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Solon, OH, United States

We present here our recent results of the Euclid Techlabs LLC/Argonne National Laboratory/St.Petersburg Electrotechnical University "LETI" collaboration on wakefield high energy acceleration of electron bunches in dielectric based accelerating structures. This program concentrates primarily on Cherenkov radiation studies providing efficient high energy generation aimed at a future 1 TeV collider. We report here on recent experiments in high power Cherenkov radiation and corresponding dielectric material developments and characterizations. Progress in diamond, quartz and microwave low-loss ceramic structure development in GHz and THz frequency ranges is presented. Beam Breakup effects and transverse bunch stability are discussed as well. We e report on recent progress on tunable dielectric based structure development. A special subject of our paper is transformer ratio enhancement schemes providing energy transfer efficiency for the dielectric based wakefield acceleration. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Kanareykin A.,Euclid Techlabs LLC
AIP Conference Proceedings | Year: 2010

We present our recent results on the development and experimental testing of advanced dielectric materials that are capable of supporting the high RF electric fields generated by electron beams or pulsed high power microwaves. These materials have been optimized or specially designed for accelerator applications. The materials discussed here include low loss microwave ceramics, quartz, Chemical Vapor Deposition diamonds and nonlinear Barium Strontium Titanate based ferroelectrics. ©2010 American Institute of Physics.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.91K | Year: 2015

Statement of the problem: Currently, space-time resolution (STR) in the range 10-21 to 10-22 ms is available exclusively at free electron laser facilities, or by a few laser microscopes based on high harmonic generation. In practice, these tools have limited accessibility due to exorbitant equipment costs or meager beam time allocations. Because such record STR enables absolutely novel physics and emerging behavior in materials, these difficulties make it incredibly hard to accomplish large sets of experiments and cross validate new findings by the same group of researchers or within inter-laboratory collaborations. How the problem is being addressed: We propose to build the first prototype of a GHz stroboscopic TEM with STR ~10-20-10-23 ms, which is comparable or better than the STRs available at existing user facilities. Furthermore, the proposed system will be an affordable tool based on a standard TEM platform. This proposal is focused on bringing together two mature technologies, the CW-kicker-based electron buncher and the TEM, to make an accessible and fundamentally different stroboscopic instrument for imaging periodic processes. The new tool will have GHz sampling rate and time resolution in the 100 fs to 100 ps range, while preserving the unique spatial resolution of TEM. Unique measurements will become possible for many laboratories around the world to significantly improve technological outcome of scientific findings. What will be done in Phase I: In Phase I we will design and fabricate electromagnetic cavity buncher and perform its cold tests (to confirm target frequency and resonator quality factor) in that it is ready for installations in the existing TEM at BNL in Phase II. We will also provide electromagnetic design and electron beam dynamics simulation taking into account actual TEM architecture, and design synchronizing circuitry/electronics. Applications and benefits: Because electron microscopy is not only high spatial resolution imaging tool, but also a platform for a variety of analytical methods, such as EDS and EELS, there are endless application opportunities for GHz stroboscopic microscopy in energy and electronics research to resolve electron and ionic transport in advanced functional materials. Key words: transmission electron microscope; gigahertz; electromagnetic cavity; stroboscopic electron microscopy Summary for members of congress: Present proposal matches and benefits future envisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of DOE and its core mission to promote U.S. competitiveness in advanced measurements science and technology.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.76K | Year: 2015

Linear colliders based on two-beam wakefield acceleration have an intrinsically modular design. A fundamental requirement of two-beam wakefield acceleration that has yet to be demonstrated is the staging of sequential accelerating modules. For a successful staging demonstration two key things have to be addressed: drive beam separation and the timing between the accelerated beam and wakes from different stages. Previous methods addressed the timing issue by sending the drive beam through a 180 degree bend, but this leads to problems with coherent synchrotron radiation and subsequent degradation of beam quality. We propose to use a fast stripline kicker for drive bunch train management. We estimate that the power requirement and turn-on time are well within a grasp of current technology. Synchronization of the main (witness) beam with wakefields generated by the drive beam can be done by a series of variable microwave power delay lines, which eliminates the need to bend the drive beam. We propose to use an overmoded TE01 mode based cylindrical waveguide as a delay line because of the reduced power loss of this mode. In the Phase I project, we have designed and built all necessary hardware to setup and demonstrate a major component of the staging process. Starting with initial staging experiment early in the Phase II work, we will demonstrate the entire staging process by the end of the project. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: Staging is a key experiment that has to be demonstrated for the validation of the wakefield collider concept. If the main (witness) beam can be made synchronous with the drive beam wakefield generated in separate stages, and preservation of the main beam emittance can be shown, then a collider at a given energy can be designed by just stacking together the required number of wakefield modules.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.74K | Year: 2014

Linear colliders based on two-beam wakefield acceleration have a modular design. A fundamental requirement of two beam wakefield acceleration that has yet to be demonstrated is the staging of sequential accelerating modules. For a successful staging demonstration two key things have to be addressed: drive beam separation and the timing between wakes from different stages and the witness beam. Timing was typically addressed by sending the drive beam through a 180 bend, but this led to problems with coherent synchrotron radiation and subsequent beam quality degradation. We propose to use a fast strip line kicker for drive bunch train management. We estimate that the power requirement and turn-on time are well within a grasp of current technology. Synchronization of the main (witness) beam with wakefields generated by the drive beam can be done by a series of variable microwave power delay lines, which eliminates the need to bend the drive beam. We propose to use an overmoded TE01 mode based cylindrical waveguide as a delay line because of the reduced power loss of such mode. In Phase I of this project, we will design and build two essential pieces of hardware for the two beam acceleration staging experiment at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, a fast stripline kicker and an RF delay line. Specifically, a TE10-TE01 rectangular to cylindrical mode converter will be built for wakefield transport and a delay and a stripline kicker will be designed and manufactured. These components will be cold tested and ready for installation at the AWA. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: Staging is a key experiment that has to be demonstrated for the validation of the wakefield collider concept. If the main (witness) beam can be made synchronous with the drive beam wakefield coming from separate stages and preservation of the main beam emittance can be shown, then a collider at a given energy can be designed by just stacking together the required number of wakefield modules.

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