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News Article | May 2, 2017
Site: news.europawire.eu

Mladá Boleslav, 02-May-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — ŠKODA has produced the one millionth SUPERB. The milestone vehicle, a top-of-the-range Laurin & Klement saloon, left the production line at ŠKODA’s Kvasiny plant in the Czech Republic. ​The current third generation has made a major contribution to this success: since the market launch in March 2015, ŠKODA has produced 250,000 vehicles of this top model. The brand’s flagship brings the success story of the series dating back to 1934 to a new level. “This production milestone is an impressive demonstration of ŠKODA’s high production competence and its employees,” says Michael Oeljeklaus, Board Member for Production and Logistics, adding “The name SUPERB represents one of the best and most successful cars in the automotive mid-class.” The third-generation ŠKODA SUPERB has led the brand into a new era since its production launch in March 2015. With its sharp lines, state-of-the-art assistance systems for safety and comfort, powerful yet economical engines, largest interior space in the segment and numerous ‘Simply Clever’ details, the current generation has successfully established itself in the mid-class. For its exceptional qualities, the ŠKODA SUPERB has been awarded the ‘Red Dot Award’ for outstanding product design and the title ‘Car of the Year’ in numerous European countries. The production figures also underscore the success of the brand’s flagship: After producing 136,100 vehicles of the first generation, which was launched in 2001, the production figures of the second generation increased significantly. Between 2008 and 2015, 618,500 ŠKODA SUPERBs left the ŠKODA plant in Kvasiny. The current third generation was launched in March 2015. In just  the two years since, ŠKODA has produced 250,000 vehicles. The modern flagship is celebrating an impressive milestone and raising the popularity of the series to a new level. ŠKODA’s top model has been synonymous with high quality from the Czech Republic on the global markets since 2001. The carmaker builds on the tradition of large, prestigious vehicles from Mladá Boleslav that date back to the early 20th century.  In 1907 the Laurin & Klement FF became the first eight-cylinder model in Central Europe. In the 1920s, the luxurious ŠKODA Hispano-Suiza mobilised the first state president of Czechoslovakia. The inspirational eight-cylinder ŠKODA 860 was released in the early 1930s. The ŠKODA 640 SUPERB followed in 1934. Since then, the sonorous name has represented the brand’s particularly high-class cars. The term comes from the Latin word ‘superbus’, meaning ‘distinguished’, ‘excellent or ‘magnificent.’ Just as the current generation, the predecessors also featured pioneering technology. The 640 SUPERB used the technological platform of the POPULAR; its 2.5-litre six-cylinder had an output of 55 hp. The Cardan shaft ran through the tube frame. Also, advanced independent suspension was utilised instead of rigid axles front and rear. An advantage of this design was, for example, that the stress on the body was reduced due to significantly higher torsional rigidity. This model is a rarity with only 200 ever built. ŠKODA SUPERB – in 2001 the new model was launched in the mid-class In 2001 ŠKODA gave the evocative name a new lease of life. The new flagship of the brand immediately set new standards in the mid-class: no competing model in the segment offered as much space as the new model of the brand from Mladá Boleslav. At the same time, the SUPERB scored points with an attractive design and state-of-the-art technology. A navigation system, GSM telephone preparation, heated seats, xenon headlights, parking sensors and sunroofs were added to the high comfort on request. As standard, modern systems such as ABS, ESC and six airbags ensured maximum safety. The second generation of the modern ŠKODA SUPERB celebrated its world premiere at the Geneva Motor Show of 2008. The impressive new model had even more space, an elegant appearance and build quality of the highest level. In addition, the SUPERB was available for the first time with all-wheel drive. The particularly practical ŠKODA SUPERB COMBI followed in 2009. SUPERB III is the first ŠKODA model to offer comprehensive connectivity In 2015 ŠKODA heralded a new era with the current third generation SUPERB. Never before had such high demands been put on the design of a ŠKODA car. Never had so many new technologies gone into the development of a model. Never before had there been so many new ‘Simply Clever’ ideas, and never had ŠKODA engineers created so much room for drivers, passengers and their luggage. An array of assistance systems from higher vehicle classes ensures greater safety and comfort. The new EU-6 engines are also more powerful than previously, whilst also being up to 30 percent more economical. At the same time, the SUPERB, introduced in 2015, was the brand’s first model to support full connectivity. The modern infotainment system can be automatically connected to Smartphones via SmartLink. SmartLink includes the standards MirrorLinkTM, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The system allows users to operate many apps from their smartphone on the car’s display. In addition, the driver can use the SmartGate function to retrieve vehicle data on their device. The SUPERB was also the first ŠKODA hotspot on wheels with high-speed Internet access. Another highlight is the innovative and particularly practical Phonebox, which charges mobile phones wirelessly. The experience and passion of 122 years of ŠKODA vehicle construction went into the development of the third generation model. The SUPERB impressively demonstrates the company’s engineering and design competence.