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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

RICHLAND, Wash. - Two researchers at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been elected to membership in the prestigious National Academy of Engineering. Ruby Leung and Johannes Lercher are among the 106 new members elected worldwide to the 2017 class. The NAE is a private, independent, nonprofit institution that is part of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. NAE focuses on maintaining a strong engineering community and bringing together experts to provide independent advice to the federal government on engineering and technology challenges. Lercher and Leung join emeritus staff member Subhash Singhal, who is a National Academy of Sciences member, as PNNL researchers in the National Academies. "I am thrilled that the exceptional contributions of two of our researchers have been recognized by the National Academy of Engineering," said PNNL director Steven Ashby. "Membership in the NAE is among the highest honors that a researcher can achieve, and Ruby and Johannes are most deserving. Congratulations to both of them!" Ruby Leung is an atmospheric scientist at PNNL and also an affiliate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. She was elected based on her leadership in regional and global computer modeling of the Earth's climate and water cycles. Leung's research has advanced understanding and modeling of the regional and global water cycles, with implications for managing water, agriculture and energy. She has organized key workshops sponsored by environmental agencies, served on panels that define future priorities in climate modeling, and has developed computer climate models that are used globally. She has published more than 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. She earned a bachelor's degree in physics and statistics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and a master's degree and a doctorate in atmospheric science from Texas A&M University. Johannes Lercher is a chemist and holds a joint appointment at PNNL and the Technische Universität München in Germany. At PNNL, he serves as the director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis, and at TUM he is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and holds the chair of the Institute for Technische Chemie. He was elected based on his catalysis research, which focuses on the details of how catalysts work at the elementary level and using that insight to design and build better catalysts for industrial applications, including cleaner fossil fuels and renewable, biology-based fuels. He has published more than 500 peer-reviewed journal articles, is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Catalysis and was previously elected to the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Academia Europaea and the European Academy of Sciences. He has won numerous awards, including the David Trim and Noel Cant Lectureship given by the Catalysis Society of Australia, the Eni Award for energy research, and the Francois Gault lectureship of the European Association of Catalysis Societies. He earned undergraduate and graduate degrees, as well as a doctorate in chemistry from the Technische Universität Wien, Austria. The newly elected class brings the NAE's total U.S. membership to 2,281 and the number of foreign members to 249. Lercher and Leung will be inducted at a ceremony in Washington, DC in October. Interdisciplinary teams at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory address many of America's most pressing issues in energy, the environment and national security through advances in basic and applied science. Founded in 1965, PNNL employs 4,400 staff and has an annual budget of nearly $1 billion. It is managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. As the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, the Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information on PNNL, visit the PNNL News Center, or follow PNNL on Facebook, Google+, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.


"Innovations in theoretical and computational chemistry underpin our understanding of biological interactions, chemical dynamics and structure, as well as many beneficial chemical technologies. Michele Parrinello is a giant in the field, whose innovations are widely used in chemistry, biology, materials science, and engineering," stated Matthew Tirrell, Chair of the Dreyfus Foundation Scientific Affairs Committee and Founding Pritzker Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. The impact of Parrinello's work is such that he is one of the most cited scientists in the present day. He is renowned for co-devising the Car–Parrinello method for computer simulation of the movements of atoms and molecules. This work brought together, for the first time, the classical approach of molecular dynamics with a quantum theoretical approach for electron densities. This enabled the realistic exploration of a wide range of physical situations. Prior to this Parrinello had become distinguished for developing the Parrinello–Rahman method to study phase transitions in crystals. More recently, he has developed what is called metadynamics and subsequently announced an efficient variational sampling process. This has allowed the calculation of complicated phenomena such as protein folding, crystallization from a liquid, or the binding of drugs to protein receptors. Henry C. Walter, President of the Dreyfus Foundation, said, "Michele Parrinello's contributions to chemistry are immense. The Dreyfus Foundation is proud to honor him with the Dreyfus Prize, and as the first recipient from outside the United States." "I am overjoyed and humbled by the honor," said Parrinello. "I would like to dedicate this prize to my mentor Anees Rahman, the founder of modern atomistic molecular dynamics, a superb scientist, and a great human being. It was my good fortune to have met him as well as the very many talented colleagues and students with whom I had the pleasure to collaborate." Born in Messina, Italy, Parrinello received his Italian Laurea in physics from the University of Bologna in 1968. He has received many international honors including the Dirac Medal, the Rahman Prize, the Hewlett-Packard Europhysics Prize (all with Roberto Car), the Schroedinger Medal, the Enrico Fermi Prize, and the American Chemical Society Award in Theoretical Chemistry. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, Socio corrispondente of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (Italy), and a Member of the Royal Society (UK), the European Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and others. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation (www.dreyfus.org), based in New York, is a leading non-profit organization devoted to the advancement of the chemical sciences. It was established in 1946 by chemist, inventor, and businessman Camille Dreyfus, who directed that the Foundation's purpose be "to advance the science of chemistry, chemical engineering, and related sciences as a means of improving human relations and circumstances throughout the world." In broad terms, the Foundation programs advance young faculty of early accomplishment, develop leadership in environmental chemistry, and fund lectureships at primarily undergraduate institutions. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/michele-parrinello-wins-the-dreyfus-prize-for-advances-in-theoretical-and-computational-chemistry-300456587.html


