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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Linac 4, which will be connected to CERN’s accelerator complex sometime between 2019 and 2020, will eventually double the beam intensity to be delivered to the Large Hadron Collider. In a bid to further crank up the luminosity — the number of collisions that occur in a given amount of time — of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) inaugurated its newest accelerator Tuesday. Once the Linear accelerator 4 (Linac 4) is connected to CERN’s accelerator complex sometime between 2019 and 2020, it will become the source of proton beams for a wide range of experiments at the LHC. Linac 4 replaces Linac 2, which itself replaced Linac 1 — the only supplier of protons to CERN's synchrotrons until 1978. Linac 3, which started up in 1994, is still operational, and it produces lead ions for LHC experiments. “We are delighted to celebrate this remarkable accomplishment. Linac 4 is a modern injector and the first key element of our ambitious upgrade programme, leading up to the High-Luminosity LHC,”  CERN Director General said Fabiola Gianotti said in a statement. “This high-luminosity phase will considerably increase the potential of the LHC experiments for discovering new physics and measuring the properties of the Higgs particle in more detail.” “New physics” is the term scientists use to describe a phenomenon that can’t be explained using the Standard Model — the framework that governs our understanding of three of the universe’s four known fundamental forces. In 2012, with the discovery of the Higgs boson, which is responsible for imparting mass to all other particles, scientists believed the last missing piece that completed the Standard Model had been found. However, even the completed version of this theory fails to incorporate gravity and explain the origin and preponderance of dark matter and dark energy in the universe. That led to scientists restarted the LHC in 2015 at an unprecedented energy of 6.5 teraelectronvolts (TeV) per beam — compared to 4 TeV per beam in 2012 — with the aim of either breaking the Standard Model, or bolstering it further. They were also looking for the fabled “graviton” which is a force-carrying particle for gravity and evidence of supersymmetry — an extension of the Standard Model that predicts the existence of more massive “super partners” for every known particle. So far, though, scientists have come away empty-handed. But this is where the new accelerator comes in. The roughly 90-meter-long (295 feet) Linac 4 will be more than thrice as strong as the currently used Linac 2, which accelerates protons to energies of about 50 megaelectronvolts (MeV). This, in turn, would allow scientists at CERN to double the beam intensity to be delivered to the LHC. More collisions means more debris, and more debris increases the odds of finding hitherto unknown particles that may reveal the much-sought after chinks in the armor of the Standard Model. “Linac 4 will send negative hydrogen ions … to CERN’s Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), which further accelerates the negative ions and removes the electrons. Linac 4 will bring the beam up to 160 MeV energy, more than three times the energy of its predecessor,” CERN explained in the statement. “The peak luminosity of the LHC is planned to be increased by a factor of five by 2025. This will make it possible for the experiments to accumulate about 10 times more data over the period 2025 to 2035 than before.”