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A website created by eSchoolView is one of just a handful to be recognized in a statewide competition hosted by the Ohio Chapter of the National School Public Relations Association. The South Central Ohio Educational Service Center was awarded a Mark of Distinction at OHSPRA’s annual conference for its form and function. Just three schools and one other education association received recognition for their websites. eSchoolView, based in Columbus, Ohio, launched a redesign for the ESC about a year ago and has worked with the organization for about six years. The tailor-made site, brings a dramatic new appearance and capability to the organization’s web presence. “We redeveloped the site to deepen the organization’s ability to connect with the districts it serves,” O’Leary said. “It’s gratifying the site won an award for its design, but the recognition also speaks to how to the ESC is using the site to keep the information relevant.” Intuitive navigation, an emphasis on crisp graphics and the prominent role of a photo gallery are key elements to the new designs. Less emphasis on text also increases interaction between the site and end-user. The mobile performance of the site also improved dramatically with eSchoolView’s responsive design. The site is optimized to display on a variety of platforms and is easy to navigate. eSchoolView builds custom websites for K-12 schools — public, private, charter and faith-based — and education organizations with its easy-to-use Content Management System (CMS). The CMS platform works with a number of integrated products and helps clients expand their reach with the ability to embed blogs, surveys, RSS feeds, e-newsletters, podcasts and videos. Websites created by eSchoolView are often recognized at the state level and have received significant national praise. The NSPRA parent chapter recognized Grayson County Schools in Kentucky and Shaker Heights City Schools (Ohio) about nine months ago for their websites. Likewise, eSchoolView was given an Education Standard of Excellence award for Shaker’s site in September by the Web Marketing Association. OneView, eSchoolView’s solution for enhancing data integration, was recognized as a 2016 Cool Tool by EdTech Digest. OneView allows school districts to read and push data back into various student information systems (SIS), such as ProgressBook, PowerSchool or Infinite Campus. In turn, the software increases internal efficiency and parent engagement through one login. eSchoolView was created in 2008. Its revenue growth lands the company on the Inc. Magazine’s 5000 list of fastest growing privately held companies in the U.S. for the third consecutive year.


News Article | April 30, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new analysis describes different classifications of patients who are hospitalized with acute heart failure based on various characteristics, which may help guide early decisions regarding triage and treatment. For the analysis, investigators examined information from the ESC Heart Failure Long-Term Registry, a prospective, observational study collecting hospitalization and 1-year follow-up data from 6629 acute heart failure patients. "We found substantial differences in patients' outcomes when we categorized patients by clinical profile at admission and by certain clinical parameters, such as systolic blood pressure and congestion-perfusion status," said Dr. Ovidiu Chioncel, lead author of the European Journal of Heart Failure study.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

東京--(BUSINESS WIRE)--(ビジネスワイヤ) -- 株式会社東芝ストレージ&デバイスソリューション社は、4月19日から21日まで幕張メッセで開催される「TECHNO-FRONTIER 2017」の「モータ技術展」に出展し、マイコン、モータドライバIC、フォトカプラなど当社の最新半導体技術を使ったモータソリューションの展示やデモ、ブース内セミナーを行います。 「TECHNO-FRONTIER 2017」展示の概要 開催日:2017年4月19日(水)~21日(金) 会場:幕張メッセ 小間番号:4D-19 (展示ホール4) 東芝ブース(株式会社東芝 ストレージ&デバイスソリューション社、東芝産業機器システム株式会社、東芝情報システム株式会社の共同出展) 主な展示内容: 省エネ化に貢献する独自の制御技術(AGC, InPAC)を搭載したモータ制御ICの紹介 ESC(Electrical Speed Controller)にベクトル制御エンジン搭載MCUを展開した事例の紹介 TXZ™ファミリーの新シリーズ「TXZ4」の紹介 TXファミリー「 M470」を用いたACサーボ リファ


CHICAGO, May 2, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Estate Sale City offers several unique services to its clients and shoppers. "We provide valuable time and money saving services like our Property Clean Outs, Estate Sale Planning, Sales Advertising, and Consignment Services. These services help home owners & agents save time and money. ESC handles all aspects of Estate Sale planning, and liquidations." Said - Christopher an Estate Sale City management team member. Estate Sale City's super store will carry a variety of merchandise for sale to the general public such as: Artwork, Fine Imported Furniture, Collectibles, Memorabilia, Electronics, Musical Instruments, and much more! ESC's goal is to provide top notch consulting services with the end goal of having repeat and happy customers. Estate Sale City has multiple departments offering multiple products and services. The Clean Out Ninja's are the property and junk removal service arm of the store. The Clean Out Ninja team can take both trash and treasures out of any property. With multiple trucks, and professional movers, using Clean Out Ninja has become a popular option for individuals who need a property cleaned out fast. Estate Sale City also provides appraisal