The BLA filing for tildrakizumab with the U.S. FDA is based on two pivotal Phase III trials (reSURFACE 1 and 2) which included over 1,800 patients across more than 200 clinical trial sites, including some patients who have been treated with tildrakizumab for up to three and a half years. Data from these trials were most recently presented at the 2017 American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Annual Meeting in March and previously presented at the 25th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress. Future presentations and publications of the reSURFACE Phase-3 pivotal trials will include more scientific insights on the data to week 52 and beyond. The clinical trials are designed to evaluate safety and efficacy for up to five years, and to date, some clinical trial participants have been treated with tildrakizumab for up to three and half years. About Psoriasis Psoriasis is a chronic immune disease that appears on the skin. It affects an estimated 7.5 million people in the U.S. and approximately 125 million people worldwide1. It is a non-contagious disorder that speeds the growth cycle of skin cells1 and results in thick scaly areas of skin2. The most common form of psoriasis, called plaque psoriasis, appears as red, raised areas of skin covered with flaky white scales, which may be itchy and painful and can crack and bleed2. Despite existing treatment options, many people with plaque psoriasis continue to struggle with the ongoing, persistent nature of this chronic disease. About Tildrakizumab Tildrakizumab is an investigational humanized, anti-IL-23p19 monoclonal antibody designed to selectively block the cytokine IL-23. With this precise targeting, tildrakizumab has the potential to help control the pathogenic cells responsible for the inflammatory process of psoriasis with limited impact on the rest of the immune system. Phase-3 tildrakizumab data provide further evidence for the role of the IL-23 pathway in helping to control the inflammatory process of psoriasis. About Tildrakizumab Phase-3 reSURFACE Trial Design Tildrakizumab Phase-3 studies (reSURFACE 1 and 2) are randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, three-part studies designed to demonstrate efficacy of tildrakizumab in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis compared to placebo and comparative drug and to assess safety and tolerability. Part one of the studies randomized patients into three or four treatment arms, including tildrakizumab 200mg, tildrakizumab 100mg, placebo and etanercept (reSURFACE 2 only). After Week 12 patients on placebo and etanercept were then re-randomized into tildrakizumab 200mg and 100mg treatment arms to proceed into part two of the studies. Finally, in part three of the studies, responders (PASI ≥75) and partial responders (PASI ≥50 and PASI <75) were re-randomized after Week 28 continue the same treatment, a different dose of tildrakizumab or placebo. The co-primary efficacy endpoint of the two placebo controlled studies were the proportion of patients with Psoriasis Area Sensitivity Index 75 (PASI 75) response at week 12 compared to placebo and the proportion of participants with a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of clear or minimal with at least a 2 grade reduction from baseline at week 12 compared to placebo. The reSURFACE 2 also included a key secondary endpoint comparing tildrakizumab and etanercept on PASI 75 and PGA. Other co-secondary endpoint of both placebo controlled studies included PASI 90 and PASI 100 responses at week 12 and PASI 75, 90 and 100 and PGA responses from baseline at Week 28. PGA measures lesion thickness, erythema and scaling across all of a patient's psoriasis lesions in order to determine the disease activity on a six-point scale from "clear" to "severe." A PASI score is a measure of psoriatic plaque redness, scaling and thickness and extent of the involvement in each region of the body. Treatment efficacy is often measured by reduction of PASI from baseline (i.e. 75 percent reduction is known PASI 75), a 90 percent reduction is known as PASI 90 and PASI 100 is total clearance of skin disease. About Sun Dermatology Sun Pharma is committed to expanding our dermatology portfolio to bring healthcare providers and patients around the world more treatment options and ongoing support for conditions with high unmet medical needs like psoriasis. Sun Pharma, along with its subsidiaries, is ranked fourth in dermatology prescription volume within the U.S. per IMS and is fifth largest specialty generic pharmaceutical company globally. In addition to the investigational candidate tildrakizumab, an investigational anti-IL- 23p19 monoclonal antibody, Sun Dermatology is comprised of several branded products indicated for the treatment of acne and actinic keratosis with a focus on other dermatologic conditions with unmet needs such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. For further information, please visit www.sunpharmaderm.com About Sun Pharma, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA, Agreement Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.'s wholly owned subsidiary acquired worldwide rights to tildrakizumab from Merck (through a Merck subsidiary), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, in 2014. Funded by a Sun Pharma subsidiary, Merck is responsible for the completion of Phase- 3 trials in patients with mild-to-moderate plaque psoriasis and, as appropriate, submission of a Biologics License Application to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Merck is also responsible for manufacturing finished goods to support Sun Pharma's initial product launch. Post-approval in the U.S., Sun Pharma will be responsible for all other regulatory activities, including subsequent submissions, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of the approved product. Sun Pharma will also be responsible for all regulatory, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of approved products for all non-U.S. markets. Merck is eligible to receive milestone payments and royalties on sales of tildrakizumab. The agreement between Sun Pharma and Almirall remains subject to the exclusive license agreement between Sun Pharma and Merck. About Sun Pharma, Almirall S.A, Europe, Agreement Sun Pharma and its wholly owned subsidiary and Almirall (Spanish Stock Exchange ticker: ALM) closed on July 2016 a licensing agreement on the