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

At very high energies, the collision of massive atomic nuclei in an accelerator generates hundreds or even thousands of particles that undergo numerous interactions. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, Poland it has been shown that the course of this complex process can be represented by a surprisingly simple model: extremely hot matter moves away from the impact point, stretching along the original flight path in streaks, and the further the streak is from the plane of the collision, the greater its velocity. When two massive atomic nuclei collide at high energies, the most exotic form of matter is formed: the quark-gluon plasma behaving like a perfect fluid. The theoretical considerations of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Cracow, Poland show that after impact the plasma forms into streaks along the direction of impact, moving faster the further away it moves from the collision axis. The model, its predictions and the effects of their confrontation with hitherto experimental data are presented in the journal Physical Review C. Collisions of atomic nuclei occur extremely rapidly and at distances of merely hundreds of femtometres (i.e. hundreds of millionths of one billionth of a metre). The physical conditions are exceptionally sophisticated and direct observation of the phenomenon is not currently possible. In such situations, science copes by constructing theoretical models and confronting their predictions with the data collected in experiments. In the case of these collisions, however, a huge disadvantage is that the resulting conglomerate of particles is the quark-gluon plasma. Interactions between quarks and gluons are dominated by forces that are so strong and complex that modern physics is not capable of describing them precisely. "Our group decided to focus on the electromagnetic phenomena occurring during the collision because they are much easier to express in the language of mathematics. As a result, our model proved to be simple enough for us to employ the principles of energy and momentum conservation without too much trouble. Later on, we found that despite the adopted simplifications the model predictions remain at least 90% consistent with experimental data", says Dr. Andrzej Rybicki (IFJ PAN). Massive atomic nuclei accelerated to high velocities, observed in the laboratory, are flattened in the direction of motion as a result of the effects of the theory of relativity. When two such proton-neutron 'pancakes' fly towards each other, the collision is generally not central: only some of the protons and neutrons of one nucleus reach the other, entering into violent interactions and forming the quark-gluon plasma. At the same time, some of the external fragments of the nuclear pancakes do not encounter any obstacles on their way and continue their uninterrupted flight; in the jargon of physicists they are called spectators. "Our work was inspired by data collected in earlier experiments with nuclear collisions, including these made at the SPS accelerator. The electromagnetic effects occurring in these collisions that we examined showed that the quark-gluon plasma moves at a higher velocity the closer it is to the spectators", says Dr. Rybicki. In order to reproduce this course of the phenomenon, the physicists from IFJ PAN decided to divide the nuclei along the direction of movement into a series of strips - 'bricks'. Each nucleus in cross section thus looked like a pile of stacked bricks (in the model their height was one femtometre). Instead of considering the complex strong interactions and flows of momentum and energy between hundreds and thousands of particles, the model reduced the problem to several dozen parallel collisions, each occurring between two proton-neutron bricks. The IFJ PAN scientists confronted the predictions of the model with data collected from collisions of massive nuclei measured by the NA49 experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). This accelerator is located at the CERN European Nuclear Research Organization near Geneva, where one of its most important tasks now is to accelerate particles shot into the LHC accelerator. "Due to the scale of technical difficulties, the NA49 experiment's results are subject to specific measurement uncertainties that are difficult to completely reduce or eliminate. In reality, the accuracy of our model can even be greater than the already mentioned 90%. This entitles us to say that even if there were any additional, still not included, physical mechanisms in the collisions they should no longer significantly affect the theoretical framework of the model", comments doctoral student Miroslaw Kielbowicz (IFJ PAN). After developing the model of collisions of 'brick stacks', the IFJ PAN researchers discovered that a very similar theoretical structure, called the fire streak model, had been proposed by a group of physicists from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (USA) and the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre in France - already in 1978. "The previous model of fire streaks which, in fact, we mention in our publication, was built to describe other collisions occurring at lower energies. We have created our structure independently and for a different energy range", says Prof. Antoni Szczurek (IFJ PAN, University of Rzeszow) and emphasizes: "The existence of two independent models based on a similar physical idea and corresponding to measurements in different energy ranges of collisions increases the probability that the physical basis on which these models are built is correct". The Cracow fire streak model provides new information on the expansion of quark-gluon plasma in high energy collisions of massive atomic nuclei. The study of these phenomena is being further extended in the framework of another international experiment, NA61/SHINE at the SPS accelerator. The research of the IFJ PAN group is being financed by the SONATA BIS grant from the National Science Centre. The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN) is currently the largest research institute of the Polish Academy of Sciences. The broad range of studies and activities of IFJ PAN includes basic and applied research, ranging from particle physics and astrophysics, through hadron physics, high-, medium-, and low-energy nuclear physics, condensed matter physics (including materials engineering), to various applications of methods of nuclear physics in interdisciplinary research, covering medical physics, dosimetry, radiation and environmental biology, environmental protection, and other related disciplines. The average yearly yield of the IFJ PAN encompasses more than 500 scientific papers in the Journal Citation Reports published by the Thomson Reuters. The part of the Institute is the Cyclotron Centre Bronowice (CCB) which is an infrastructure, unique in Central Europe, to serve as a clinical and research centre in the area of medical and nuclear physics. IFJ PAN is a member of the Marian Smoluchowski Krakow Research Consortium: "Matter-Energy-Future" which possesses the status of a Leading National Research Centre (KNOW) in physics for the years 2012-2017. The Institute is of A+ Category (leading level in Poland) in the field of sciences and engineering. Dr. Andrzej Rybicki The Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences tel.: +48 12 6628447 email: andrzej.rybicki@ifj.edu.pl Prof. Antoni Szczurek The Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences tel. +48 12 6628212 email: antoni.szczurek@ifj.edu.pl "Implications of energy and momentum conservation for particle emission in A+A collisions at energies available at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron" http://shine. The website of the SHINE experiment. http://www. The website of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). http://www. The website of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. http://press. Press releases of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Fragments of extremely hot matter, produced in the collision of heavy atomic nuclei at the SPS accelerator at the European CERN centre, move away from each other at high velocities, forming streaks along the direction of the collision. (Source: IFJ PAN, Iwona Sputowska)


