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Hannemann M.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI | Hannemann M.,International Max Planck Research School Molecular Biology | Sasidharan N.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI | Sasidharan N.,International Max Planck Research School Neuroscience | And 10 more authors.
PLoS Genetics | Year: 2012

Dense core vesicles (DCVs) are thought to be generated at the late Golgi apparatus as immature DCVs, which subsequently undergo a maturation process through clathrin-mediated membrane remodeling events. This maturation process is required for efficient processing of neuropeptides within DCVs and for removal of factors that would otherwise interfere with DCV release. Previously, we have shown that the GTPase, RAB-2, and its effector, RIC-19, are involved in DCV maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans motoneurons. In rab-2 mutants, specific cargo is lost from maturing DCVs and missorted into the endosomal/lysosomal degradation route. Cargo loss could be prevented by blocking endosomal delivery. This suggests that RAB-2 is involved in retention of DCV components during the sorting process at the Golgi-endosomal interface. To understand how RAB-2 activity is regulated at the Golgi, we screened for RAB-2-specific GTPase activating proteins (GAPs). We identified a potential RAB-2 GAP, TBC-8, which is exclusively expressed in neurons and which, when depleted, shows similar DCV maturation defects as rab-2 mutants. We could demonstrate that RAB-2 binds to its putative GAP, TBC-8. Interestingly, TBC-8 also binds to the RAB-2 effector, RIC-19. This interaction appears to be conserved as TBC-8 also interacted with the human ortholog of RIC-19, ICA69. Therefore, we propose that a dynamic ON/OFF cycling of RAB-2 at the Golgi induced by the GAP/effector complex is required for proper DCV maturation. © 2012 Hannemann et al.


Sugie A.,German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases | Hakeda-Suzuki S.,Tokyo Institute of Technology | Silies M.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI | Shimozono M.,Tokyo Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
Neuron | Year: 2015

Neural activity contributes to the regulation of the properties of synapses in sensory systems, allowing for adjustment to a changing environment. Little is known about how synaptic molecular components are regulated to achieve activity-dependent plasticity at central synapses. Here, we found that after prolonged exposure to natural ambient light the presynaptic active zone in Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes reversible remodeling, including loss of Bruchpilot, DLiprin-α, and DRBP, but not of DSyd-1 or Cacophony. The level of depolarization of the postsynaptic neurons is critical for the light-induced changes in active zone composition in thephotoreceptors, indicating the existence of a feedback signal. In search of this signal, we have identified a crucial role of microtubule meshwork organization downstream of the divergent canonical Wnt pathway, potentially via Kinesin-3 Imac. These data reveal that active zone composition can be regulated invivo and identify the underlying molecular machinery. Sugie etal. show that presynaptic active zones can undergo molecular remodeling invivo. Activation of postsynaptic neurons feeds back to control Drosophila photoreceptor active zone composition via the divergent canonical Wnt pathway and the regulation of microtubule stability. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | European Neuroscience Institute ENI, Tokyo Institute of Technology and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neuron | Year: 2015

Neural activity contributes to the regulation of the properties of synapses in sensory systems, allowing for adjustment to a changing environment. Little is known about how synaptic molecular components are regulated to achieve activity-dependent plasticity at central synapses. Here, we found that after prolonged exposure to natural ambient light the presynaptic active zone in Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes reversible remodeling, including loss of Bruchpilot, DLiprin-, and DRBP, but not of DSyd-1 or Cacophony. The level of depolarization of the postsynaptic neurons is critical for the light-induced changes in active zone composition in the photoreceptors, indicating the existence of a feedback signal. In search of this signal, we have identified a crucial role of microtubule meshwork organization downstream of the divergent canonical Wnt pathway, potentially via Kinesin-3 Imac. These data reveal that active zone composition can be regulated in vivo and identify the underlying molecular machinery.