development and commercialization of tildrakizumab for psoriasis in Europe. Under terms of the license agreement, Almirall is able to lead European studies, and participate in larger Global clinical studies for psoriasis indication subject to the terms of the Sun Pharma – Merck agreements, as well as certain cost sharing agreements. Sun Pharma will be eligible to receive development and regulatory milestone payments and, additionally, sales milestone payments and royalties on net sales. Sun Pharma will continue to lead development of tildrakizumab for other indications, where Almirall will have right of first negotiation for certain indications in Europe. The agreement between Sun Pharma and Almirall remains subject to the exclusive license agreement between Sun Pharma and Merck. Disclaimer: Statements in this "Document" describing the Company's objectives, projections, estimates, expectations, plans or predictions or industry conditions or events may be "forward looking statements" within the meaning of applicable securities laws and regulations. Actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those expressed or implied. Sun Pharma is the world's fourth largest specialty generic pharmaceutical company and India's top pharmaceutical company. A vertically integrated business, economies of scale and an extremely skilled team enable us to deliver quality products in a timely manner at affordable prices. It provides high-quality, affordable medicines trusted by customers and patients in over 150 countries across the world. Sun Pharma's global presence is supported by 49 manufacturing facilities spread across 6 continents, R&D centres across the globe and a multi-cultural workforce comprising over 50 nationalities. The consolidated revenues for 12 months ending March 2016 are approximately US$ 4.3 billion, of which US contributes US$ 2.1 billion. In India, the company enjoys leadership across 12 different classes of doctors with 31 brands featuring amongst top 300 pharmaceutical brands in India. Its footprint across emerging markets covers over 100 markets and 6 markets in Western Europe. Its Global Consumer Healthcare business is ranked amongst Top 10 across 4 global markets. Its API business footprint is strengthened through 14 world class API manufacturing facilities across the globe. Sun Pharma fosters excellence through innovation supported by strong R&D capabilities comprising about 2,000 scientists and R&D investments of over 8% of annual revenues. For further information please visit www.sunpharma.com & follow us on Twitter @SunPharma_Live To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sun-pharma-announces-us-fda-filing-acceptance-of-biologics-license-application-bla-for-tildrakizumab-300463108.html


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.fastcompany.com

ISIS has claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing that killed at least 22 people, including children, and wounded nearly 50 others at an Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena in England on Monday night. It’s the latest attack in a string of tragedies perpetrated by the Islamic extremist group, which has staged more than 140 attacks in 29 countries, killing at least 2,000 people, since it became active in 2014 . In less than 24 hours, however, Britain’s local Muslim community had issued its own response, one that among Muslims, in particular, has become an increasingly popular way to express their support of communities affected by a group that’s obviously not representative of the values and religion they hold dear. A campaign entitled “Muslims United for Manchester” appeared on LaunchGood, a crowdfunding site that works like a blend of both Kickstarter and GoFundMe. The service allows anyone to raise money for both projects and cause work that empowers Muslims in need, and for the Muslim community to return the favor, promoting their own fundraising efforts to improve or support some broader social good. To that end, “Muslims United for Manchester” seeks to raise at least $65,000 in short-term aid for the arena-bombing victims and their families (they’ve since lowered their initial goal to about $13,000). The campaign is led by the British Muslim Heritage Center, with support from a coalition of national Muslim rights and culture organizations including Forum For Change, The Federation of Student Islamic Societies, the Islamic Society of Britain, European Academy of Quranic Studies, and the Altrincham Muslim Association. “We wish to respond to evil with good, as our faith instructs us, and send a powerful message of compassion through action,” reads the fundraising description, which includes a positive faith-based message: “Our Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, said: “Have mercy to those on earth, and the One in the Heavens (God) will have mercy upon you.” And the Quran teaches to “Repel evil by that which is better” (41:34).” (As Fast Company has reported, distributing funds in situations like this is incredibly tricky, but the group will likely consult with in-country crisis experts for how best and on what timeline to distribute those funds.) Obviously, such campaigns only work if they go viral. But in this case, the pathway that this campaign travels in doing so may be equally important. As part of their mission statement, the creators are asking for like-minded Muslims, mosques, imams, and community leaders to “endorse and promote” the message, providing a front of support, the sort of outpouring that makes it clear just how much ISIS’s views are universally rejected. “What we did with LaunchGood this morning was weld together a coalition of local actors, which is quite powerful,” says Muddassar Ahmed, who heads a UK-based public relations firm that works closely with the United Nations and U.S. State Department, and serves as a UK governmental advisor on Muslim communities. To do so, Ahmed connected many of those groups directly with LaunchGood, which helped shape the message. After all, he set up a similar campaign, “Muslims United For London,” in March, after an ISIS-inspired driver intentionally plowed through a crowd of people on the Westminster Bridge, killing at least four people and wounding more than 40, including the fatal stabbing of a police officer at the Houses of Parliament. During the attack, Ahmed was barricaded in one of the government buildings. The campaign raised roughly $38,000 from 1,200 supporters, although the service itself has had many larger successes. “I think their ability to [reach across] Muslim communities is a unique value add, particularly when it’s Muslim organizations that are involved doing the work,” Ahmed says. LaunchGood was cofounded in Detroit in 2011 by Chris Blauvelt, Omar Hamid, and Amany Killawi, three Muslim entrepreneurs who groomed the company through a local incubator program called Bizdom. The site officially launched in October 2013, and now has an predominantly Muslim team of roughly 20 people in five countries.


