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News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK, February 21, 2017-- Susanne Ullman has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Dr. Ullman is a dermatologist and educator who has been excelling in her career since establishing herself professionally in 1974. Now a professor of dermatology for the Bispebjerg Hospital at the University of Copenhagen, she demonstrates an expertise in diseases of the skin. Previously, Dr. Ullman came to prominence as a professor of dermatology at Righospitalet at the University of Copenhagen and a visiting professor at the University of Minnesota. Other noteworthy roles held in her career include coordinator for education of dermatologists in Denmark, and visiting professor at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia and Hunan Medical University in China. In recognition of her professional excellence, she was selected for inclusion into Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, and Who's Who in the World.Before establishing herself professionally, Dr. Ullman prepared for her career by investing in her education. She earned an MD from the University of Copenhagen in 1965, a specialty degree in dermatology in 1976 and a Doctor of Medical Sciences in 1988. To stay at the top of her field, Dr. Ullman is a member of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology and the American Academy of Dermatology. In addition, she has shared her insights and expertise through numerous articles to professional journals and she is still active in scientific projects.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: news.mit.edu

The School of Engineering will welcome 13 new faculty members to its departments, institutes, labs, and centers during the 2016-17 academic year. With research and teaching activities ranging from nuclear fusion to computational complexity theory, they are poised to make vast contributions to new directions across the school and to a range of labs and centers across the Institute. “We are pleased to welcome such a talented group of faculty to engineering at MIT this year,” says Ian A. Waitz, dean of the School of Engineering. “Every year we broaden the scope and the scale of what we can do, and of how we think about engineering. Our new faculty are often the ones who show us the way forward.” The new School of Engineering faculty members are: Adam Belay will join the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in July 2017. He holds a PhD in computer science from Stanford University, where he was a member of the secure computer systems group and the multiscale architecture and systems team. Previously, he worked on storage virtualization at VMware Inc. and contributed substantial power-management code to the Linux Kernel project. Belay’s research area is operating systems and networking. Much of his work has focused on restructuring computer systems so that developers can more easily reach the full performance potential of hardware. He received a Stanford graduate fellowship, a VMware graduate fellowship, and an OSDI Jay Lepreau best paper award. Matteo Bucci will join the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE) faculty as an assistant professor in the fall of 2016. He received his PhD in nuclear engineering from the University of Pisa in Italy in 2009. A research scientist in NSE since 2015, Bucci was previously at Commissariat à l’énergie atomique in France, where he led several research projects in experimental and computational thermal-hydraulics for light water reactors and sodium fast reactors. His research will focus in two main areas: heat transfer nanoengineering innovations to improve the safety and economic competitiveness of nuclear reactors, and advanced diagnostics and intelligent systems to improve situational awareness, fault detection and diagnostics, and anticipated failures in nuclear power plants. Bucci is an active member of the Consortium for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, one of the MIT’s eight Low-Carbon Energy Centers. Tal Cohen will join the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering as an assistant professor in November 2016. After she received her PhD in aerospace engineering in 2013 from Technion University in Israel, she came to MIT for a two-year postdoctoral position in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. She is currently a postdoc at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. Cohen works in mechanics, especially the mechanics of structures subjected to extreme loading conditions and shock wave propagation. Her work on the mechanics of stretchable materials that can undergo extreme deformations up to loss of stability, and on the mechanics of growth in both biology and engineering, exploits analogies with related fields. By employing complex nonlinear material models, Cohen’s research group will focus on deriving theoretical models that can significantly affect our understanding of observed phenomena but are still simple enough to be applied in design or characterization of materials. Zachary Hartwig will join the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering in January 2017 as an assistant professor. He will also receive a co-appointment at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC). He received his PhD from MIT in 2014 for the development of a novel accelerator-based technique that advanced the ability to study the dynamic interaction of confined plasmas and the surrounding solid materials — known as plasma-material interactions — in fusion devices. Since 2014, he has been a postdoc at the PSFC, continuing to develop diagnostic techniques for plasma-material interactions, leading the establishment of a new laboratory for accelerator-based nuclear science, and leading the design of high-magnetic field net energy gain fusion devices that leverage new superconducting magnet technology. Hartwig’s research will focus on the development and application of particle accelerators, radiation detectors, and computational radiation transport simulations to magnetic fusion energy, nuclear security, and radiation damage in nuclear materials. He presently holds a U.S. Department of Energy ORISE Fellowship in the fusion energy sciences and is the recipient of the Del Favero doctoral thesis prize. Ali Jadbabaie joined the MIT faculty as a full professor with dual appointments in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society in July 2016. He is currently the JR East Professor of Engineering, the director of the Sociotechnical Systems Research Center, and the associate director of the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society at MIT. He is also a principal investigator in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. Jadbabaie received his BS from Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, Iran, his