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Donostia / San Sebastián, Spain

Arizaga J.,Estacion de Anillamiento de Txingudi | Andueza M.,University of Valencia | Mendiburu A.,Estacion de Anillamiento de Txingudi | Sanchez J.M.,Estacion de Anillamiento de Txingudi | And 4 more authors.
Revista Catalana d'Ornitologia | Year: 2011

The aim of this paper is to analyze the migratory behaviour of the Aquatic Warbler in Txingudi (N Spain). We considered data obtained over a period of three years (2007-2009) from daily ringing during post-nuptial passage. We captured a total of 29 birds in the months of August (24) and September (5), thus obtaining an Acrola index of 0.924% (percentage of Aquatic Warblers out of the total number of Acrocephalus sps. trapped). This rate is lower than in NW France (> 1 to 3.5%), one of the main areas for fat replenishment and rest on this species' migratory route, similar to that found in SW France (0.8%), but higher than the average for Portugal (0.14%). Altogether, 76% of the captured birds were juveniles. Body mass and fat loads were lower than the values recorded in NW Spain (mouth of the river Miño), but similar to other nearby areas in N Spain (Salburua). In one year four birds were recaptured, giving an estimated average stopover time of 5 days and body mass gain rate of 0.1 g/day (excluding a bird that lost 1 g in a single day). Thus, despite its suboptimal habitats, the length of stay and the body mass gain of Aquatic Warblers in Txingudi did not differ greatly from other wetlands such as La Nava in Palencia, where optimal habitats exist. Txingudi, therefore, would seem to be relevant as a stopover and fat replenishment site for the Aquatic Warbler in the Iberian Peninsula. Source


Arzak A.,Estacion de Anillamiento de Txingudi | Jauregi J.I.,Estacion de Anillamiento de Txingudi | Goikoetxea J.,Estacion de Anillamiento de Txingudi | Sanchez J.M.,Estacion de Anillamiento de Txingudi | And 2 more authors.
Revista Catalana d'Ornitologia | Year: 2014

The region of Gipuzkoa (N Spain) has a good White-throated Dipper Cinclus cinclus population whose biometrics have never been studied. The aims of this article are (1) to describe its biometrics, (2) generate useful functions for accurately sexing individuals and (3) assess the usefulness of the formulas given in other studies for sexing birds in Gipuzkoa. Overall, we obtained results that were similar to those reported in comparable studies: males were larger than females and wing length was one of the most useful variables for sexing individuals. Our formulas allowed us to sex correctly 97% of our sample [First-year birds: D1 = 0.52(wing length) - 2.24(index C2) - 44.12; if D1 > 0.40, the bird is a male, while if D1 < 0.40, the bird is a female; adult birds: D2 = 0.54(wing length) - 48.17; if D2 > 0.48, the bird is a male, while if D2 > 0.48, the bird is a female]. This equation is much more accurate than the formulas provided in similar studies carried out in other areas. Finally, we compared the biometry of the Gipuzkoa population with populations in Iberia, Europa and Africa. Source

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