Fortuna Fix Inc. (“Fortuna”), a private, clinical-stage biotech company, is aiming to be the first to eliminate the need for embryonic and fetal stem cells by using direct reprogramming of autologous cells to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Fortuna announced today the launch of its Scientific Advisory Board (“SAB”) with Professor Michael Fehlings, MD, PhD; Father Kevin FitzGerald, S.J., PhD; Col. (R) Dallas Hack, MD, MPH; and Professor James Giordano, PhD. “We are excited and honored to have these world-leading experts join our SAB,” says CEO Jan-Eric Ahlfors. “We look forward to working with them to bring our novel regenerative medicine solutions to patients suffering from neurotrauma and neurodegeneration.” Fortuna’s two flagship technologies — autologous directly reprogrammed neural precursor cells (“drNPC”) and Regeneration Matrix (“RMx™”) — are poised to lead a revolution in neuro-regeneration. For the first time, patients suffering from neurotrauma or neurodegeneration will be able to get treated with autologous neural stem cells produced by direct reprogramming (i.e. starting with and only using the patient’s own cells, bypassing use of pluripotent stem cells and avoiding harvesting and use of human embryos or fetuses). The method of direct reprogramming developed by Fortuna relies on an ethical, rapid, high throughput, low cost and fully automated manufacturing process. As drNPC do not involve any genetic engineering, pluripotent stem cells, or use of immune-suppression, it provides patients with personalized stem cells that are also expected to have a greater safety profile. In addition, drNPC are expected to replace dead neural cells, something that no other current technology can do effectively. RMx™ is a unique and highly efficient bio-scaffold for the promotion of neural tissue regrowth. “Our testing of drNPC at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre of the University Health Network in various Spinal Cord Injury (“SCI”) animal models to characterize their regenerative capacity and safety profile indicates that drNPC are a promising source of therapeutic stem cells with potential for tissue preservation and functional improvement after SCI. I am highly encouraged by the reprogramming efficiency of drNPC and look forward to leading the clinical development of drNPC for SCI," says Professor Fehlings, after working on the drNPC in his lab for two years. Dr. Hack further remarks: “Fortuna’s autologous drNPC represent a major advance in cell therapy for treatment of CNS injury and degeneration. For the first time, neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes — the three type of cells of the brain and spinal cord — can be repaired and replaced where these cells have died or been destroyed due to trauma or neurodegenerative disease. Fortuna’s proprietary automated manufacturing addresses a key hurdle of personalized cell therapy, making drNPC commercially viable both at small and large scale” “Stem cell therapeutics have been plagued with controversy and hype, raising ethical and political issues that have resulted in a relatively hostile funding environment for research and development in the field. I am excited to work alongside Fortuna to help advance development of their ethical and commercially viable platform for cell therapeutics to benefit patients, their families, and our entire society,” says Father FitzGerald. The SAB members encompass unique expertise in key areas of importance for the company: Dr. Michael Fehlings is a world-renowned Neurosurgeon focusing on Spinal Cord Injury and a leader in the field of stem cell therapeutics for SCI. Dr. Fehlings is the Vice Chair of Research for the Department of Surgery, Co-Director of the Spine Program and a Professor of Neurosurgery at the University of Toronto. He is well known for his work on early decompressive surgery, which demonstrated significant improvement on neurological and functional outcomes after SCI that had an important impact on how spinal trauma is managed today. Recently, during the Henry Farfan Award ceremony (2013), he was described as the “single most influential active spinal cord injury researcher and clinician in the world.” Dr. Fehlings is also the recipient of the coveted Olivecrona Award from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden (known as the "Nobel Prize of Neuroscience"). Dr. Fehlings has been an integral part of the work performed by independent validators sponsored by CIHR (Canadian Institutes of Health Research) on Fortuna’s technology. Dr. Fehlings’ work was presented at the annual International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) conference in June 2016 in San Francisco with a follow up to be presented at the ISSCR in June 2017 in Boston. Father Kevin FitzGerald is a Professor at Georgetown University and advisor to the Vatican on Bioethics (including human genetic engineering, cloning, stem cell research, and personalized medicine). Father FitzGerald is the Dr. David Lauler Chair of Catholic Health Care Ethics in the Center for Clinical Bioethics at Georgetown University, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Oncology at the Georgetown University Medical Center. He is a founding member of Do No Harm, a member of the ethics committee for the March of Dimes, a member of the Genetic Alliance IRB, and a member of the Georgetown-MedStar Hospital Ethics Committee. Father FitzGerald has been a Corresponding Member of the Pontifical Academy of Life since 2005, and has been a Consultor to the Pontifical Council for Culture since 2014. He has a Ph.D. in molecular genetics, and a second Ph.D. in bioethics, from Georgetown University. His research efforts focus on the investigation of abnormal gene expression in cancer, and on ethical issues in biomedical research and medical genomics. Dr Dallas Hack, recently retired from the US military, is one of the leaders of military medicine of his time, with a particular focus on brain health (Traumatic Brain Injury (“TBI”) and concussion). He served as the Director of the US Army Combat Casualty Care Research Program and Chair of the Joint Program Committee for Combat Casualty Care from 2008 to 2014 and as the Senior Medical Advisor to the Principal Assistant for Research and Technology, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command from 2014 to 2015. He coordinated more than 70% of the Department of Defense trauma research to improve battlefield trauma care of those injured in combat at a time when the Department of Defense funded more TBI research than any other organization in the world because of the increasing awareness of the massive burden of TBI in the military. He has held numerous military medical leadership positions, including Chief of Clinical Services at Fort Knox, KY, Commander of the NATO Headquarters Healthcare Facility, and Command Surgeon at the strategic level during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. Col. (R) Dallas Hack has received numerous military awards, including the Bronze Star, two Legion of Merit awards, and seven Meritorious Service Medals and was inducted as a Distinguished Member of the Military Order of Medical Merit.  