Paris, France
Paris, France

ESPCI ParisTech is a chemistry and physics engineering college run by the city of Paris, France and a member of ParisTech . It conducts high level research in those fields.The students enter the School after a competitive examination following at least two years of Classes Préparatoires. They are called Pécéen or PC1 and Pécéenne or PCN. The School itself is also known as Physique-Chimie or simply PC.The ESPCI ParisTech is one of the founding members of ParisTech and a member of the IDEA League and the UNITECH International Society.ESPCI develops its relations with industrial partners such as Schlumberger, Rhodia, Total, Thales, Arkema, Michelin, which sponsored each yeargroup of students and signed research contracts with ESPCI laboratories. ESPCI ParisTech has signed partnership agreements with L'Oréal and Saint-Gobain for the recruitment of their professionals. Wikipedia.


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The object of the invention is a polymer compositions comprising cross-linked polymer comprising boronic ester functions enabling exchange reactions, as well as free monofunctional boronic esters. These compositions arise from the polymerisation of precursor monomers to thermoplastic polymers comprising at least one pending boronic ester group, said pending boronic ester group not containing any polymerisable group and cross-linking agent comprising at least one boronic ester group enabling the formation of a network of cross-linked polymer containing pending functions and cross-links that are exchangeable by boronic ester metathesis reactions. Another object of the invention are processes for preparing this composition and materials and formulations comprising this composition.


Patent
ESPCI ParisTech | Date: 2016-08-22

The present invention relates to the preparation of a compound library comprising the following steps:


The object of the invention is a composition comprising (a) cross-linked polymers containing pending links and cross-links that are exchangeable by aldehyde-imine exchange reactions and/or by imine-imine exchange reactions, obtained by cross-linking of linear or branched polymers; and (b) free monofunctional aldehydes and/or free monofunctional Another object of the invention is preparation processes of such a composition and the uses of the composition. Another object of the invention is compositions for cross-linking linear or branched polymers and their use to form a composition comprising cross-linked polymers containing pending links and cross-links that are exchangeable by aldehyde-imine exchange reactions and/or by imine-imine exchange reactions. Finally, an object of the invention is the use of aldehyde to catalyse imine-imine metathesis reactions and imine-aldehyde exchange reactions.


The object of the invention is a composition comprising a network of cross-linked polymers. Said network is prepared by radical copolymerisation of the following compounds: Another object of the invention is a material obtained from the composition according to the invention and a preparation process. Another object of the invention is a formulation comprising a composition according to the invention. Finally, an object of the invention is the use of aldehyde to catalyse imine-imine metathesis reactions and imine-aldehyde exchange reactions.


The object of the invention is a polymer compositions comprising cross-linked polymer comprising boronic ester functions enabling exchange reactions, as well as free monofunctional boronic esters. The compositions are obtained from the modification of a polymer by a functionalised boronic ester additive. This polymer can be pre-functionalised boronic ester or functionalised on addition of the said additive. In particular, the invention relates to a process enabling the behaviour of a polymer to be modified by addition of a functional additive, enabling a cross-linked network containing exchangeable boronic ester links to be formed.


The present invention relates to the use of a solution of liquid particles in suspension for the control, calibration and/or performance of physical, in particular optical, measurements in a flow cytometry device for analysis of biological cells, said solution comprising liquid particles (21) of a first liquid phase dispersed in a second liquid phase, said liquid particles (21) having physical, chemical and/or biochemical properties that enable the attainment of physical measurements in said flow cytometry device similar to measurements obtained with biological cells, and said liquid particles (21), having a diameter for which the coefficient of variation within the solution of liquid particles in suspension is less than 10%. The invention also relates to a measurement method and a flow cytometry device implementing the solution of liquid particles in suspension.


The present invention lies within the field of colloidal assemblies and relates to a system for producing solid clusters of microparticles, characterized in that it comprises at least:


Berthier L.,CNRS Charles Coulomb Laboratory | Kurchan J.,ESPCI ParisTech
Nature Physics | Year: 2013

The glass transition, extensively studied in dense fluids, polymers or colloids, corresponds to a marked evolution of equilibrium transport coefficients on a modest change of control parameter, such as temperature or pressure. A similar phenomenology is found in many systems evolving far from equilibrium, such as driven granular media, active and living matter. Although many theories compete to describe the glass transition at thermal equilibrium, very little is understood far from equilibrium. Here, we solve the dynamics of a specific, yet representative, class of glass models in the presence of non-thermal driving forces and energy dissipation, and show that a dynamic arrest can take place in these non-equilibrium conditions. Whereas the location of the transition depends on the specifics of the driving mechanisms, important features of the glassy dynamics are insensitive to details, suggesting that an effective thermal dynamics generically emerges at long timescales in non-equilibrium systems close to dynamic arrest. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Belanger D.,University of Quebec at Montréal | Pinson J.,ESPCI ParisTech
Chemical Society Reviews | Year: 2011

Electrografting refers to the electrochemical reaction that permits organic layers to be attached to solid conducting substrates. This definition can be extended to reactions involving an electron transfer between the substrate to be modified and the reagent, but also to examples where a reducing or oxidizing reagent is added to produce the reactive species. These methods are interesting as they provide a real bond between the surface and the organic layer. Electrografting applies to a variety of substrates including carbon, metals and their oxides, but also dielectrics such as polymers. Since the 1980s several methods have been developed, either by reduction or oxidation, and some of them have reached an industrial stage. This critical review describes the methods that are used for electrografting, their mechanism, the formation and growth of the layers as well as their applications (742 references). © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Biscaras J.,ESPCI ParisTech
Nature communications | Year: 2010

Transition metal oxides show a great variety of quantum electronic behaviours where correlations often have an important role. The achievement of high-quality epitaxial interfaces involving such materials gives a unique opportunity to engineer artificial structures where new electronic orders take place. One of the most striking result in this area is the recent observation of a two-dimensional electron gas at the interface between a strongly correlated Mott insulator LaTiO(3) and a band insulator SrTiO(3). The mechanism responsible for such a behaviour is still under debate. In particular, the influence of the nature of the insulator has to be clarified. In this article, we show that despite the expected electronic correlations, LaTiO(3)/SrTiO(3) heterostructures undergo a superconducting transition at a critical temperature T(c)(onset)~300 mK. We have found that the superconducting electron gas is confined over a typical thickness of 12 nm and is located mostly on the SrTiO(3) substrate.

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