MS in electrical and computer engineering from the University of New Mexico, and his PhD in control and dynamical systems from Caltech. After a year as a postdoc at Yale University, he joined the faculty at University of Pennsylvania in July 2002. At Penn he was named an associate professor with tenure in 2008, a full professor in 2011, and the Alfred Fitler Moore Professor of Network Science in 2013. He also held appointments in computer and information science and operations as well as information and decisions in the Wharton School of Business. Jadbabaie is the inaugural editor-in-chief of IEEE Transactions on Network Science and Engineering, an interdisciplinary journal sponsored by several IEEE societies. He is a recipient of a National Science Foundation Career Award, an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award. In 2015, he received the Vannevar Bush Fellowship (formerly known as National Security Science and an Engineering Faculty Fellowship) from the office of Secretary of Defense. Jadbabaie’s students have won and been finalists of numerous best paper awards at various ACC and CDC conferences. He is also an IEEE fellow. He has made foundational contributions to the field of collective autonomy and opinion dynamics, and his current research interests include the interplay of dynamic systems and networks with specific emphasis on multi-agent coordination and control, distributed optimization, network science, and network economics. Carmen Guerra-Garcia will join the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics as an assistant professor in the fall of 2017. Graduating from the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid with an aeronautical engineering degree in 2007, Guerra-Garcia then matriculated in the Space Propulsion Laboratory at MIT. She completed her PhD with a concentration in plasma physics and propulsion and a minor in numerical methods in 2014. Following a one-year postdoctoral position with Professor Paulo Lozano, Guerra-Garcia relocated to Boeing Madrid for a year. Her research will focus on the study of plasmas for aerospace applications, including plasma-assisted combustion, space propulsion, and lightning strikes on aircraft. Stefanie Mueller will join the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in January 2017. She received her PhD in human-computer interaction (HCI) from the Hasso Plattner Institute in 2016, where she also received an MS in IT-systems engineering. In her research, Mueller develops novel interactive hardware and software systems that advance personal fabrication technologies. Her work has been published at the most selective HCI venues — Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Conference for Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), and User Interface Software and Technology (UIST) — and received a best paper award and two best-paper nominees. Mueller is an associate chair of the program committees at ACM, CHI, and UIST, and is a general co-chair for the ACM SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computational Fabrication that will take place at MIT in June 2017. She has been an invited speaker at MIT, Stanford, the University of California at Berkeley, Harvard, Carnegie Mellon University, Cornell University, Microsoft Research, Disney Research, Adobe Research, and others. In addition, her work has been covered widely in New Scientist, BBC, The Atlantic, and The Guardian. Mueller will head the HCI engineering group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, which works at the intersection of human-computer interaction, computer graphics, computer vision, and robotics. Jennifer Rupp will join the Department of Materials Science and Engineering as an assistant professor in January 2017. She studied at the University of Vienna before receiving a PhD in Materials at ETH Zurich. Rupp is a French and German native and is currently an assistant professor of electrochemical materials at ETH Zurich in Switzerland. She was a researcher at the National Institute of Materials Science in Tsukuba, Japan, in 2011, and previously collaborated with MIT professors Tuller and Yildiz. Her research is primarily in solid-state information memory systems, energy storage, and energy harvesting devices. She has worked on new material architectures and ionic transport-structure relations for solid-state ionic conductor thin films, electrochemistry and system aspects for memristors, solid-state batteries, solar-to-fuel conversion, and micro-fuel cells. Rupp’s awards include “top 40 scientist speaker under the age of 40” at the World Economic Forum, Spark Award for most innovative and economic invention by ETH Zurich, and Kepler Award for New Energy Materials by the European Academy of Science. Max Shulaker joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor in July. He received his BS, master’s, and PhD in electrical engineering at Stanford, where he was a Fannie and John Hertz Fellow and a Stanford Graduate Fellow. Shulaker’s research focuses on the broad area of nanosystems. His Novel Electronic Systems Group aims to understand and optimize multidisciplinary interactions across the entire computing stack — from low-level synthesis of nanomaterials, to fabrication processes and circuit design for emerging nanotechnologies, up to new architectures — to enable the next generation of high performance and energy-efficient computing systems. Zachary P. Smith will join the Department of Chemical Engineering as an assistant professor in January, 2017. Smith earned his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Pennsylvania State’s Schreyer Honors College, and completed his PhD in chemical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he worked under the guidance of Benny Freeman and Don Paul. While at UT Austin, Smith developed structure/property relationships for gas diffusion and sorption in polymer membranes. His postdoctoral training with Jeffrey Long at the UC Berkeley examined the design of coordination solid (i.e. metal-organic frameworks) for selective adsorption based separations. His research focuses on the molecular-level design, synthesis, and characterization of polymers and inorganic materials for applications in membrane and adsorption-based separations. These efforts are promising for gas-phase separations critical to the energy industry and to the environment, such as the purification of olefins and the capture of CO from flue stacks at coal-fired power plants. Smith has co-authored over 20 peer-reviewed papers and been recognized with several awards, including the DoE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship. He was also selected as a U.S. delegate to the Lindau Nobel Laureate meeting on Chemistry in 2013. David Sontag will join the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in January 2017 as an assistant professor, and he will be part of the Institute for