He has appointments from the School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh as Adjunct Professor of Neurosurgery, and from the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University as Associate Clinical Professor. Dr. James Giordano is Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Biochemistry, and Chief of the Neuroethics Studies Program at the Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics of Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC. Prof. Giordano has served as a member of the Neuroethics, Legal and Social Issues Advisory Panel of the Defense Advanced Research Projects’ Agency (DARPA), as a Senior Science Advisory Fellow of the Strategic Multilayer Assessment Branch of the Joint Staff of the Pentagon, is an appointed member of the Secretary of Health and Human Services Advisory Council for Human Research Protection, and is a Research Fellow of the European Union Human Brain Project. In recognition of his ongoing work, Prof. Giordano was elected to the European Academy of Science and Arts. Fortuna is a private, clinical-stage biotech company with a patented direct cell reprogramming technology platform together with a patented bio-scaffolding technology for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. The company is focused on clinical development of its platforms for a range of neurodegenerative diseases including SCI, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, TBI, and ALS. The company has developed a proprietary fully automated GMP manufacturing system for production of drNPC, initially to be used in clinical trials in Parkinson’s disease and Spinal Cord Injury.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK, February 21, 2017-- Susanne Ullman has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Dr. Ullman is a dermatologist and educator who has been excelling in her career since establishing herself professionally in 1974. Now a professor of dermatology for the Bispebjerg Hospital at the University of Copenhagen, she demonstrates an expertise in diseases of the skin. Previously, Dr. Ullman came to prominence as a professor of dermatology at Righospitalet at the University of Copenhagen and a visiting professor at the University of Minnesota. Other noteworthy roles held in her career include coordinator for education of dermatologists in Denmark, and visiting professor at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia and Hunan Medical University in China. In recognition of her professional excellence, she was selected for inclusion into Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare, Who's Who in Science and Engineering, and Who's Who in the World.Before establishing herself professionally, Dr. Ullman prepared for her career by investing in her education. She earned an MD from the University of Copenhagen in 1965, a specialty degree in dermatology in 1976 and a Doctor of Medical Sciences in 1988. To stay at the top of her field, Dr. Ullman is a member of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology and the American Academy of Dermatology. In addition, she has shared her insights and expertise through numerous articles to professional journals and she is still active in scientific projects.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | January 7, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

The famous Ötzi, a man murdered about 5,300 years ago in the Italian Alps, had what's now considered the world's oldest known case of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that can cause ulcers and gastric cancer, a new study finds. It's unclear whether the ancient iceman did, in fact, have ulcers or gastric cancer because his stomach tissue didn't survive. Today, about half of the world's human population has H. pylori in their gut, but only one in 10 people develop a condition from the bacteria, the researchers said. However, an analysis of tissues from Ötzi's gastrointestinal tract shows that his immune system had reacted to the potentially virulent strain, suggesting he might have felt ill from H. pylori symptoms on the day he died. [Mummy Melodrama: Top 9 Secrets About Otzi the Iceman] "We showed the presence of marker proteins which we see today in patients infected with Helicobacter," study lead author Frank Maixner, a microbiologist at the European Academy in Bozen/Bolzano in Italy, said in a statement. The researchers also analyzed the specific H. pylori strain that Ötzi carried. They found that, although it was unique, it was strikingly similar to a strain seen in ancient Asia but not to those in northern Africa as the researchers had suspected. Hikers discovered Ötzi's mummified body in a glacier in 1991, and his remains now reside at the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology in Bolzano, Italy. Studies on the Copper Age man suggest that Ötzi likely lived with aches and pains — during his lifetime, he had bad teeth and knees; a genetic predisposition to heart disease; lactose intolerance; arthritis; a possible case of Lyme disease; and wounds indicating that he suffered from an arrow injury and a blow to the head before he died at somewhere between 40 and 50 years old. Despite these maladies, Ötzi probably would have lived for another 10 to 20 years if he hadn't been murdered, study co-author Albert Zink, the head of the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman at the European Academy, said during a news conference yesterday (Jan. 6). The researchers were curious about whether Ötzi carried the ancient form of H. pylori, which research suggests has existed in humans for at least 100,000 years. But the new study was no easy undertaking. The scientists defrosted the heavily tattooed mummy and used an incision made by an earlier inspection of Ötzi to take tissue samples. The team extracted 12 biopsy samples from the stomach and intestine, and analyzed the genetic material from each. "We had to separate the Helicobacter pylori sequences from the other genetic material," which included the DNA from the iceman himself, food he had eaten, soil bacteria that invaded the body, and other material, study co-senior author Thomas Rattei, the head of the Division of Computational Systems Biology at the University of Vienna in Austria, said at the news conference. "This was like searching [for] a needle in the haystack." But they did find it. Moreover, Ötzi's H. pylori strain was heavily fragmented because of degradation, providing more evidence that it wasn't the result of modern contamination but rather the actual ancient strain that had infected him during the Copper Age, Rattei said. [Album: A New Face for Ötzi the Iceman Mummy] After sequencing the ancient H. pylori strain, the researchers compared it to other known strains of the pathogen. Interestingly, scientists can use H. pylori as a tool to study human migration. The human genome typically mutates slowly over time, but H. pylori mutates quickly. It changes so fast, in fact, that it's usually unique to each geographic population. What's more, if one group of people encounters another — by migrating to a new area, for instance — their H. pylori strains can mix, leaving genetic clues about the mixed strain's background. Furthermore, these H. pylori strains infect only humans, so it can't be carried by other animals, the researchers said. "That is why we studied Helicobacter pylori and why it's so important for illustrating all of these wonderful prehistoric human migrations," said co-senior author Yoshan Moodley, a professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of Venda in South Africa.