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

The inside of a prototype of a drift tube of the new linear accelerator Linac 4, the newest accelerator acquisition since the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is due to feed the CERN accelerator complex with particle beams of higher energy, is pictured during its inauguration at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin near Geneva, Switzerland, May 9, 2017. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse GENEVA (Reuters) - A new particle accelerator unveiled at CERN, the European physics research center, is expected to spawn portable accelerators that could help doctors treat cancer patients and experts analyze artwork. CERN is gradually upgrading its hardware to get more data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), its 27-km (17-mile) circular accelerator that smashes protons together at almost the speed of light to probe basic questions about the universe. Its latest upgrade, resembling a 90-metre oil pipeline hooked up to a life support machine, replaces the 39-year-old injector that produces the flow of particles for the LHC. Standing by the new Linac 4 machine, which cost 93 million Swiss francs ($93 million) and took 10 years to build, project leader Maurizio Vretenar said CERN had miniaturized the technology and saw many potential uses. "It's a brave new world of applications," he told Reuters in Linac 4's tunnel 12 meters under Geneva. CERN has already built a version to treat tumors with particle beams and licensed the patent to ADAM, a CERN spin-off owned by Advanced Oncotherapy. Another medical use is to create isotopes for diagnosing cancers. Since they decay rapidly, they normally have to be rushed to patients just in time to be used. "With our portable technology they could be made inside the hospital already," Vretenar said. His next goal is a one-metre prototype weighing about 100 kgs, with which museums could analyze paintings and jewelry. The bulk of funding for the project came in a few weeks ago. "We are building something portable," he said. "We already have a collaboration with the Louvre, and with the Italians at Florence at the Italian institute for conservation of artworks." The Louvre in Paris is the only museum in the world that already has an accelerator, and when it is closed on Tuesdays, artifacts are taken down to the basement for analysis, he said. Other museums don't have the same luxury, and may not want to send their artworks away for analysis. The results take a few hours and can show which mine a piece of jewelry came from, or detect heavy elements that date and identify the paint used, revealing restorations or fakes. There's no risk of damage, Vretenar said. "We are very careful. The intensity of particles is very low," he said. "It's not like here, there's only a few protons."


Allan, Jordan, 18-May-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — The SESAME light source was today officially opened by His Majesty King Abdullah II. An intergovernmental organization, SESAME is the first regional laboratory for the Middle East and neighbouring regions The laboratory’s official opening ushers in a new era of research covering fields ranging from medicine and biology, through materials science, physics and chemistry to healthcare, the environment, agriculture and archaeology. Speaking at the opening ceremony, the President of the SESAME Council, Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith said: “Today sees the fulfilment of many hopes and dreams. The hope that a group of initially inexperienced young people could build SESAME and make it work – they have: three weeks ago SESAME reached its full design energy. The hope that, nurtured by SESAME’s training programme, large numbers of scientists in the region would become interested in using SESAME – they have: 55 proposals to use the first two beamlines have already been submitted. And the hope that the diverse Members could work together harmoniously. As well as being a day for celebration, the opening is an occasion to look forward to the science that SESAME will produce, using photons provided by what will soon be the world’s first accelerator powered solely by renewable energy.” SESAME, which stands for Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East, is a particle accelerator-based facility that uses electromagnetic radiation emitted by circulating electron beams to study a range of properties of matter. Its initial research programme is about to get underway: three beamlines will be operational this year, and a fourth in 2019. Among the subjects likely to be studied in early experiments are pollution in the Jordan River valley with a view to improving public health in the area, as well as studies aimed at identifying new drugs for cancer therapy, and cultural heritage studies ranging from bioarcheology – the study of our ancestors – to investigations of ancient manuscripts. Professor Khaled Toukan the Director of SESAME, said “In building SESAME we had to overcome major financial, technological and political challenges, but – with the help and encouragement of many supporters in Jordan and around the world – the staff, the Directors and the Council did a superb job. Today we are at the end of the beginning. Many challenges lie ahead – including building up the user community, and constructing additional beamlines and supporting facilities. However, I am confident that – with the help of all of you here today, including especially Rolf Heuer, who will take over from Chris Llewellyn Smith as President of the Council tomorrow (and like Chris and his predecessor Herwig Schopper is a former Director General of CERN) – these challenges will be met.” The opening ceremony was an occasion for representatives of SESAME’s Members and Observers to come together to celebrate the establishment of a competitive regional facility, building regional capacity in science and technology. Photographs of the opening ceremony may be found here For further information see: 1. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world’s leading laboratories for particle physics. The Organization is located on the French-Swiss border, with its headquarters in Geneva. Its Member States are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. Cyprus and Serbia are Associate Member States in the pre-stage to Membership. India, Pakistan, Turkey and Ukraine are Associate Member States. The European Union, Japan, JINR, the Russian Federation, UNESCO and the United States of America currently have Observer status.