Medical Engineering (IMES) and Science and the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He has been an assistant professor in computer science and data science at New York University’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences since 2011. Previously, he was a postdoc at Microsoft Research New England. Sontag’s research interests are in machine learning and artificial intelligence with a recent focus on unsupervised learning, a problem of discovering hidden variables from data, and causal inference, which seeks to estimate the effect of interventions from observational data. As part of IMES, he will lead a research group that aims to transform health care through the use of machine learning. Sontag received the Sprowls award for his PhD thesis at MIT in 2010, best paper awards at the conferences EMNLP, UAI, and NIPS, and a National Science Foundation Early Career award in 2014. Ryan Williams will join MIT as an associate professor (with tenure) in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in January 2017, pending the approval of his tenure case by the Executive Committee. He received an BA in computer science and mathematics from Cornell, and a PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon. Following postdoctoral appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton) and IBM Almaden, he was an assistant professor of computer science at Stanford for five years. Williams’s research interests are in the theoretical design and analysis of efficient algorithms and in computational complexity theory, focusing mainly on new connections (and consequences) forged between algorithm design and logical circuit complexity. Along with some best paper awards, Williams has received a Sloan Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award, a Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship, and was an invited speaker at the 2014 International Congress of Mathematicians. Virginia Vassilevska Williams will join electrical engineering and computer science as an associate professor in January 2017, pending the approval of her case by Academic Council. She received a BS in mathematics and engineering and applied science from Caltech and a PhD in computer science from Carnegie Mellon. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton), UC Berkeley, and Stanford. Prior to joining MIT, she spent three and a half years as an assistant professor at Stanford. Her research interests are broadly in theoretical computer science, focusing on the design and analysis of algorithms and fine-grained complexity. Her work on matrix multiplication algorithms was covered by the press and is the most cited paper in algorithms and complexity in the last five years.


News Article | January 7, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

The famous Ötzi, a man murdered about 5,300 years ago in the Italian Alps, had what's now considered the world's oldest known case of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that can cause ulcers and gastric cancer, a new study finds. It's unclear whether the ancient iceman did, in fact, have ulcers or gastric cancer because his stomach tissue didn't survive. Today, about half of the world's human population has H. pylori in their gut, but only one in 10 people develop a condition from the bacteria, the researchers said. However, an analysis of tissues from Ötzi's gastrointestinal tract shows that his immune system had reacted to the potentially virulent strain, suggesting he might have felt ill from H. pylori symptoms on the day he died. [Mummy Melodrama: Top 9 Secrets About Otzi the Iceman] "We showed the presence of marker proteins which we see today in patients infected with Helicobacter," study lead author Frank Maixner, a microbiologist at the European Academy in Bozen/Bolzano in Italy, said in a statement. The researchers also analyzed the specific H. pylori strain that Ötzi carried. They found that, although it was unique, it was strikingly similar to a strain seen in ancient Asia but not to those in northern Africa as the researchers had suspected. Hikers discovered Ötzi's mummified body in a glacier in 1991, and his remains now reside at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, Italy. Studies on the Copper Age man suggest that Ötzi likely lived with aches and pains — during his lifetime, he had bad teeth and knees; a genetic predisposition to heart disease; lactose intolerance; arthritis; a possible case of Lyme disease; and wounds indicating that he suffered from an arrow injury and a blow to the head before he died at somewhere between 40 and 50 years old. Despite these maladies, Ötzi probably would have lived for another 10 to 20 years if he hadn't been murdered, study co-author Albert Zink, the head of the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman at the European Academy, said during a news conference yesterday (Jan. 6). The researchers were curious about whether Ötzi carried the ancient form of H. pylori, which research suggests has existed in humans for at least 100,000 years. But the new study was no easy undertaking. The scientists defrosted the heavily tattooed mummy and used an incision made by an earlier inspection of Ötzi to take tissue samples. The team extracted 12 biopsy samples from the stomach and intestine, and analyzed the genetic material from each. "We had to separate the Helicobacter pylori sequences from the other genetic material," which included the DNA from the iceman himself, food he had eaten, soil bacteria that invaded the body, and other material, study co-senior author Thomas Rattei, the head of the Division of Computational Systems Biology at the University of Vienna in Austria, said at the news conference. "This was like searching [for] a needle in the haystack." But they did find it. Moreover, Ötzi's H. pylori strain was heavily fragmented because of degradation, providing more evidence that it wasn't the result of modern contamination but rather the actual ancient strain that had infected him during the Copper Age, Rattei said. [Album: A New Face for Ötzi the Iceman Mummy] After sequencing the ancient H. pylori strain, the researchers compared it to other known strains of the pathogen. Interestingly, scientists can use H. pylori as a tool to study human migration. The human genome typically mutates slowly over time, but H. pylori mutates quickly. It changes so fast, in fact, that it's usually unique to each geographic population. What's more, if one group of people encounters another — by migrating to a new area, for instance — their H. pylori strains can mix, leaving genetic clues about the mixed strain's background. Furthermore, these H. pylori strains infect only humans, so it can't be carried by other animals, the researchers said. "That is why we studied Helicobacter pylori and why it's so important for illustrating all of these wonderful prehistoric human migrations," said co-senior author Yoshan Moodley, a professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of Venda in South Africa.