News Article | September 28, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory are all excited over a new discovery that they say could usher in the next generation of ultra-efficient electronic devices, batteries, and power grids. The key to the whole thing is a class of materials called cuprates, which can act as superconductors without requiring the super-cold temperatures that superconductors normally need. Health researchers have been casting a stinkeye on the habit of sitting with a hot laptop on your lap, so if the new Brookhaven research only gets that far it will make a huge difference. Superconductors don’t waste energy in the form of heat. The problem with the current crop of superconductors is that they require chilling, which adds weight, bulk and expense. As described by the Brookhaven team, if you could engineer a superconductor that can operate at room temperature, you’re golden: Picture power grids that never lose energy, more affordable mag-lev train systems, cheaper medical imaging machines like MRI scanners, and smaller yet powerful supercomputers. Conventional superconductors are efficient because they allow an electrical current to pass through without hitting any “roadblocks.” The challenge is replicate that phenomenon at room temperature using relatively inexpensive materials. To solve that problem, the Brookhaven team latched onto cuprates, a class of compounds characterized by layers of copper and oxygen atoms. When doctored with strontium and certain other elements, cuprates act as superconductors but they don’t require the extra-cold environment that other superconductors need: What makes cuprates so special is that they can achieve this “magical” state of matter at temperatures a hundred degrees or more above those required by standard superconductors. That makes them very promising for real-world, energy-saving applications. So, if you can figure out exactly how cuprates become superconductors, you’re one step closer to a room temperature superconductor. The new Brookhaven research stands the traditional understanding of superconductors on its head.  According to conventional theory, the temperature of the material is controlled by the strength of the interaction between pairs of electrons. The research team concluded that density, not strength, controls the temperature: In other words, it’s not the forces between objects that matter here, but the density of objects — in this case, electron pairs. Actually, it took a decade of work by lead researcher Ivan Bozovic and his team to get to that one-line summary. Here’s the rundown by Brookhaven science writer Ariana Tantillo: After 10 years of preparing and analyzing more than 2,000 samples of a cuprate with varying amounts of strontium, they found that the number of electron pairs within a given area (say, per cubic centimeter), or the density of electron pairs, controls the superconducting transition temperature. Our friends over at Science Daily add some details on the methodology: Bozovic and his research team grew their more than 2,500 LSCO samples by using a custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy system that places single atoms onto a substrate, layer by layer. This system is equipped with advanced surface-science tools, such as those for absorption spectroscopy and electron diffraction, that provide real-time information about the surface morphology, thickness, chemical composition, and crystal structure of the resulting thin films. Epitaxy refers to layering crystals onto a crystal base, btw. The award-winning system was actually developed by Bozovic and his team. The next step is to figure out why the electrons pair up to begin with, so stay tuned for that, however long it takes. Didn’t US Senator and former presidential candidate Ted Cruz (R-Texas) once famously say he would abolish the Energy Department, if elected? Yes, he did, and it appears that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is headed down the same track. Earlier this month, reports surfaced that Trump would give the old heave-ho to the Energy Department, among others. In that case, it would be bye-bye Brookhaven and all of the other laboratories under the Energy Department umbrella. Fortunately, the national laboratory system is still intact — for now — so US taxpayers (disclosure: that includes me) can go ahead and give themselves a nice group hug for supporting Brookhaven, Bozovic, and his research team. In 2014, Bozovic’s record of achievement garnered him a spot among the 2,800 members of Academia Europea, the European Academy of Humanities, Letters, and Sciences. That’s this: Among the members are fifty-two Nobel Laureates, several of whom were elected to the Academia before they received that prestigious prize. Invitations are made only after nomination by existing members followed by an extensive peer review to scrutinize and confirm each individual’s scholarship and eminence in their chosen field. Here’s a little more on Bozovic’s record: His research results have been published in more than 200 highly cited research papers, many in the highest-impact journals such as Nature, Science, and Nature Materials. Bozovic is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and of SPIE, the International Society for Optics and Photonics, and a Foreign Member of Serbian Academy of Science and Arts. Aside from pumping high-risk foundational research into the national economy, the Energy Department also directly supports the private sector through funding for startups (the SunShot Catalyst program is one good example) as well as loan guarantees for the big players. In one recent example, last summer the Energy Department announced $4.5 million in loan guarantees for Ford, GM, Nissan, Tesla and other stakeholders to expand the nation’s EV charging infrastructure. The goal is to enable “coast-to-coast, nationwide zero emissions travel” by 2020. Follow me on Twitter and Google+. Image: “This composite image offers a glimpse inside the custom system Brookhaven scientists used to create samples of materials that may pave the way for high-temperature superconductors” courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Buy a cool T-shirt or mug in the CleanTechnica store!   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech daily newsletter or weekly newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.