services and free consultations. Estate Sale City plans on opening the Island of Treasures museum in ChicagoLand 2017. This is an exciting new attraction for history lovers, & will attract growing numbers in tourism and traffic to the Chicago suburbs. This museum will be inside of the ESC super store. Just go into the store and take Artwork Boulevard up to Appliance Drive, and through the Musical Highway, and you can cross the magical bridge, and you'll end up at the Island of Treasures Museum. The Island of Treasures Museum will feature exclusive unique store picks, and one in a kind historical finds on display for the public to see, and potentially purchase for the right price. Estate Sale City likes to bargain with its shoppers and encourages shoppers to get their haggle on! ESC ownership said "A visit to one of our superstores will be magical and entertaining for both adults and children alike."


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Sophia Antipolis April 26,2017. The impact of overtraining on the heart is set to be discussed at Europe's leading cardiovascular magnetic resonance meeting, to be held 25 to 27 May in Prague, Czech Republic, at the Clarion Congress Hotel Prague (CCHP). EuroCMR is the largest and most important cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) event in Europe. It is the annual CMR conference of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI), a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The scientific programme is available here "Journalists can get the latest research findings on how athletes adapt to exercise and whether it's good or bad for them," said Professor James Moon, programme chair of EuroCMR. "There is a controversial suggestion that overtraining, especially if you're over 40, is not necessarily good for your heart." He continued: "We will also hear from Pierre Croisille from Jean Monnet University, Saint-Étienne, France, who scanned ultramarathon runners during the Tor des Géants during their 300 km race. The marathon is a model of training and adaptation - and the ultramarathon is more extreme -- it's almost a model of dying in intensive care as your body becomes really inflamed, so we have an opportunity to understand the heart at the limits." EuroCMR is Europe's leading clinical CMR meeting. More than 1 000 participants from over 60 countries are expected to attend the 2.5 day congress which is packed with state-of-the-art sessions led by international experts and new scientific research in the abstract programme. A future of universal genetic testing followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be outlined in a keynote lecture by Dudley Pennell from the Royal Brompton Hospital in London, UK. Professor Moon said: "The genetics will tell you what diseases you might get - for example heart muscle disease - and the MRI will show where you are in the progression, whether or not you have to change things now or even apply invasive procedures, for example electrophysiology." Members of the press will learn about novel MRI scanners capable of reconstructing images using Microsoft Cloud. Juliano Fernandez from Brazil will reveal how a five minute scan he is testing in 23 countries could bring MRI to less developed countries. MRI has been contraindicated in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) but new research suggests that it may be safe and experts will present the current evidence. "We got this quite wrong and journalists can get the full story in a dedicated session," said Professor Moon. "We're moving towards a world where pacemakers are not a contraindication to MRI which is really important because everyone can get brain, spine or cancer scans they need." Adam Timmis from Barts Heart Centre and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), UK, will discuss the role of computed tomography (CT) scans for patients with chest pain, rather than MRI, echocardiography or electrocardiogram (ECG). Professor Moon said: "The UK is heading towards CT scanning first line for chest pain and the other modalities for refined diagnosis once coronary disease is present. This is a major change in direction. NICE is very credible, so the approach should be considered across Europe." Media representatives can get both sides of the story in a debate on when to operate in patients with valve disease. "Cardiologists replace a valve when it's very narrow but may not think about whether or not the heart muscle is coping," said Professor Moon. "It's a bit like performing a liver transplant in a heavy drinker without checking liver function. In the future we will measure how the heart is responding to the diseased valve using MRI and blood tests and then decide whether or not surgery is needed." 3D printing is a hot topic and journalists can have a close look at how imaging and printing the heart and vessels is helping plan operations for our sickest children and adults at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London and elsewhere. Graham Cole from Imperial College London will show where doctors got it wrong in imaging and how to avoid mistakes as researchers develop new treatments for the future. Professor Moon said: "MRI has transformed neurology and our understanding of the body. It's taken us longer in cardiology because the heart moves constantly. We have sorted those problems out and we are able to diagnose patients with cardiovascular disease earlier, tailor the treatment to the individual, and measure the effect of that treatment. Members of the press should register now for this exciting event."