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RICHLAND, Wash. - Two researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been elected to membership in the prestigious National Academy of Engineering. Ruby Leung and Johannes Lercher are among the 106 new members elected worldwide to the 2017 class. The NAE is a private, independent, nonprofit institution that is part of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. NAE focuses on maintaining a strong engineering community and bringing together experts to provide independent advice to the federal government on engineering and technology challenges. Lercher and Leung join emeritus staff member Subhash Singhal, who is a National Academy of Sciences member, as PNNL researchers in the National Academies. "I am thrilled that the exceptional contributions of two of our researchers have been recognized by the National Academy of Engineering," said PNNL director Steven Ashby. "Membership in the NAE is among the highest honors that a researcher can achieve, and Ruby and Johannes are most deserving. Congratulations to both of them!" Ruby Leung is an atmospheric scientist at PNNL and also an affiliate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. She was elected based on her leadership in regional and global computer modeling of the Earth's climate and water cycles. Leung's research has advanced understanding and modeling of the regional and global water cycles, with implications for managing water, agriculture and energy. She has organized key workshops sponsored by environmental agencies, served on panels that define future priorities in climate modeling, and has developed computer climate models that are used globally. She has published more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. She earned a bachelor's degree in physics and statistics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and a master's degree and a doctorate in atmospheric science from Texas A&M University. Johannes Lercher is a chemist and holds a joint appointment at PNNL and the Technische Universität München in Germany. At PNNL, he serves as the director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis, and at TUM he is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and holds the chair of the Institute for Technische Chemie. He was elected based on his catalysis research, which focuses on the details of how catalysts work at the elementary level and using that insight to design and build better catalysts for industrial applications, including cleaner fossil fuels and renewable, biology-based fuels. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed journal articles, is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Catalysis and was previously elected to the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Academia Europaea and the European Academy of Sciences. He has won numerous awards, including the David Trim and Noel Cant Lectureship given by the Catalysis Society of Australia, the Eni Award for energy research, and the Francois Gault lectureship of the European Association of Catalysis Societies. He earned undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as a doctorate in chemistry from the Technische Universität Wien, Austria. The newly elected class brings the NAE's total U.S. membership to 2,281 and the number of foreign members to 249. Lercher and Leung will be inducted at a ceremony in Washington, DC in October. Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science. Founded in 1965, PNNL employs 4,400 staff and has an annual budget of nearly $1 billion. It is managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. As the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, the Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information on PNNL, visit the PNNL News Center, or follow PNNL on Facebook, Google+, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia - Dec. 13, 2016: Jean-Marie Basset, a distinguished professor of chemical science and director of the Catalysis Center at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) has been named a Fellow of the US National Academy of Inventors (NAI). "Election to NAI Fellow status attests to the innovation and impact of Dr. Basset's discoveries," said KAUST President Jean-Lou Chameau. "This is a well-deserved honor for Dr. Basset, who continues to make outstanding contributions to chemistry in academia and industry." The NAI Fellow program is the highest professional recognition accorded solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Basset, who has over 50 patents and has authored more than 500 scientific papers and reports, works to evidence the possible relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. For that purpose, he developed "Surface Organometallic Chemistry", a new field of chemistry that has resulted in the discovery of a number of new catalytic reactions. Basset holds various professional memberships to societies such as the European Academy of Sciences and Arts, Academia Europaea, French Academy of Technologies, and French Academy of Sciences. He is the recipient of several national and international awards: the Chevalier dans l'Ordre National du Mérite, the Max Planck Research Award, the Grand Prix de la Société Française de Chimie, the Distinguished Achievements Award of IMPI, and the Augustine Award of the ORCS, to name a few. Basset joins the ranks of two other KAUST faculty, 2015 NAI fellows Charlotte Hauser, professor of bioscience, and Jean Fréchet, distinguished professor of chemical science and vice president for research. With the election of the 2016 class there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows will be inducted on April 6, 2017, as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors in Boston, MA. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) is an international, graduate-level research university located on the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia. The University is dedicated to advancing science and technology through interdisciplinary research, education and innovation. Goal-oriented and curiosity-driven research is conducted by students, faculty, scientists and engineers to address the world's pressing scientific and technological challenges related to water, food, energy and the environment. KAUST seeks to contribute to the transformation of Saudi Arabia to a knowledge-based economy, promoting economic development and achieving the widest public benefit. http://www. The National Academy of Inventors is a 501(c)(3) non-profit member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 3,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 240 institutions, and growing rapidly. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. http://www.