BEERSE, Belgique, le 25 novembre 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Janssen-Cilag International NV (Janssen) a annoncé aujourd'hui la soumission d'une demande d'autorisation de mise sur le marché à l'Agence européenne des médicaments (AEM), afin de solliciter l'agrément du guselkumab pour le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère. Le guselkumab est un anticorps monoclonal humain qui cible la protéine interleukine (IL)-23, dont il a été montré qu'elle joue un rôle essentiel dans le développement des maladies inflammatoires à médiation immunitaire.1 Le psoriasis est une maladie inflammatoire chronique auto-immune qui se traduit par une surproduction de cellules cutanées et se caractérise par des lésions, ou plaques, rouges, surélevées, enflammées, squameuses, qui peuvent provoquer des démangeaisons, un sentiment d'inconfort et des douleurs.2 L'on estime que quelque 14 millions d'Européens sont atteints de psioriasis3, allant d'une forme modérée à sévère et invalidante, et peut souvent altérer la qualité de vie.4 « Nous nous efforçons de découvrir et développer des thérapies novatrices pour répondre aux besoins médicaux continus non satisfaits des personnes qui vivent avec le psoriasis », a déclaré Newman Yeilding, MD, directeur du développement de l'immunologie chez Janssen Research & Development, LLC. « Nous nous réjouissons à l'idée de travailler avec l'AME lors de l'examen de la demande par l'Agence, alors que nous sollicitons l'agrément du guselkumab pour le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère dans l'Union européenne. » Les données de quatre études évaluant l'efficacité et l'innocuité du guselkumab administré par injection sous-cutanée dans le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère ont servi de base pour la demande : les études de phase 3 VOYAGE 15 , VOYAGE 26 et NAVIGATE7, ainsi que l'étude de phase 2 X-PLORE8 , qui ont paru dans The New England Journal of Medicine au mois de juillet 2015. Les résultats de l'étude VOYAGE 1 ont récemment été présentés lors du congrès de l'European Academy of Dermatology et Venereology (EADV), et les résultats des études VOYAGE 2 et NAVIGATE devraient être présentées lors de prochains congrès scientifiques. Le guselkumab est un anticorps monoclonal humain avec un mécanisme d'action novateur qui cible la protéine interleukine (IL)-23 et est en développement de phase 3 sous forme de thérapie administrée par voie sous-cutanée pour le traitement du psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère. Le 17 novembre, Janssen Biotech, Inc. a annoncé la soumission d'une demande de licence de produit biologique auprès de la Food and Drug Administration aux États-Unis sollicitant l'agrément du guselkumab pour le traitement des adultes vivant avec le psoriasis en plaques modéré à sévère. En outre, les résultats d'une étude de phase 2 évaluant le guselkumab dans le traitement des patients atteints de rhumatismes psoriasiques actifs ont récemment été présentés lors de la réunion de l'American College of Rheumatology et un programme de phase 3 pour cette indication est prévu. Le psoriasis est une maladie inflammatoire chronique auto-immune qui se traduit par une surproduction de cellules cutanées et se caractérise par des lésions, ou plaques, rouges, surélevées, enflammées, squameuses, qui peuvent provoquer des démangeaisons et des douleurs physiques.2 L'on estime que quelque 125 millions de personnes dans le monde sont atteintes de psioriasis9, dont 14 millions d'Européens3, et environ 20 % des personnes affectées ont des cas considérés comme modérés à sévères.10 À propos des sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen de Johnson & Johnson Dans les sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen de Johnson & Johnson, nous travaillons pour créer un monde sans maladies. Transformer la vie en trouvant de nouvelles et meilleures façons de prévenir, intercepter, traiter et soigner les maladies nous inspire. Nous réunissons les meilleurs cerveaux et explorons la science la plus prometteuse. Nous sommes Janssen. Nous collaborons avec le monde entier pour la santé de chacun en son sein. En savoir plus sur www.janssen.com/emea. Suivez-nous sur Twitter.com/JanssenEMEA. Janssen-Cilag International NV, Janssen Research & Development, LLC et Janssen Biotech, Inc. font partie des sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen de Johnson & Johnson. Le présent communiqué de presse contient des « énoncés prospectifs » au sens de la loi Private Securities Litigation Reform Act de 1995, concernant le développement de nouveaux produits. Il est conseillé au lecteur de ne pas se fier outre mesure à ces énoncés prospectifs. Ces énoncés sont fondés sur les attentes actuelles concernant des événements futurs. Si les hypothèses sous-jacentes s'avèrent inexactes ou si des risques ou incertitudes connus ou inconnus se matérialisent, les résultats réels peuvent différer sensiblement des attentes et projections de Janssen-Cilag International NV, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Janssen Biotech, Inc. et/ou Johnson & Johnson. Les risques et incertitudes incluent, sans toutefois s'y limiter : les défis et incertitudes inhérents à la recherche et au développement de produits, et notamment l'incertitude concernant le succès clinique et l'obtention des autorisations réglementaires ; l'incertitude concernant la réussite commerciale ; la concurrence, et notamment les avancées technologiques, les nouveaux