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Sophia Antipolis, 18 April 2017. The use of smartphones to assist the continuity of care between hospital and community is set to be discussed at EuroHeartCare 2017, which will be held 18 to 20 May in Jonkoping, Sweden, at the Spira Cultural Centre. EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). This year's meeting is held in collaboration with the Swedish Association on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (VIC). The full scientific programme is available here EuroHeartCare is the event to attend for cardiovascular nurses and allied professionals. More than 500 delegates are expected from over 40 countries. During the two-and-a-half day event, members of the press can get the results of cutting edge research from original scientific abstracts and gain insights into topical areas of nursing and cardiovascular care in state-of-the art lectures by renowned experts. Journalists at the conference will hear about smartphone innovations for patients with cardiovascular disease. "Sophisticated wireless technologies are being developed for many aspects of care in the cardiac patient," said Dr Gabrielle McKee, programme chair of EuroHeartCare. "Remote ECG and rhythm monitoring have the potential for patients to alert the hospital when arrhythmias or a heart attack occur. These technologies are easy to use, yet safe, efficient and accurate, and should lead to patients responding and receiving treatment more promptly." "The amount of time patients stay in hospital is much, much shorter than it used to be," said Dr McKee. "After a major cardiac event we give substantial educational information to patients but the chances are that they don't take it all in. Smartphone technologies are enabling us to continue to educate patients, to monitor their risk factors and help promote goal setting, behavioural change and self-care in the long-term." The origins of obesity will be explored by international leaders in a dedicated session. Dr McKee said: "It is thought that when we became farmers instead of hunters and gatherers this increased the risk of famine, and those with the genetic make up to lay down fat survived better. In today's world, this adaptation plus the fact that we need less than half the calories of our forefathers, and that food has become more varied, appealing and calorific leave us at risk of eating more calories than we expend." Members of the press will discover how behaviour change can address the obesity crisis. "We need to shift the focus away from just the weighing scales and kilograms towards developing new habits," said Dr McKee. "For example not rewarding yourself with something to eat when something good happens. At the congress we'll discuss exciting ways that are helping people to change their behaviour which leads to a healthier lifestyle and subsequent weight loss that can be maintained long term." The use of mindfulness to improve mental health and wellbeing in cardiac patients is another hot topic. Journalists will get the most up-to-date research findings on this and other mental health strategies such as cognitive behavioural therapy for treating depression in patients with cardiac disease and heart failure. The theme "Team Work for Excellence in Cardiovascular Care" will be featured throughout the congress. A session on how to build a golden team strategy will show journalists how the multidisciplinary team delivers treatment for a heart attack within an hour from the onset of chest pain, referred to as the golden hour. One of the consequences of good health care and innovation is that we are living longer. Frailty is a growing issue that requires team work between cardiology and gerontology and will be discussed in a session on the new challenges in prevention and rehabilitation. Dr McKee said: "There are many challenges in today's care that mean that team work including cardiologists, surgeons, nurses, physiotherapists and nutritionists is needed to reinforce self-care and prevention messages. This will help patients not only to feel 'fixed' after a treatment in hospital but aware and educated with a care plan to help prevent recurrence."


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

froglogic, an early anticipator for the need for GUI test automation and code coverage tooling for the rapidly transforming embedded markets, expanded its offerings to cover many of the embedded HMI testing needs. Many renowned companies including Bosch, Siemens, GE, FLIR, Prüftechnik and St. Judes Medical have already adopted froglogic’s tools for the quality assurance of the their embedded software development processes. After a very successful exhibition at the Embedded World 2017 in March, froglogic will also present and demo its embedded software testing and coverage solutions at the ESC Boston. You will find froglogic at the booth #1177. For any questions, if you’d like to schedule a meeting with a froglogic representative, please contact sales(at)froglogic.com.