SINGAPORE--(Marketwired - May 18, 2017) - Zecotek Photonics Inc. (TSX VENTURE: ZMS)( : W1I)( : ZMSPF), a developer of leading-edge photonics technologies for industrial, healthcare and scientific markets, is pleased to announce that due to the superior performance of its patented LFS scintillation crystal the major OEM developing radiation monitoring and detection devices is moving forward with Zecotek to jointly develop a large area, commercially ready radiation detection unit. "We have worked closely with the scientific team of the radiation detection OEM over the past 12 months identifying the device with the best performance and the most market demand," said Dr. A.F. Zerrouk, Chairman, President, and CEO of Zecotek Photonics Inc. "We have committed to a commercially viable radiation detection device with extensive appeal to many detection applications. We look to have an operational prototype completed within the next 6 months, and look forward to the rollout of the new device with our OEM partner." As previously announced in April and June of last year, the major detection OEM ordered Zecotek's patented LFS scintillation crystals for two applications. The first was a device for large cargo screening at land crossings such as border crossings, airports, and harbours. The second order of LFS crystals were tested for screening applications for luggage, bags, packages, for high security locations including government buildings, sports stadiums, conventions centers and other crowded venues. Due to the performance and the successful testing of the LFS crystals, the two companies have committed to jointly develop a commercial unit. Increasing international tensions on homeland security, have contributed to the significant growth in the radiation safety market. Governments and private businesses need a radiation detection solution that is reliable and easy to implement. A scintillation detection system consists of scintillation crystals, photo detectors, electric signal and processing electronics. The units are smaller and more efficient than competing systems. LFS crystal based systems can be made to cover large areas and can be used in multiple application including radiation detection, assay of radioactive materials and physics research. They are less expensive to implement, have very reliable quantum efficiency and can measure both the intensity and the energy of incident radiation. Zecotek's patented Lutetium Fine Silicate (LFS) scintillation crystals have been specifically produced to provide quick and effective radiation detection of a large area. With a higher spectroscopic resolution and a decay constant that is 10 times faster and more accurate, LFS crystals are far superior than most competing crystals. The new scanning device will have the capacity for significant throughput with superior imaging performance and high resolution images. The homeland security and radiation detection represents a sizeable market opportunity for Zecotek. Industry experts predict that the market for instruments specifically designed to measure radiation is estimated to grow to US$3.5 billion by 2022. Zecotek Photonics Inc (TSX VENTURE: ZMS) ( : W1I) is a photonics technology company developing high-performance scintillation crystals, photo detectors, positron emission tomography scanning technologies, 3D auto-stereoscopic displays, 3D metal printing, and lasers for applications in medical, high-tech and industrial sectors. Founded in 2004, Zecotek operates three divisions: Imaging Systems, Optronics Systems and 3D Display Systems with labs located in Canada, Korea, Russia, Singapore and U.S.A. The management team is focused on building shareholder value by commercializing over 50 patented and patent pending novel photonic technologies directly and through strategic alliances with Hamamatsu Photonics (Japan), the European Organization for Nuclear Research (Switzerland), Beijing Opto-Electronics Technology Co. Ltd. (China), NuCare Medical Systems (South Korea), the University of Washington (United States), and National NanoFab Center (South Korea). For more information visit www.zecotek.com and follow @zecotek on Twitter. This press release may contain forward-looking statements that are based on management's expectations, estimates, projections and assumptions. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve certain risks and uncertainties, which are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual future results and trends may differ materially from what may have been stated. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Service Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of the content of this news release. If you would like to receive news from Zecotek in the future please visit the corporate website at www.zecotek.com


