for chlorpyrifos. © 2015 American Chemical Society.


Tascone O.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Tascone O.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | Roy C.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Filippi J.-J.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | Meierhenrich U.J.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2014

Natural extracts used by the fragrance and cosmetics industries, namely essential oils, concretes, resinoids, and absolutes, are produced from natural raw materials. These are often cultivated by use of monoculture techniques that involve the use of different classes of xenobiotica, including pesticides. Because of these pesticides' potential effect on public health and the environment, laws regarding permitted residual levels of pesticides used in cultivation of raw materials for fragrance and cosmetic products are expected to become stricter. The purpose of this review is to present and classify pesticides commonly used in the cultivation of these natural raw materials. We will summarize the most recent regulations, and discuss publications on detection of pesticides via chemical analysis of raw natural extracts. Advances in analytical chemistry for identification and quantification of pesticides will be presented, including both sample preparation and modern separation and detection techniques, and examples of the identification and quantification of individual pesticides present in natural extracts, for example essential oils, will be provided. [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Tascone O.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Tascone O.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | Shirshikova M.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Roy C.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Meierhenrich U.J.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2014

Damascena and centifolia roses are cultivated worldwide for their petal extracts that contain key odorant ingredients of perfumes. The analytical identification and quantification of pesticides in rose petals have never been described in the literature. Here, we report on a newly developed method using dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) cleanup followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of multi-residue pesticides in rose petals. Analytes were extracted from the matrix using acetonitrile and a mixture of salts containing magnesium sulfate, sodium citrate, sodium chloride, and sodium sesquihydrate. Samples were cleaned up twice by d-SPE applying primary and secondary amines (PSAs), magnesium sulfate, C18, and graphitized carbon black (GCB). Two fortification levels of 0.05 and 0.5 mg kg-1 were assessed for method validation purposes. The obtained pesticide recoveries were in the range of 70-120 % with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 20 %. The newly developed method was allowed for the quantification of 57 pesticides residues. It was applied to pesticide residue detection in rose petals from an organic field, without treatment, compared to those from a field with classic phytosanitary treatment using fungicide and/or insecticide. We did not detect pesticide residues in rose petals from the organic field. The classically treated samples of roses contained pesticides such as chlorpyriphos and methidathion which are in accordance with the previous application of these pesticides on the roses. Insecticides were quantified at 0.05 mg kg-1 rose petal maximum. [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Tascone O.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Tascone O.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis | Roy C.,European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI | Meierhenrich U.J.,University of Nice Sophia Antipolis
Flavour and Fragrance Journal | Year: 2016

The rose species Rosa damascena and Rosa centifolia are cultivated for their use as perfume raw materials. The solvent extract of rose petals provides the concrete that is further transformed into the absolute. Both, concrete and absolute contain a variety of organic molecules. As a result of the lack of an adequate analytical procedure and the complexity of the matrices, the accurate quantification of pesticides in concrete and absolute remains challenging. Here we describe the first analytical method to quantify 57 pesticide residues in rose concrete and 56 pesticide residues in rose absolute. The method uses a multistep dispersive-solid phase extraction (d-SPE) cleanup followed by injection in a gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer. Sample preparation includes the extraction of analytes from the matrix using acetonitrile and a mixture of salts and a double clean-up step using sorbents in the form of primary and secondary amines (PSA), magnesium sulphate, C18 and graphitized carbon black (GCB). Two fortification levels, 0.025 to 0.15 and 0.5mg/kg, were assessed. For 56 pesticides, the obtained recoveries were within the range of 70% to 120 % with a relative standard deviation (RSD) lower than 20% at each spiked level. The validation parameters proved that the developed method can be used for the quantification of 57 pesticide residues in rose concrete and 56 pesticide residues in rose absolute with a limit of quantification (LOQ) ranging from 0.025 to 0.1mg/kg in concrete and from 0.05 to 0.15mg/kg in absolute, depending on the active substance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


PubMed | European Research Institute on Natural Ingredients ERINI
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry | Year: 2014

Damascena and centifolia roses are cultivated worldwide for their petal extracts that contain key odorant ingredients of perfumes. The analytical identification and quantification of pesticides in rose petals have never been described in the literature. Here, we report on a newly developed method using dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) cleanup followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of multi-residue pesticides in rose petals. Analytes were extracted from the matrix using acetonitrile and a mixture of salts containing magnesium sulfate, sodium citrate, sodium chloride, and sodium sesquihydrate. Samples were cleaned up twice by d-SPE applying primary and secondary amines (PSAs), magnesium sulfate, C18, and graphitized carbon black (GCB). Two fortification levels of 0.05 and 0.5mgkg(-1) were assessed for method validation purposes. The obtained pesticide recoveries were in the range of 70-120% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 20%. The newly developed method was allowed for the quantification of 57 pesticides residues. It was applied to pesticide residue detection in rose petals from an organic field, without treatment, compared to those from a field with classic phytosanitary treatment using fungicide and/or insecticide. We did not detect pesticide residues in rose petals from the organic field. The classically treated samples of roses contained pesticides such as chlorpyriphos and methidathion which are in accordance with the previous application of these pesticides on the roses. Insecticides were quantified at 0.05mgkg(-1) rose petal maximum.

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