« Aqua Metals acquires Ebonex IPR and its bipolar ceramic lead-acid battery technology; less lead, lighter weight | Main | Volkswagen unveils MEB-based I.D. CROZZ electric crossover concept in Shanghai; production in 2020 » Audi is unveiling a new battery-electric e-tron concept in Shanghai: the Audi e-tron Sportback. The production version will come in 2019 as Audi’s second battery-electric offering, following the introduction of the production version of the Audi e-tron SUV (earlier post) in 2018. The e-tron Sportback uses a three-motor, all-wheel-drive system that will also be adopted in future production Audi models with all-electric drive: one electric motor on the front axle and two on the rear powering all four wheels, transforming the high-performance coupé into an e-quattro. The 320 kW of system power—370 kW in boost mode—propels the electric Sportback 0 to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 4.5 seconds. With the battery’s energy content of 95 kilowatt-hours, range is in excess of 500 kilometers (310.7 miles) (NEDC). We have made a conscious decision to give the Audi e-tron Sportback its first showing here in Shanghai, because China is the world’s leading market for electric automobiles. That applies as much to the infrastructure and financial support as it does to sales. There are already about 150,000 charging stations in the country, with another 100,000 due to come on stream by the end of 2017. We are well equipped for this rapid growth. In the next five years we will be offering five e-tron models in China, including purely battery-powered vehicles with ranges well in excess of 500 kilometers (310.7 miles) such as the Audi e-tron Sportback. —Dr. Dietmar Voggenreiter, Member of the Board of Management for Marketing and Sales at AUDI AG The electric motors are highly efficient over a wide engine speed range, including at low and intermediate load. The electric motors are liquid-cooled, as are the compact power electronics. Audi first showcased the concept for the three electric motors in its Audi e-tron quattro concept study car at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show; the drive system, which provides a high level of advanced torque vectoring capability, is now bound for use in future production versions. A controller continuously computes the optimal interplay of the electric motors for every driving situation. At low load, only the motor on the front axle provides propulsion. When the driver floors the accelerator in the S driving mode and all three electric motors are working together, 370 kW of output and more than 800 N·m (590.0 lb‑ft) of torque are available in the boost mode. In the standard D driving program, the e-tron Sportback delivers 320 kW. The key drive train management parameters are the position of the accelerator, the mode chosen in the Audi drive select dynamic handling system, the driving program— S or D—and the battery charge level. The data on the near surroundings from the sensors for piloted driving, the predictive route data from the navigation system and the real-time traffic information from Audi connect also flow into this computation, always with the aim of optimally adjusting the drive train to the prevailing conditions. Audi is focused not just on performance, but also maximum efficiency. Before even starting out, the driver can have the Audi e-tron Sportback concept compute a drive train strategy to minimize energy consumption. When under way, the Audi e-tron recovers large amounts of energy. Up to moderate braking, the electric motors are solely responsible for decelerating the vehicle. The hydraulic brakes only come into play for heavy braking. The driver can adjust the degree of recuperation in stages. At the lowest setting, no energy is recovered at all in certain situations. Instead, the isolated drive allows the coupé to coast without any retardation torque— one of the most effective strategies for increasing the range. Torque Control Manager, which works together with the Electronic Stabilization Control (ESC), actively and variably distributes the power between the wheels as necessary. ( Earlier post.) This torque control provides for maximum dynamics and stability. Due to the virtually instantaneous response of the electric motors, the control actions are lightning-quick. The drive concept of the Audi e-tron Sportback concept adapts perfectly to every situation, whether involving transverse or longitudinal dynamics. Battery and wireless charging. As on the e-tron quattro SUV concept, the technology study’s lithium-ion battery is positioned between the axles below the passenger compartment. This installation position provides for a low center of gravity and a balanced axle load distribution of 52:48 (front/rear). The large battery block is bolted to the floor structure. With a modular design, the battery is in principle also suitable for other automobile concepts. A full charge of the 95 kWh pack provides for a range of more than 500 kilometers (310.7 miles) in the NEDC. The Combined Charging System with two