Ergonomics Laboratory

Human, Japan

Ergonomics Laboratory

Human, Japan
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Nakagawa C.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Watanabe K.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Suzuki E.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2010

To develop a more suitable method of evaluating the ride comfort of railway vehicles, including high-speed trains, a fundamental study was conducted on passenger sensitivity to various frequencies of vibration with respect to ride comfort. Experiments were performed on 54 subjects using an electrodynamic vibration system that can generate vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 80 Hz in the vertical and lateral directions. The results of the experiments indicated that the subjects tended to experience greater discomfort when exposed to high-frequency vibrations than presumed by Japan's conventional Ride Comfort Level assessment method.


Saito A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Abe Y.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Takimoto T.,West Japan Railway Company | Nishimoto H.,West Japan Railway Company
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2017

The increasing number and variety of sounds emitted inside driving cabs has created the concern that this may distract drivers. A process has been developed to select sounds and information conveyed through spoken messages (speech information) to ensure they reflect a level of warning commensurate with the importance of their content. This selection method was developed on the basis of interviews conducted with people responsible for system design, and tests and surveys carried out with on-board staff. The importance of the information to be conveyed was split into four categories (hazard level) according to the likelihood of an accident and example sounds and speech information were given for each hazard level based on the degree of warn ing to be impressed on drivers.


Ohno H.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Akiu N.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2017

The visual contrast between tactile walking surface indicators (TWSIs) and their surrounding or adjacent surfaces is important for people with low vision when they walk by themselves. Between two components of visual contrast, luminance contrast is recognized even by people with low vision who have color vision deficiency, so some existing guidelines and standards stipulate numerical criteria for luminance contrast. However, none of the existing guidelines and standards provide enough instructions for the practical measurement of the luminance contrast around TWSIs, which is necessary when applying numerical criteria in real environments such as railway stations. In this paper, the authors propose measuring methods of the luminance contrast around TWSIs, taking the environmental characteristics of railway stations into consideration.


Yamauchi K.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Kikuchi F.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Fujinami K.,Recruitment and Human Resource Development
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2017

The characteristics of the psychological state of passengers when trains stop moving for reasons such as an accident, inter alia, were modelled. Then, guidelines for making announcements were compiled, taking into account the state of mind of passengers. The guidelines were developed with a focus on "organizing ability," "supportive ability," and "explanatory ability." Furthermore, the effectiveness of the guidelines was examined based on the results of surveys conducted on passengers and station staff. The survey on passengers indicated that passengers felt that announcements after the guidelines had beer: put in place, were more suited to the situation than conventional announcements. The survey on station staff indicated that the guidelines had been widely accepted by staff, and were considered useful for improving announcement skills.


Suzuki H.,Science Division Human | Fujinami K.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Izumi Y.,Architecture Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2011

"Human simulation" has been one of the major keywords in recent human science studies. This paper reviews human simulation methods applied to railway ergonomics. One type of simulator uses virtual reality technology to simulate an environment, such as Driving Simulators, Ride Comfort Simulators and Railway Station Simulators. Another type uses computer simulations to deal with topics such as (i) evaluating the mental workload experienced by train drivers and (ii) motion patterns of passengers and injuries caused by train collisions.


Saito A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Sugimoto M.,West Japan Railway Company
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2011

A survey of drivers showed that the level of satisfaction in relation to driving positions varied significantly with body size. Eye height was determined as the most important factor to be considered in adjusting driving positions. In order to provide proper driving positions for a wider range of body sizes, a proposal was made to have a design based on a suitable eye height and distance to control handles. Evaluation of example layouts showed an improvement on existing layouts.


Nakai K.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Omino K.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Shiroto H.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki D.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2012

In order to consider passengers' on-board safety, passenger behavior in the event of a train collision was examined by means of numerical simulation. Taking the hypothesis of a commuter train colliding with a car at a level crossing, key points and measures to reduce the probability of injury to passengers were investigated. Results made it clear that fittings such as handrails or partitions installed at bench seat to divide sitting passenger groups could reduce the probability of injury to passengers. It was also made apparent that shape of benchend partitions and length of baggage racks also played a role in safety.


Saito A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki A.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2013

To improve the operability for drivers with wider range of body size, the reach area of driver desks was measured under a simulated driving situation with a natural seat position in which shorter drivers were seated more closely to the desk than taller drivers. Simulated push buttons were used in exp. 1 and actual ones in exp. 2. The recommendable area in which over 80% of the participants evaluated the position of buttons as "not difficult to push" in exp. 2 was larger than that in exp. 1. It was considered that the area in exp. 1 was applicable to buttons required for precise pointing, while that in exp. 2 was to crude pointing.


Nakai K.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki D.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Enami S.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2016

Dummy models for impact simulation have only been able to assess impact from one direction. Some models are able to evaluate frontal impact, while others can evaluate side impact or rear impact. When evaluating collision safety, separate dummy models arc employed depending on whether the dummy models are parallel to the direction of travel or perpendicular. In addition, it is difficult to evaluate the interior fixtures of Japanese railway vehicles because the physiques of dummy models are based on Westerners. Therefore, a human model with a Japanese physique was developed to evaluate various situations in railway vehicles. © 2016, Ken-yusha Inc. All rights reserved.


Yamauchi K.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2012

An evidence-based training method was developed to encourage station and on board staff to follow rules on making passenger announcements. The effectiveness of this method was then investigated. The rules in question govern how to make passenger announcements when resuming railway operations after a disruption due to an accident or other type of incident. The first step in building the training method was to determine what evidence to selects as the foundation and then how this evidence should be presented and explained. A DVD was then compiled bringing these two elements together. Employees watched the DVD as part of their job training and were then asked to answer a questionnaire. Responses indicated that as a result of watching the DVD, 90% of the employees showed interest in the material and their understanding regarding the efficacy of the rules increased. Furthermore, the results of a subsequent survey conducted one month after watching the DVD indicated that rule compliance increased by 13%, in the group which had watched the DVD compared to the group which had not. These results confirmed the efficacy of education and training using evidencebased explanations.

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