produits et brevets obtenus par nos concurrents ; la contestation de brevets ; les difficultés et retards en matière de fabrication ; les préoccupations relatives à l'efficacité et à l'innocuité des produits entraînant des rappels de produits ou des mesures réglementaires ; les modifications des lois et réglementations applicables, et notamment les réformes en matière de soins de santé à l'échelle mondiale ; et les tendances à la maîtrise des coûts des soins de santé. Une liste et une description plus complètes de ces risques, incertitudes et autres facteurs peuvent être trouvées dans le rapport annuel de Johnson & Johnson sur le formulaire 10-K pour l'exercice clos au 3 janvier 2016, y compris dans le document 99 joint à ce rapport, et dans les documents déposés ultérieurement par la société auprès de la Securities and Exchange Commission. Des copies de ces documents sont disponibles en ligne à www.sec.gov, www.jnj.com, ou sur demande auprès de Johnson & Johnson. Aucune des sociétés pharmaceutiques Janssen ou Johnson & Johnson ne s'engage à mettre à jour des énoncés prospectifs, que ce soit en raison de nouveaux renseignements, d'événements ou développements futurs.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

On Friday, The Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) honors Danish Professor Bo Barker Jørgensen with the prestigious 2017 A.C. Redfield Award at the Aquatic Sciences Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii 26 February - 03 March, 2017. Dr. Bo Barker Jørgensen receives the prize for his lifelong and groundbreaking work advancing our understanding of marine sediment microbial ecology and biogeochemistry. His work has ranged from surface sediments to the deep biosphere, several kilometers into the seabed. ASLO is an international aquatic science society founded in 1948. For more information about ASLO, please visit their website: http://www. . In their press release, ASLO writes, "Bo Barker Jørgensen has led the way in advancing our understanding of the biogeochemistry and microbial ecology of marine sediments. His papers have been cited more than 32,000 times, with two of his papers having over one thousand citations each. Colleagues say these statistics are evidence of Jørgensen's "jaw dropping" influence on science and a tribute to the huge impact of his lifelong work." ASLO also highlights Bo Barker Jørgensen's early research on the sulfur cycle in marine sediments presented in a paper in 1977. The method he developed for determining the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction in marine sediments is still in use today and his paper is of one of the most highly cited papers in marine sediment biogeochemistry. Another highlight in a long and illustrious science career is the work of Bo Barker Jørgensen and then graduate student, Niels Peter Revsbech who is now a professor and colleague at Aarhus University, Denmark. During the late 70's and early 80's they used oxygen microelectrodes for the first time to measure the distribution of oxygen in sediments, "...shocking the scientific community with their discovery that oxygen penetrates only a few millimeters into coastal sediments. Their introduction of microelectrodes revolutionized our understanding of the distribution and dynamics of oxygen and oxidants in marine sediments," ASLO writes in their nomination. Bo Barker Jørgensen is famous not only for developing techniques, instruments and publishing influential papers, but the A. C. Redfield award also recognizes his work achievements as a mentor. Many of the young scientists he advised have established successful scientific careers of their own. "The list of students, postdoctoral fellows and colleagues who have been mentored by Jørgensen reads like a virtual 'who's who' of marine microbiology," the nomination reads. Bo Barker Jørgensen's vision for microbial research is credited by colleagues as central for the establishment of Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany. Bo Barker Jørgensen served as director of the Institute from 1992-2011, and helped to establish it as a world leader in research on marine microbes. In 2007, Bo Barker Jørgensen established the Center for Geomicrobiology in Aarhus, where he has built an international team of leading scientists focused on sediments in the deep biosphere. "He and his team are 'providing fundamental and new insights into the nature of what may be the largest, yet least known, biosphere on Earth,'" it is written in the nomination. Contact: Bo Barker Jørgensen is at the moment in Hawaii but can be reached on mail: bo.barker@bios.au.dk The ASLO Lifetime Achievement award is given to those that have excelled in limnologic and oceanographic research, education, service to the community and society throughout a lifetimes work. The prize was first presented in 1994 and has since 2004 been named after Alfred Clarence Redfield, an American oceanographer whose major discovery was the atomic ratio between nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon found in marine plankton (phytoplankton), also known as the Redfield ratio. Dr. Jørgensen is Professor and Head of the Center for Geomicrobiology at Aarhus University in Denmark. In his long career, Bo Barker Jørgensen has received numerous prizes and honors for his impressive work: Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, 2009 Fellow of the European Academy of Microbiology, 2009

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