connectors enables charging with alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC). With direct current and the charging power of 150 kW targeted by Audi, the large battery can store enough energy for up to 400 kilometers (248.5 miles) in approximately 30 minutes. With its geometry and slightly inclined installation position, the charging socket on the front fender is ergonomic. Alternatively contactless inductive charging of the Audi e-tron Sportback concept is possible with Audi Wireless Charging (AWC). This is done by siting a charging pad with integral coil on the floor where the car is to be parked, and connecting it to the power supply. The piloted parking system positions the Audi e-tron Sportback concept over the charging pad with centimeter precision. The charging process then starts automatically. The alternating magnetic field induces an alternating voltage in the secondary coil fitted in the floor of the car, across the air gap. The alternating current is converted into direct current by the on-board power electronics and the battery is charged with an output of up to 11 kW kilowatts. The charging process stops automatically when the battery is fully charged. Audi Wireless Charging technology reaches an efficiency of more than 90%, making it comparable in efficiency to charging with a cable. The alternating field represents no danger to humans or animals. It is only generated when a car is standing above the induction pad. Drivers can monitor the charging process on their smartphone using an app from the Audi connect portfolio. All charging and climate control functions can be controlled remotely with this app. The heat pump also contributes to the efficiency of the concept study. It uses the waste heat of the electrical components to climatize the interior and is thus a central component of the thermal management system. Chassis. The chassis reflects the dynamic character of the Audi e-tron Sportback concept. The adaptive air suspension sport—the air suspension with controlled damping—contributes to efficiency. Depending on road speed, the ride height is adjusted in four stages by up to 63 millimeters (3.5 in), thus reducing drag. The adaptive air suspension sport can be controlled using the Audi drive select system. The front and rear axles are lightweight, five-link constructions made of aluminum and high-strength steel. The wheels measure 23 inches in diameter and are fitted with 285/30 tires. Large brake disks with a diameter of 20 inches at the front and 19 inches at the rear slow down the Audi e-tron Sportback concept safely and reliably. Cockpit and interior. The display and control modules in the Audi e-tron Sportback concept are deeply integrated into the sculptural, horizontal architecture of the cockpit. This is characterized by the large TFT and OLED displays. In its main menu the Audi virtual cockpit behind the steering wheel—framed by a separate, slim cowl—displays the speed, battery charge and range. To the left and right of the Audi virtual cockpit, there are two touch-sensitive control surfaces. The driver uses the compact unit on the left to control the lighting functions. The one on the right—a 10-inch OLED touch display—is for controlling the infotainment and navigation systems. The functions in the main menu appear as a neat arrangement of tiles which each calls up the respective submenus. Important functions can also be operated using hot keys. Below this large display on the center console, there is a further touch-sensitive OLED screen for operating the climate control and various auxiliary functions. All occupants can read off information on the ambient air quality on an overhead module. Towards the front of the door shoulders there is a further display with gently curving surfaces that serves as a digital exterior mirror. Its specially processed camera image is bright even in poor lighting conditions, with good contrast and no glare. The two rear passengers in the Audi e-tron Sportback concept likewise have their own touch displays in the door shoulders. They also use these to operate the climate control and infotainment for their area or to exchange media data with the driver. When the car is stationary, the displays can show the images from the exterior mirror cameras. This helps occupants to locate road users approaching the car from behind before they open the door, reducing the risk of collision. The concept study is connected to the Internet by an LTE module. Passengers can surf the web and send e‑mails with their mobile devices. Tailored services from the Audi connect portfolio are delivered to the car for the driver. The driver can also operate many functions of the Audi e-tron Sportback concept from the flat-bottomed steering wheel. Its horizontal spokes are equipped with touch surfaces. The driver selects the recuperation levels with two paddles. The center console includes a flat, slim selector lever with a slide control on its left for selecting the driving programs. The driver moves between the drive positions by gently tapping it forward and back.