PubMed | European Neuroscience Institute ENI, Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, RWTH Aachen and University of Gottingen
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The EMBO journal | Year: 2016

Mutations in the FBXO7 (PARK15) gene have been implicated in a juvenile form of parkinsonism termed parkinsonian pyramidal syndrome (PPS), characterized by Parkinsonian symptoms and pyramidal tract signs. FBXO7 (F-box protein only 7) is a subunit of the SCF (SKP1/cullin-1/F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, but its relevance and function in neurons remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that the E3 ligase FBXO7-SCF binds to and ubiquitinates the proteasomal subunit PSMA2. In addition, we show that FBXO7 is a proteasome-associated protein involved in proteasome assembly. In FBXO7 knockout mice, we find reduced proteasome activity and early-onset motor deficits together with premature death. In addition, we demonstrate that NEX (neuronal helix-loop-helix protein-1)-Cre-induced deletion of the FBXO7 gene in forebrain neurons or the loss of FBXO7 in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons results in motor defects, reminiscent of the phenotype in PARK15 patients. Taken together, our study establishes a vital role for FBXO7 in neurons, which is required for proper motor control and accentuates the importance of FBXO7 in proteasome function.


Cao M.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Milosevic I.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | Milosevic I.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI | Giovedi S.,Howard Hughes Medical Institute | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Neuroscience | Year: 2014

Several proteins encoded by PD genes are implicated in synaptic vesicle traffic. Endophilin, a key factor in the endocytosis of synaptic vesicles, was shown to bind to, and be ubiquitinated by, the PD-linked E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin. Here we report that Parkin’s level is specifically upregulated in brain and fibroblasts of endophilin mutant mice due to increased transcriptional regulation. Studies of transfected HEK293T cells show that Parkin ubiquitinates not only endophilin, but also its major binding partners, dynamin and synaptojanin 1. These results converge with the recently reported functional relationship of endophilin to the PD gene LRRK2 and with the identification of a PD-linked synaptojanin 1 mutation, in providing evidence for a link between PD and endocytosis genes. ©2014 the authors.


Kuczera T.,University of Gottingen | Kuczera T.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI | Bayram O.,University of Gottingen | Sari F.,University of Gottingen | And 3 more authors.
Cell Cycle | Year: 2010

Progression through mitosis requires the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) associated with regulatory cyclin subunits. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Clb2 has the most important role among the four mitotic cyclins, Clb1-4, manifested by data showing that simultaneous deletion of the CLB1, CLB3 and CLB4 genes has only minor effects on mitosis. Thus, Clb2 alone is sufficient for all essential CDK functions in mitosis, such as the assembly of bipolar spindles and spindle elongation. Here, we show that a modification of Clb2, by the C-terminal addition of a Myc12 epitope, causes the loss of one specific mitotic function of Clb2. Strains carrying CLB2-MYC12 are nonviable in the absence of the CLB3 and CLB4 genes, because the modified Clb2 version fails to promote assembly of the mitotic spindle. In contrast, Clb2-Myc12 has no apparent defects in late mitotic functions and, furthermore, induces the switch from polarized to isotropic growth with similar efficiency as the endogenous Clb2. Thus, the presence of the Myc12 epitope selectively inactivates Clb2's capacity to promote spindle formation. Clb2-Myc12 represents therefore the first version of Clb2 impaired in one specific mitotic function. We conclude that the major mitotic functions of this cyclin can be unequivocally dissected. © 2010 Landes Bioscience.


Ramachandran B.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI | Ahmed S.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI | Zafar N.,University of Goettingen Medical School | Dean C.,European Neuroscience Institute ENI
Hippocampus | Year: 2015

Ethanol inhibits memory encoding and the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 neurons of the hippocampus. Hippocampal LTP at Schaffer collateral synapses onto CA1 pyramidal neurons has been widely studied as a cellular model of learning and memory, but there is striking heterogeneity in the underlying molecular mechanisms in distinct regions and in response to distinct stimuli. Basal and apical dendrites differ in terms of innervation, input specificity, and molecular mechanisms of LTP induction and maintenance, and different stimuli determine distinct molecular pathways of potentiation. However, lamina or stimulus-dependent effects of ethanol on LTP have not been investigated. Here, we tested the effect of acute application of 60 mM ethanol on LTP induction in distinct dendritic compartments (apical versus basal) of CA1 neurons, and in response to distinct stimulation paradigms (single versus repeated, spaced high frequency stimulation). We found that ethanol completely blocks LTP in apical dendrites, whereas it reduces the magnitude of LTP in basal dendrites. Acute ethanol treatment for just 15 min altered pre- and post-synaptic protein expression. Interestingly, ethanol increases the neurosteroid allopregnanolone, which causes ethanol-dependent inhibition of LTP, more prominently in apical dendrites, where ethanol has greater effects on LTP. This suggests that ethanol has general effects on fundamental properties of synaptic plasticity, but the magnitude of its effect on LTP differs depending on hippocampal sub-region and stimulus strength. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