SINGAPORE--(Marketwired - May 25, 2017) - Zecotek Photonics Inc. (TSX VENTURE: ZMS) ( : W1I) ( : ZMSPF), a developer of leading-edge photonics technologies for healthcare, industrial and scientific markets, is pleased to announce that two additional Chinese, tier 1 positron emission tomography (PET) OEM integrators have successfully tested and qualified its patented LFS scintillation crystals for use in their current product lines of PET medical scanners. "Our exclusive supply agreement with EBO Optoelectronics is starting to take shape with now three tier 1 PET OEMs having tested and qualified our patented LFS scintillation crystals for use in their respective medical scanners," said Dr. A.F. Zerrouk, Chairman, President, and CEO of Zecotek Photonics Inc. "These three tier 1 OEMs have decided that the LFS crystal has all the economical and physical characteristics needed for their long-term production of PET medical scanners." EBO Optoelectronics is the largest crystal array producer and supplier in China and uses Zecotek's LFS scintillation crystals exclusively for their PET arrays. It has an extensive and impressive international customer list including the top PET OEMs in the world, and exclusively serves China, the second largest medical device market in the world. As China experiences rapid economic growth and an aging population, the Chinese government has made significant investments in the medical system directly and through regulations and incentives. Domestic OEMs have taken advantage of these resources and are now producing leading medical scanners. Medical administrators in North America and Europe now look to China for leading edge medical technology like PET scanning devices. Zecotek has created a strategic partnership with EBO Optoelectronics with the goal of becoming the leading supplier of scintillation crystals and other the key components in China and around the world. About Shanghai EBO Optoelectronics Co. Ltd. Founded in 2007 and headquartered in Shanghai, EBO has more than 120 employees and 4,000 square meters of manufacturing space. Shanghai EBO fabricates and supplies crystal arrays to an extensive customer base which includes: Neusoft Medical Systems, Samsung Medical, Topgrade Healthcare, FMI Medical Systems, IHEP of CAS, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, and many domestic and foreign universities and research institutions. EBO has the highest standard processing production line and offers shaped crystal customization and crystal array assembly to end users. About Zecotek Zecotek Photonics Inc. (TSX VENTURE: ZMS) ( : W1I) ( : ZMSPF) is a photonics technology company developing high-performance scintillation crystals, photo detectors, positron emission tomography scanning technologies, 3D auto-stereoscopic displays, 3D metal printing, and lasers for applications in medical, high-tech and industrial sectors. Founded in 2004, Zecotek operates three divisions: Imaging Systems, Optronics Systems and 3D Display Systems with labs located in Canada, Korea, Russia, Singapore and U.S.A. The management team is focused on building shareholder value by commercializing over 50 patented and patent pending novel photonic technologies directly and through strategic alliances and joint ventures with leading industry partners including Hamamatsu Photonics (Japan), the European Organization for Nuclear Research (Switzerland), Beijing Opto-Electronics Technology Co. Ltd. (China), NuCare Medical Systems (South Korea), the University of Washington (United States), and National NanoFab Center (South Korea). For more information visit www.zecotek.com, follow @zecotek on Twitter. This press release may contain forward-looking statements that are based on management's expectations, estimates, projections and assumptions. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve certain risks and uncertainties, which are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual future results and trends may differ materially from what may have been stated. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Service Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of the content of this news release. If you would like to receive news from Zecotek in the future please visit the corporate website at www.zecotek.com.


By observing collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)—one of the world’s largest scientific research organizations—are learning more about the “primordial soup” that existed just after the Big Bang . In experiments, scientists have now shown proton collisions can produce a large number of strange particles—the first time this has been observed in collisions with anything other than heavy nuclei. A few billionths of a second after the Big Bang—currently the most widely accepted theory of how the universe was formed—elementary particles, including protons and neutrons, did not exist.