News Article | September 28, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory are all excited over a new discovery that they say could usher in the next generation of ultra-efficient electronic devices, batteries, and power grids. The key to the whole thing is a class of materials called cuprates, which can act as superconductors without requiring the super-cold temperatures that superconductors normally need. Health researchers have been casting a stinkeye on the habit of sitting with a hot laptop on your lap, so if the new Brookhaven research only gets that far it will make a huge difference. Superconductors don’t waste energy in the form of heat. The problem with the current crop of superconductors is that they require chilling, which adds weight, bulk and expense. As described by the Brookhaven team, if you could engineer a superconductor that can operate at room temperature, you’re golden: Picture power grids that never lose energy, more affordable mag-lev train systems, cheaper medical imaging machines like MRI scanners, and smaller yet powerful supercomputers. Conventional superconductors are efficient because they allow an electrical current to pass through without hitting any “roadblocks.” The challenge is replicate that phenomenon at room temperature using relatively inexpensive materials. To solve that problem, the Brookhaven team latched onto cuprates, a class of compounds characterized by layers of copper and oxygen atoms. When doctored with strontium and certain other elements, cuprates act as superconductors but they don’t require the extra-cold environment that other superconductors need: What makes cuprates so special is that they can achieve this “magical” state of matter at temperatures a hundred degrees or more above those required by standard superconductors. That makes them very promising for real-world, energy-saving applications. So, if you can figure out exactly how cuprates become superconductors, you’re one step closer to a room temperature superconductor. The new Brookhaven research stands the traditional understanding of superconductors on its head.  According to conventional theory, the temperature of the material is controlled by the strength of the interaction between pairs of electrons. The research team concluded that density, not strength, controls the temperature: In other words, it’s not the forces between objects that matter here, but the density of objects — in this case, electron pairs. Actually, it took a decade of work by lead researcher Ivan Bozovic and his team to get to that one-line summary. Here’s the rundown by Brookhaven science writer Ariana Tantillo: After 10 years of preparing and analyzing more than 2,000 samples of a cuprate with varying amounts of strontium, they found that the number of electron pairs within a given area (say, per cubic centimeter), or the density of electron pairs, controls the superconducting transition temperature. Our friends over at Science Daily add some details on the methodology: Bozovic and his research team grew their more than 2,500 LSCO samples by using a custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy system that places single atoms onto a substrate, layer by layer. This system is equipped with advanced surface-science tools, such as those for absorption spectroscopy and electron diffraction, that provide real-time information about the surface morphology, thickness, chemical composition, and crystal structure of the resulting thin films. Epitaxy refers to layering crystals onto a crystal base, btw. The award-winning system was actually developed by Bozovic and his team. The next step is to figure out why the electrons pair up to begin with, so stay tuned for that, however long it takes. Didn’t US Senator and former presidential candidate Ted Cruz (R-Texas) once famously say he would abolish the Energy Department, if elected? Yes, he did, and it appears that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is headed down the same track. Earlier this month, reports surfaced that Trump would give the old heave-ho to the Energy Department, among others. In that case, it would be bye-bye Brookhaven and all of the other laboratories under the Energy Department umbrella. Fortunately, the national laboratory system is still intact — for now — so US taxpayers (disclosure: that includes me) can go ahead and give themselves a nice group hug for supporting Brookhaven, Bozovic, and his research team. In 2014, Bozovic’s record of achievement garnered him a spot among the 2,800 members of Academia Europea, the European Academy of Humanities, Letters, and Sciences. That’s this: Among the members are fifty-two Nobel Laureates, several of whom were elected to the Academia before they received that prestigious prize. Invitations are made only after nomination by existing members followed by an extensive peer review to scrutinize and confirm each individual’s scholarship and eminence in their chosen field. Here’s a little more on Bozovic’s record: His research results have been published in more than 200 highly cited research papers, many in the highest-impact journals such as Nature, Science, and Nature Materials. Bozovic is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics, and a Foreign Member of Serbian Academy of Science and Arts. Aside from pumping high-risk foundational research into the national economy, the Energy Department also directly supports the private sector through funding for startups (the SunShot Catalyst program is one good example) as well as loan guarantees for the big players. In one recent example, last summer the Energy Department announced $4.5 million in loan guarantees for Ford, GM, Nissan, Tesla and other stakeholders to expand the nation’s EV charging infrastructure. The goal is to enable “coast-to-coast, nationwide zero emissions travel” by 2020. Follow me on Twitter and Google+. Image: “This composite image offers a glimpse inside the custom system Brookhaven scientists used to create samples of materials that may pave the way for high-temperature superconductors” courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