PubMed | European Neuroscience Institute ENI
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Hippocampus | Year: 2014

Ethanol inhibits memory encoding and the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 neurons of the hippocampus. Hippocampal LTP at Schaffer collateral synapses onto CA1 pyramidal neurons has been widely studied as a cellular model of learning and memory, but there is striking heterogeneity in the underlying molecular mechanisms in distinct regions and in response to distinct stimuli. Basal and apical dendrites differ in terms of innervation, input specificity, and molecular mechanisms of LTP induction and maintenance, and different stimuli determine distinct molecular pathways of potentiation. However, lamina or stimulus-dependent effects of ethanol on LTP have not been investigated. Here, we tested the effect of acute application of 60 mM ethanol on LTP induction in distinct dendritic compartments (apical versus basal) of CA1 neurons, and in response to distinct stimulation paradigms (single versus repeated, spaced high frequency stimulation). We found that ethanol completely blocks LTP in apical dendrites, whereas it reduces the magnitude of LTP in basal dendrites. Acute ethanol treatment for just 15 min altered pre- and post-synaptic protein expression. Interestingly, ethanol increases the neurosteroid allopregnanolone, which causes ethanol-dependent inhibition of LTP, more prominently in apical dendrites, where ethanol has greater effects on LTP. This suggests that ethanol has general effects on fundamental properties of synaptic plasticity, but the magnitude of its effect on LTP differs depending on hippocampal sub-region and stimulus strength.


PubMed | European Neuroscience Institute ENI
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PLoS genetics | Year: 2012

Dense core vesicles (DCVs) are thought to be generated at the late Golgi apparatus as immature DCVs, which subsequently undergo a maturation process through clathrin-mediated membrane remodeling events. This maturation process is required for efficient processing of neuropeptides within DCVs and for removal of factors that would otherwise interfere with DCV release. Previously, we have shown that the GTPase, RAB-2, and its effector, RIC-19, are involved in DCV maturation in Caenorhabditis elegans motoneurons. In rab-2 mutants, specific cargo is lost from maturing DCVs and missorted into the endosomal/lysosomal degradation route. Cargo loss could be prevented by blocking endosomal delivery. This suggests that RAB-2 is involved in retention of DCV components during the sorting process at the Golgi-endosomal interface. To understand how RAB-2 activity is regulated at the Golgi, we screened for RAB-2-specific GTPase activating proteins (GAPs). We identified a potential RAB-2 GAP, TBC-8, which is exclusively expressed in neurons and which, when depleted, shows similar DCV maturation defects as rab-2 mutants. We could demonstrate that RAB-2 binds to its putative GAP, TBC-8. Interestingly, TBC-8 also binds to the RAB-2 effector, RIC-19. This interaction appears to be conserved as TBC-8 also interacted with the human ortholog of RIC-19, ICA69. Therefore, we propose that a dynamic ON/OFF cycling of RAB-2 at the Golgi induced by the GAP/effector complex is required for proper DCV maturation.


PubMed | European Neuroscience Institute ENI, Catholic University of Leuven, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and University of Gottingen
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cell reports | Year: 2016

Endophilin-A, a well-characterized endocytic adaptor essential for synaptic vesicle recycling, has recently been linked to neurodegeneration. We report here that endophilin-A deficiency results in impaired movement, age-dependent ataxia, and neurodegeneration in mice. Transcriptional analysis of endophilin-A mutant mice, complemented by proteomics, highlighted ataxia- and protein-homeostasis-related genes and revealed upregulation of the E3-ubiquitin ligase FBXO32/atrogin-1 and its transcription factor FOXO3A. FBXO32 overexpression triggers apoptosis in cultured cells and neurons but, remarkably, coexpression of endophilin-A rescues it. FBXO32 interacts with all three endophilin-A proteins. Similarly to endophilin-A, FBXO32 tubulates membranes and localizes on clathrin-coated structures. Additionally, FBXO32 and endophilin-A are necessary for autophagosome formation, and both colocalize transiently with autophagosomes. Our results point to a role for endophilin-A proteins in autophagy and protein degradation, processes that are impaired in their absence, potentially contributing to neurodegeneration and ataxia.

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