Eupheria Biotech GmbH

Dresden, Germany

Eupheria Biotech GmbH

Dresden, Germany
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Chakraborty D.,University Hospital and Medical | Chakraborty D.,Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics | Kappei D.,University Hospital and Medical | Kappei D.,Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics | And 17 more authors.
Nature Methods | Year: 2012

Whereas methods to comprehensively study cellular roles of protein-coding genes are available, techniques to systematically investigate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which have been implicated in diverse biological pathways, are limited. Here we report combined knockdown and localization analysis of noncoding RNAs (c-KLAN) that merges functional characterization and localization approaches to study lncRNAs. Using this technique we identified transcripts that regulate mouse embryonic stem cell identity. © 2012 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.


Theis M.,TU Dresden | Theis M.,Eupheria Biotech GmbH | Paszkowski-Rogacz M.,TU Dresden | Paszkowski-Rogacz M.,Eupheria Biotech GmbH | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Biomolecular Screening | Year: 2015

Broad sequencing enterprises such as the FANTOM or ENCODE projects have substantially extended our knowledge of the human transcriptome. They have revealed that a large portion of genomic DNA is actively transcribed and have identified a plethora of novel transcripts. Many newly identified transcripts belong to the class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which range from a few hundred bases to multiple kilobases in length and harbor no protein-coding potential. Although the biological activity of some lncRNAs is understood, the functions of most lncRNAs remain elusive. Tools that allow rapid and cost-effective access to functional data of lncRNAs are therefore essential. Here, we describe the construction and validation of an endoribonuclease-prepared siRNA (esiRNA) library designed to target 1779 individual human lncRNAs by RNA interference. We present a compendium of lncRNA expression data for 11 human cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we show that the resource is suitable for combined knockdown and localization analysis. We discuss challenges in sequence annotation of lncRNAs with respect to their often low and cell type-specific expression and specify esiRNAs that are suitable for targeting lncRNAs in commonly used human cell lines. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.


PubMed | TU Dresden, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics and Eupheria Biotech GmbH
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of biomolecular screening | Year: 2015

Broad sequencing enterprises such as the FANTOM or ENCODE projects have substantially extended our knowledge of the human transcriptome. They have revealed that a large portion of genomic DNA is actively transcribed and have identified a plethora of novel transcripts. Many newly identified transcripts belong to the class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which range from a few hundred bases to multiple kilobases in length and harbor no protein-coding potential. Although the biological activity of some lncRNAs is understood, the functions of most lncRNAs remain elusive. Tools that allow rapid and cost-effective access to functional data of lncRNAs are therefore essential. Here, we describe the construction and validation of an endoribonuclease-prepared siRNA (esiRNA) library designed to target 1779 individual human lncRNAs by RNA interference. We present a compendium of lncRNA expression data for 11 human cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we show that the resource is suitable for combined knockdown and localization analysis. We discuss challenges in sequence annotation of lncRNAs with respect to their often low and cell type-specific expression and specify esiRNAs that are suitable for targeting lncRNAs in commonly used human cell lines.


Schmitt-Engel C.,University of Gottingen | Schmitt-Engel C.,Friedrich - Alexander - University, Erlangen - Nuremberg | Schultheis D.,Friedrich - Alexander - University, Erlangen - Nuremberg | Schwirz J.,University of Gottingen | And 32 more authors.
Nature Communications | Year: 2015

Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Snetkov X.,Francis Crick Institute | Weisswange I.,Francis Crick Institute | Weisswange I.,Eupheria Biotech GmbH | Pfanzelter J.,Francis Crick Institute | And 3 more authors.
Nature Microbiology | Year: 2016

During its egress, vaccinia virus transiently recruits AP-2 and clathrin after fusion with the plasma membrane. This recruitment polarizes the viral protein A36 beneath the virus, enhancing actin polymerization and the spread of infection. We now demonstrate that three NPF motifs in the C-terminus of A36 recruit AP-2 and clathrin by interacting directly with the Epsin15 homology domains of Eps15 and intersectin-1. A36 is the first identified viral NPF motif containing protein shown to interact with endocytic machinery. Vaccinia still induces actin tails in the absence of the A36 NPF motifs. Their loss, however, reduces the cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia. This is due to a significant reduction in virus release from infected cells, as the lack of intersectin-1 recruitment leads to a loss of Cdc42 activation, impairing N-WASP-driven Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. Our results suggest that initial A36-mediated virus release plays a more important role than A36-driven super-repulsion in promoting the cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited, part of Springer Nature.


Donnelly S.K.,Cancer Research UK Research Institute | Weisswange I.,Cancer Research UK Research Institute | Weisswange I.,Eupheria Biotech GmbH | Zettl M.,Cancer Research UK Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Current Biology | Year: 2013

Nck links phosphotyrosine-based signaling to Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization during many different cellular processes as well as actin-based motility of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) [1, 2], vaccinia [3, 4], and other vertebrate poxviruses [5] by interacting with N-WASP/WASP [6, 7]. Nck also binds WASP-interacting protein (WIP) [8], which inhibits the ability of N-WASP to activate the Arp2/3 complex until it receives an appropriate signaling input [9, 10]. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Nck, WIP, or N-WASP [3, 11, 12], we have investigated whether an interaction of Nck with both WIP and N-WASP is required for their recruitment to vaccinia during Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly. We find that WIP or its homolog WIRE is required for N-WASP recruitment and actin-based motility of the virus. WIP contains two Nck-binding sites and is recruited to the virus, bound to N-WASP, by interacting with the second SH3 domain of Nck. N-WASP also contains two Nck-binding sites, but its recruitment is dependent on its interaction with WIP rather than Nck. The first and third SH3 domains of Nck are not required to recruit the WIP:N-WASP complex but are essential to stimulate actin assembly. We have established that WIP acts as an essential link between Nck and N-WASP. Our observations provide important insights into the hierarchy and connections in one of the major cellular signaling networks stimulating Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin polymerization. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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