Presented in vivid Ultra HD 4K, The Hunt for Dark Matter takes viewers on an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look inside the 16-mile-long Large Hadron Collider tunnel, the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator housed underground at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) on the French/Swiss border.  Here, several teams are collaborating to upgrade the world's largest particle physics experiments.  One of the most far-reaching components of this program is the CMS High-Granularity Calorimeter (HGC).  In layman's terms, the HGC is essentially the highest resolution slow-motion camera ever built. This colossally sensitive system is comprised of more than 22,000 sensors capable of capturing an image every 25 nanoseconds.  With that power, the HGC will collect 10 TB of data per second, the equivalent of a 1,000-word essay being written by every human on the planet every second, all in the search for clues about the most basic building blocks of our Universe, including the elusive dark matter particles. "The first evidence of dark matter was discovered in 1938, and for the first time, we now have the technology capable of actually detecting it directly and of producing it with accelerators and inferring its presence by means of a multitude of ingenious techniques," said Joseph Incandela, Ph.D., Professor of Physics at the University of California at Santa Barbara, who was also part of the team that discovered the Higgs Boson elementary particle in 2012.  "The data we glean from this project could help us to take the next big step forward in understanding the formation of our Universe, how it evolved, how we got here, and possibly where we're headed." The film by Daniel H. Birman Productions, the team behind the CuriosityStream Original Conscious Capitalism, also features insightful interviews with world-renowned physicists, engineers, astronomers and astrophysicists including David Barney, Ph.D., physicist and project manager at CERN, and Richard Ellis, Ph.D., professor of astrophysics at University College London. "In addition to the fascinating science behind The Hunt for Dark Matter, there's also a powerful story of humanity within this film," Birman said.  "CERN and the work performed there are international pursuits, with thousands of scientists and engineers from countries all over the world, working side-by-side in one common effort: the quest for discovery.  This film beautifully highlights the global reach of science and its power to unify us as a planet, regardless of the political or cultural differences and boundaries that might separate us." The Hunt for Dark Matter is available to watch now by starting a free trial at www.CuriosityStream.com. CuriosityStream is the world's first ad-free, on-demand streaming service for documentary and nonfiction programming.  Over 1,500 shows from the world's best filmmakers are available to watch on most streaming devices, including Xbox One, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast, iOS and Android, starting at just $2.99 per month.  Focused on offering enriching and enlightening content covering science, history, technology and nature, CuriosityStream was founded by Discovery Communications founder and media visionary John Hendricks. For more information, visit www.curiositystream.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/curiositystream-original-film-dives-deep-into-the-hunt-for-dark-matter-explores-the-ultimate-cosmic-mystery-300451369.html


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: phys.org

In this undated picture publicly provided by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, employees and scientists prepare the upgrading of one of the four main experiments on the world's biggest atom smasher in the hope it will help them discover previously unknown particles or physical properties at CERN near Geneva. Officials at CERN, said the operations the equivalent of a "heart transplant" for the CMS experiment. CMS was key to confirming the existence of the Higgs boson particle in 2012. (CERN via AP) Scientists are upgrading one of the four main experiments on the world's biggest atom smasher in hopes it will help them discover previously unknown particles or physical properties. Officials at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, say the operation Thursday is the equivalent of a "heart transplant" for the CMS experiment. CMS was key to confirming the existence of the Higgs boson particle in 2012. The new, U.S.-built pixel detector is used to track particles as they hurtle through the 27-kilometer (17-mile) Large Hadron Collider beneath the Swiss-French border. CERN spokesman Arnaud Marsollier likened the $17-million detector to a huge 3D-camera capable of capturing 120 million pixels at 40 million frames a second. It replaces an older device that recorded about 68 million pixels. Explore further: Famed atom smasher gets twice the energy next year (Update)


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

(AP) — Scientists are upgrading one of the four main experiments on the world's biggest atom smasher in hopes it will help them discover previously unknown particles or physical properties. Officials at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, say the operation Thursday is the equivalent of a "heart transplant" for the CMS experiment. CMS was key to confirming the existence of the Higgs boson particle in 2012. The new, U.S.-built pixel detector is used to track particles as they hurtle through the 27-kilometer (17-mile) Large Hadron Collider beneath the Swiss-French border. CERN spokesman Arnaud Marsollier likened the $17-million detector to a huge 3D-camera capable of capturing 120 million pixels at 40 million frames a second. It replaces an older device that recorded about 68 million pixels.

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