Research being presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2017 Meeting suggests treating opioid-exposed newborns based on how well they can sleep and be consoled also helps avoid drug-based therapy SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - New research suggests a revamped, "common sense" approach to treating newborns suffering opioid withdrawal--gauging whether the baby can eat, sleep and be consoled within 10 minutes before administering drugs to wean them off exposure--may safely reduce the length of hospitalization they need. An abstract of the study, "A Novel Approach to Evaluating and Treating Infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)," will be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2017 Meeting in San Francisco on Sunday, May 7. An estimated 95 percent of U.S. hospitals use the Finnegan Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System (FNASS) to guide treatment, based on 21 symptoms of opioid withdrawal. These include tremors, seizures, excessive crying, diarrhea, vomiting, congestion, sneezing and other symptoms that can make it difficult for the baby to eat and sleep. Babies with severe symptoms are started on pharmacologic therapy, typically using the narcotics morphine or methadone. Researchers at Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital examined whether more non-pharmacologic interventions for NAS in a modified approach called the Eat, Sleep, Console (ESC) model, such as providing a low-stimulation environment, having mothers room-in with their infants and feeding them frequently, could help infants go home sooner. Fifty babies were included in the study between March 2014 and August 2015. The researchers determined traditional FNASS guidelines would have indicated starting morphine treatment in 30 (60 percent) of the infants. With the ESC guidelines used instead, however, morphine was started on just 6 patients (12 percent). The study also found that of the 301 patient days evaluated, the FNASS score recommended starting or increasing morphine therapy on one-quarter of the days. Instead, following the ESC model, morphine was started or increased on just 3 percent of the days. Using the alternative approach helped reduce the length of hospitalization for infants with NAS from 22.5 to 5.9 days without an increase in readmission rate, said Matthew Grossman, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine and Quality and Safety Officer for the hospital who launched the ESC model there in 2011. Abstract author Matthew Lipshaw, MD, FAAP, said the findings are particularly important with the current opioid epidemic in the United States. The incidence of NAS increased fivefold between 2000-2015 in the United States, Dr. Lipshaw noted, resulting in an estimated $1.5 billion in hospital charges in 2012 alone. "We found that a common sense approach based on the functional well-being of infants is a safe and more effective way to treat NAS than traditional treatment guidelines, substantially reducing exposure to opioids in these infants and better meeting patient needs," Dr. Lipshaw said. Dr. Lipshaw will present the abstract, "A Novel Approach to Evaluating and Treating Infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome," between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, May 7, at the Moscone West Convention Center in San Francisco. Reporters interested in an interview with Dr. Lipshaw may contact him at 231-881-1305 or matthew.lipshaw@yale.edu. To reach Dr. Grossman, contact him at 201-824-8507 or matthew.grossman@yale.edu. Please note: only the abstract is being presented at the meeting. In some cases, the researcher may have more data available to share with media, or may be preparing a longer article for submission to a journal. Contact the researcher for more information. The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting brings together thousands of individuals united by a common mission: to improve child health and wellbeing worldwide. This international gathering includes pediatric researchers, leaders in academic pediatrics, experts in child health, and practitioners. The PAS Meeting is produced through a partnership of four organizations leading the advancement of pediatric research and child advocacy: Academic Pediatric Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Pediatric Society, and Society for Pediatric Research. For more information, visit the PAS Meeting online at http://www. , follow us on Twitter @PASMeeting and #pasm17, or like us on Facebook. TITLE: A Novel Approach to Evaluating and Treating Infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Background: Infants born to mothers who used opioids in pregnancy may develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a constellation symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. Most institutions use the Finnegan Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System (FNASS) to guide treatment. Objective: At our institution, we developed a novel approach to treating infants with NAS. Instead of the FNASS, management decisions were evaluated using a new approach which relied on 3 factors: eating, sleeping and consolability (ESC). The purpose of this study was to describe our novel approach and to compare this approach to one based on the FNASS. Design/Methods: We conducted a retrospective study comparing our novel approach vs the FNASS guided approach for the treatment of infants with NAS. The study population included all infants born at >35 weeks' gestation at Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital with a diagnosis of NAS from March 2014-August 2015 who were cared for in both the well newborn nursery and the general inpatient unit. FNASS scores were obtained during the hospitalization but did not guide management. We measured the number of incidences when using the FNASS approach would have led to starting or increasing medication as well as the number of times morphine was actually started or increased using the ESC approach. Results: We reviewed 50 patients with prenatal exposures to opioids with a total of 301 hospital days. FNASS scores indicated starting morphine in 30 infants (60%). Morphine was actually started on only 6 patients (12%) (pConclusion(s): The FNASS has been used to guide the management of infants with NAS since its development in the mid-1970s. Despite its wide acceptance, the FNASS has never been validated nor have its widely used score cutoffs been tested. We suggest that non-FNASS based NAS protocols, using novel evaluation and treatment approaches such as our ESC approach, can decrease medication administration and resource utilization for NAS without leading to significant adverse events. Further work is needed to assess long term neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with various evaluation and treatment approaches.

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