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Suzuki H.,Science Division Human | Fujinami K.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Izumi Y.,Architecture Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2011

"Human simulation" has been one of the major keywords in recent human science studies. This paper reviews human simulation methods applied to railway ergonomics. One type of simulator uses virtual reality technology to simulate an environment, such as Driving Simulators, Ride Comfort Simulators and Railway Station Simulators. Another type uses computer simulations to deal with topics such as (i) evaluating the mental workload experienced by train drivers and (ii) motion patterns of passengers and injuries caused by train collisions.


Yamauchi K.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2012

An evidence-based training method was developed to encourage station and on board staff to follow rules on making passenger announcements. The effectiveness of this method was then investigated. The rules in question govern how to make passenger announcements when resuming railway operations after a disruption due to an accident or other type of incident. The first step in building the training method was to determine what evidence to selects as the foundation and then how this evidence should be presented and explained. A DVD was then compiled bringing these two elements together. Employees watched the DVD as part of their job training and were then asked to answer a questionnaire. Responses indicated that as a result of watching the DVD, 90% of the employees showed interest in the material and their understanding regarding the efficacy of the rules increased. Furthermore, the results of a subsequent survey conducted one month after watching the DVD indicated that rule compliance increased by 13%, in the group which had watched the DVD compared to the group which had not. These results confirmed the efficacy of education and training using evidencebased explanations.


Saito A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki A.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2013

To improve the operability for drivers with wider range of body size, the reach area of driver desks was measured under a simulated driving situation with a natural seat position in which shorter drivers were seated more closely to the desk than taller drivers. Simulated push buttons were used in exp. 1 and actual ones in exp. 2. The recommendable area in which over 80% of the participants evaluated the position of buttons as "not difficult to push" in exp. 2 was larger than that in exp. 1. It was considered that the area in exp. 1 was applicable to buttons required for precise pointing, while that in exp. 2 was to crude pointing.


Nakagawa C.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Watanabe K.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory | Suzuki E.,Electromagnetic Applications Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2010

To develop a more suitable method of evaluating the ride comfort of railway vehicles, including high-speed trains, a fundamental study was conducted on passenger sensitivity to various frequencies of vibration with respect to ride comfort. Experiments were performed on 54 subjects using an electrodynamic vibration system that can generate vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 80 Hz in the vertical and lateral directions. The results of the experiments indicated that the subjects tended to experience greater discomfort when exposed to high-frequency vibrations than presumed by Japan's conventional Ride Comfort Level assessment method.


Saito A.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Suzuki A.,Ergonomics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2011

A survey of drivers showed that the level of satisfaction in relation to driving positions varied significantly with body size. Eye height was determined as the most important factor to be considered in adjusting driving positions. In order to provide proper driving positions for a wider range of body sizes, a proposal was made to have a design based on a suitable eye height and distance to control handles. Evaluation of example layouts showed an improvement on existing layouts.

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