BEERSE, Belgique, le 25 novembre 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Janssen-Cilag International NV (Janssen) a annoncé aujourd'hui la soumission d'une demande d'autorisation de mise sur le marché à l'Agence européenne des médicaments (AEM), afin de solliciter l'agrément du guselkumab pour le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère. Le guselkumab est un anticorps monoclonal humain qui cible la protéine interleukine (IL)-23, dont il a été montré qu'elle joue un rôle essentiel dans le développement des maladies inflammatoires à médiation immunitaire.1 Le psoriasis est une maladie inflammatoire chronique auto-immune qui se traduit par une surproduction de cellules cutanées et se caractérise par des lésions, ou plaques, rouges, surélevées, enflammées, squameuses, qui peuvent provoquer des démangeaisons, un sentiment d'inconfort et des douleurs.2 L'on estime que quelque 14 millions d'Européens sont atteints de psioriasis3, allant d'une forme modérée à sévère et invalidante, et peut souvent altérer la qualité de vie.4 « Nous nous efforçons de découvrir et développer des thérapies novatrices pour répondre aux besoins médicaux continus non satisfaits des personnes qui vivent avec le psoriasis », a déclaré Newman Yeilding, MD, directeur du développement de l'immunologie chez Janssen Research & Development, LLC. « Nous nous réjouissons à l'idée de travailler avec l'AME lors de l'examen de la demande par l'Agence, alors que nous sollicitons l'agrément du guselkumab pour le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère dans l'Union européenne. » Les données de quatre études évaluant l'efficacité et l'innocuité du guselkumab administré par injection sous-cutanée dans le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère ont servi de base pour la demande : les études de phase 3 VOYAGE 15 , VOYAGE 26 et NAVIGATE7, ainsi que l'étude de phase 2 X-PLORE8 , qui ont paru dans The New England Journal of Medicine au mois de juillet 2015. Les résultats de l'étude VOYAGE 1 ont récemment été présentés lors du congrès de l'European Academy of Dermatology et Venereology (EADV), et les résultats des études VOYAGE 2 et NAVIGATE devraient être présentées lors de prochains congrès scientifiques. Le guselkumab est un anticorps monoclonal humain avec un mécanisme d'action novateur qui cible la protéine interleukine (IL)-23 et est en développement de phase 3 sous forme de thérapie administrée par voie sous-cutanée pour le traitement du psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère. Le 17 novembre, Janssen Biotech, Inc. a annoncé la soumission d'une demande de licence de produit biologique auprès de la Food and Drug Administration aux États-Unis sollicitant l'agrément du guselkumab pour le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère. En outre, les résultats d'une étude de phase 2 évaluant le guselkumab dans le traitement des patients atteints de rhumatismes psoriasiques actifs ont récemment été présentés lors de la réunion de l'American College of Rheumatology et un programme de phase 3 pour cette indication est prévu. Le psoriasis est une maladie inflammatoire chronique auto-immune qui se traduit par une surproduction de cellules cutanées et se caractérise par des lésions, ou plaques, rouges, surélevées, enflammées, squameuses, qui peuvent provoquer des démangeaisons et des douleurs physiques.2 L'on estime que quelque 125 millions de personnes dans le monde sont atteintes de psioriasis9, dont 14 millions d'Européens3, et environ 20 % des personnes affectées ont des cas considérés comme modérés à sévères.10 À propos des sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen de Johnson & Johnson Dans les sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen de Johnson & Johnson, nous travaillons pour créer un monde sans maladies. Transformer la vie en trouvant de nouvelles et meilleures façons de prévenir, intercepter, traiter et soigner les maladies nous inspire. Nous réunissons les meilleurs cerveaux et explorons la science la plus prometteuse. Nous sommes Janssen. Nous collaborons avec le monde entier pour la santé de chacun en son sein. En savoir plus sur www.janssen.com/emea. Suivez-nous sur Twitter.com/JanssenEMEA. Janssen-Cilag International NV, Janssen Research & Development, LLC et Janssen Biotech, Inc. font partie des sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen de Johnson & Johnson. Le présent communiqué de presse contient des « énoncés prospectifs » au sens de la loi Private Securities Litigation Reform Act de 1995, concernant le développement de nouveaux produits. Il est conseillé au lecteur de ne pas se fier outre mesure à ces énoncés prospectifs. Ces énoncés