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Vijayalakshmi R.,Ethiraj College for Women | Ravindhran R.,Loyola College
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine | Year: 2012

Objective: To analyze the comparative finger print and extraction yield of D.ferrea root with phenol compound (Gallic acid), as determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. Method: The UV Vis spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy are adequate techniques to fingerprint comparatively and to evaluate the extraction yield of D.ferrea root extract. The higher extraction yield was recorded in ethanol comparatively superior and richer in phenol (gallic acid). Gallic acid has therapeutic application for inflammatory allergic diseases due to its ability to inhibit histamine. Finger print region was recorded between 500-3500 cm-1 for each extract and functional groups were identified and compared with the standard. Result: The extraction factor was superior in ethanol (270 nm) rich in polar molecules. The FTIR signal at 900, 1500, 1714, 3000, 3100cm-1 considered as a good indicator of phenol (gallic acid). The functional groups of each extract were identified. Conclusion: The UV and FTIR method was validated as a good tool to investigate the finger print and to predict the composition of different root extract of D.ferrea. © 2012 Asian Pacific Tropical Biomedical Magazine. Source


Mythili T.,Ethiraj College for Women | Ravindhran R.,Loyola College
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research | Year: 2012

Sesbania sesban (L.) Merr. is an erect, branched small tree up to 6 m tall with soft wood and paripinnate leaves. Flowers are yellow with brown streaks on the corolla. Fruits are sub cylindrical and shortly beaked. Seeds are green or brown and usually mottled. The plant is used as astringent, anti-inflammatory, carminative, demulcent, anthelmintic and antimicrobial. The phytochemical analysis of the methanol and ethanol extracts of both stem and root of Sesbania sesban revealed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, proteins, phytosterol, phenol, flavonoids, fixed oil and gum. The leaf extract showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, protein, phytosterol, flavonoids and fixed oil. In vitro biological screening effects of the methanol stem extract was tested against ten bacterial species and five fungal species. Highly significant activity was observed against the bacteria Erwinia amylovora followed by Escherichia coli. In the case of fungi Curvularia lunata and Fusarium oxysporum were inhibited completely. Source


Vijayalakshmi R.,Ethiraj College for Women | Ravindhran R.,Loyola College
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research | Year: 2012

The present study was intended to establish the HPTLC gallic acid profile of the medicinally important plant Aerva lanata (L.) Juss. Ex Schultes and Diospyrus ferrea (Willd.) Bakh. HPTLC profiling was performed out by the method described by Harborne and Wagner et al. The Toluene-Ethyl acetate-Formic acid-Methanol (3: 3: 0.8: 0.2) was employed as mobile phase for gallic acid. Linear ascending development was carried out in 20 cm x 10cm twin trough glass chamber (CAMAG, Automatic TLC Sampler-4) saturated with the mobile phase and the chromatoplate development for two times with the same mobile phase to get good resolution of phytochemical contents. The developed plate was sprayed with 5% Ferric chloride as spray reagent, dried at 100° C in hot air oven for 10 min. The ethanolic root extract of A. lanata and D. ferrea illustrated the presence of gallic acid with different range of Rf from 0.38 to 0.74. In general, higher degree of gallic acid diversity has been observed in vegetative parts especially in roots. The gallic acid with the Rf value 0.48, 0.47 was present in Aerva lanata and 0.46, 0.47 was reported in Diospyrus ferrea (synonym Maba buxifolia) corresponding as that of standard. The gallic acid with the Rf value 0.47 showed their joint presence in both the root extract. Maximum amount of gallic acid has been observed in root of Diospyrus ferrea compare to that of A. lanata. Detection and quantification were performed by densitometry at λ = 277 nm. The average recovery of gallic acid was found to be 47.50 μg/ml in Diospyrus ferrea and 2.61 μg/ml in Aerva lanata respectively. Validated method showed linear response over concentration range of 100 to 700 ng. The LOD and LOQ values were found to be 100, 300 ng/spot respectively. The results of the present study provided a valuable phytomarker for the identification and characterization of Diospyrus ferrea and Aerva lanata. The proposed HPTLC method provide a good resolution of gallic acid from other constituents present in ethanolic root extract of Diospyrus ferrea and Aerva lanata. Source


Jesintha J.J.,Womens Christian College | Hilda K.E.,Ethiraj College for Women
Mathematics in Computer Science | Year: 2015

In this paper we define a bow graph to be a double shell in which each shell has any order. We call a bow graph in which each shell has the same order l as a uniform bow graph. We prove that all uniform bow graphs are graceful. © 2015, Springer Basel. Source


Pushpam P.R.L.,DB Jain College | Suseendran C.,Ethiraj College for Women
Mathematics in Computer Science | Year: 2015

Let G = (V, E) be a graph and let S⊆V. The set S is a dominating set of G if every vertex in V\S is adjacent to some vertex in S. The set S is a secure dominating set of G if for each u∈V\S, there exists a vertex v∈S such that uv∈E and (S\{v})∪{u} is a dominating set of G. The set S is a restrained dominating set if every vertex in V\S is adjacent to a vertex in S and to a vertex in V\S. A set S⊆V(G) is called a secure restrained dominating set (SRDS) of G if S is restrained dominating and for all u∈V\S there exists v∈S∩N(u) such that (S\{v})∪{u} is restrained dominating. The minimum cardinality of a SRDS is called the secure restrained domination number of G and is denoted by γsr(G). In this paper we study few properties of secure restrained domination number on certain classes of graphs and we evaluate γsr(G) values for trees, unicyclic graphs, split graphs and generalized Petersen graphs. © 2015, Springer Basel. Source

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