sont fondés sur les attentes actuelles concernant des événements futurs. Si les hypothèses sous-jacentes s'avèrent inexactes ou si des risques ou incertitudes connus ou inconnus se matérialisent, les résultats réels peuvent différer sensiblement des attentes et projections de Janssen-Cilag International NV, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Janssen Biotech, Inc. et/ou Johnson & Johnson. Les risques et incertitudes incluent, sans toutefois s'y limiter : les défis et incertitudes inhérents à la recherche et au développement de produits, et notamment l'incertitude concernant le succès clinique et l'obtention des autorisations réglementaires ; l'incertitude concernant la réussite commerciale ; la concurrence, et notamment les avancées technologiques, les nouveaux produits et brevets obtenus par nos concurrents ; la contestation de brevets ; les difficultés et retards en matière de fabrication ; les préoccupations relatives à l'efficacité et à l'innocuité des produits entraînant des rappels de produits ou des mesures réglementaires ; les modifications des lois et réglementations applicables, et notamment les réformes en matière de soins de santé à l'échelle mondiale ; et les tendances à la maîtrise des coûts des soins de santé. Une liste et une description plus complètes de ces risques, incertitudes et autres facteurs peuvent être trouvées dans le rapport annuel de Johnson & Johnson sur le formulaire 10-K pour l'exercice clos au 3 janvier 2016, y compris dans le document 99 joint à ce rapport, et dans les documents déposés ultérieurement par la société auprès de la Securities and Exchange Commission. Des copies de ces documents sont disponibles en ligne à www.sec.gov, www.jnj.com, ou sur demande auprès de Johnson & Johnson. Aucune des sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen ou Johnson & Johnson ne s'engage à mettre à jour des énoncés prospectifs, que ce soit en raison de nouveaux renseignements, d'événements ou développements futurs.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

On Friday, The Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) honors Danish Professor Bo Barker Jørgensen with the prestigious 2017 A.C. Redfield Award at the Aquatic Sciences Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii 26 February - 03 March, 2017. Dr. Bo Barker Jørgensen receives the prize for his lifelong and groundbreaking work advancing our understanding of marine sediment microbial ecology and biogeochemistry. His work has ranged from surface sediments to the deep biosphere, several kilometers into the seabed. ASLO is an international aquatic science society founded in 1948. For more information about ASLO, please visit their website: http://www. . In their press release, ASLO writes, "Bo Barker Jørgensen has led the way in advancing our understanding of the biogeochemistry and microbial ecology of marine sediments. His papers have been cited more than 32,000 times, with two of his papers having over one thousand citations each. Colleagues say these statistics are evidence of Jørgensen's "jaw dropping" influence on science and a tribute to the huge impact of his lifelong work." ASLO also highlights Bo Barker Jørgensen's early research on the sulfur cycle in marine sediments presented in a paper in 1977. The method he developed for determining the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction in marine sediments is still in use today and his paper is of one of the most highly cited papers in marine sediment biogeochemistry. Another highlight in a long and illustrious science career is the work of Bo Barker Jørgensen and then graduate student, Niels Peter Revsbech who is now a professor and colleague at Aarhus University, Denmark. During the late 70's and early 80's they used oxygen microelectrodes for the first time to measure the distribution of oxygen in sediments, "...shocking the scientific community with their discovery that oxygen penetrates only a few millimeters into coastal sediments. Their introduction of microelectrodes revolutionized our understanding of the distribution and dynamics of oxygen and oxidants in marine sediments," ASLO writes in their nomination. Bo Barker Jørgensen is famous not only for developing techniques, instruments and publishing influential papers, but the A. C. Redfield award also recognizes his work achievements as a mentor. Many of the young scientists he advised have established successful scientific careers of their own. "The list of students, postdoctoral fellows and colleagues who have been mentored by Jørgensen reads like a virtual 'who's who' of marine microbiology," the nomination reads. Bo Barker Jørgensen's vision for microbial research is credited by colleagues as central for the establishment of Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany. Bo Barker Jørgensen served as director of the Institute from 1992-2011, and helped to establish it as a world leader in research on marine microbes. In 2007, Bo Barker Jørgensen established the Center for Geomicrobiology in Aarhus, where he has built an international team of leading scientists focused on sediments in the deep biosphere. "He and his team are 'providing fundamental and new insights into the nature of what may be the largest, yet least known, biosphere on Earth,'" it is written in the nomination. Contact: Bo Barker Jørgensen is at the moment in Hawaii but can be reached on mail: bo.barker@bios.au.dk The ASLO Lifetime Achievement award is given to those that have excelled in limnologic and oceanographic research, education, service to the community and society throughout a lifetimes work. The prize was first presented in 1994 and has since 2004 been named after Alfred Clarence Redfield, an American oceanographer whose major discovery was the atomic ratio between nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon found in marine plankton (phytoplankton), also known as the Redfield ratio. Dr. Jørgensen is Professor and Head of the Center for Geomicrobiology at Aarhus University in Denmark. In his long career, Bo Barker Jørgensen has received numerous prizes and honors for his impressive work: Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, 2009 Fellow of the European Academy of Microbiology, 2009


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: en.prnasia.com

ATLANTA, Nov. 9, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- OneTrust, the leading privacy management software designed to help organizations comply with global data privacy regulations and Privacy by Design, together with IAPP, the world's largest association of privacy professionals, announce the launch of the EU Data Transfer Kit, free for IAPP members. The IAPP and OneTrust have partnered to provide a complimentary online platform to help organizations assess their readiness to meet the requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Privacy Shield, and Binding Corporate Rules for Processors and Controllers (BCR). "With the invalidation of the Safe Harbor framework, replaced by the new Privacy Shield, and the looming GDPR, our members, and organizations around the world, face a challenging environment for transferring personal data out of the EU," said IAPP President and CEO J. Trevor Hughes, CIPP. "They need tools like the new IAPP-OneTrust EU Data Transfer Kit to help them identify gaps and create organizational awareness. Built with insight from our members, this new tool is a great example of the IAPP community working together to help each other meet whatever privacy and data protection challenges are presented by an ever-changing regulatory environment." The EU Data Transfer Kit helps the privacy office prepare for GDPR, Privacy Shield, and BCR in three steps: "Strong protections for the transfer of personal data globally is a foundational element of protecting the privacy of individuals. It is critical that organizations thoroughly evaluate their privacy programs against data transfer requirements," said Dr. Alexander Dix, OneTrust Board Advisor, and current Vice-Chair of the European Academy for Freedom of Information and Data Protection in Berlin.  "The new technology-based solution provided by the IAPP and OneTrust provides an innovative and efficient approach to helping organizations evaluate their readiness to meet the obligations of GDPR, Privacy Shield, and BCRs." The EU Data Transfer Kit is OneTrust's second complimentary product launched in partnership with the IAPP. In September, the IAPP and OneTrust launched a Comprehensive PIA platform. "Over 400 IAPP members have registered for the IAPP and OneTrust complimentary PIA Platform since the general availability less than two months ago," said OneTrust CEO Kabir Barday, CIPM, CIPP/US, CIPT. "The success of the PIA platform has made it clear there is tremendous demand for technology-based solutions that help privacy professionals automate and operationalize their compliance efforts. OneTrust is committed to offering the most comprehensive offerings to IAPP members, and today's launch of the EU Transfer Kit, is a proofpoint of OneTrust delivering on this commitment." To access the OneTrust EU Data Transfer Kit, exclusively for IAPP members, please visit: https://onetrust.com/IAPP-eu IAPP members will have access to OneTrust's globally available support team as well as training webinars, jointly hosted by IAPP and OneTrust. The OneTrust platform also enables IAPP members to request access to upgraded features including advanced privacy impact assessment automation, data mapping automation, cookie compliance, and privacy shield capabilities as their needs evolve, all within a single, comprehensive platform. – OneTrust is the leading privacy management software platform used by hundreds of organizations globally to comply with data privacy regulations across sectors and jurisdictions, including the EU GDPR and Privacy Shield. Our integrated technology-based solutions include privacy impact assessment automation, data mapping automation, website privacy monitoring, EU cookie compliance, and privacy shield certification. The OneTrust platform can be deployed in the cloud or on premise, and provides organizations with the flexibility to upgrade capabilities as their privacy program matures. OneTrust is based in Atlanta, GA and London, UK area, and is backed by the founders of Manhattan Associates (NASDAQ: MANH) and AirWatch ($1.54B acq by VMWare). Find us online at www.onetrust.com. – The International Association of Privacy Professionals is the world's largest association of privacy professionals with more than 25,000 members across 83 countries. The IAPP is a not-for-profit association that helps to define and support the privacy profession globally. More information about the IAPP is available at www.iapp.org.

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