Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Saint-Denis-d'Oléron, France

Sabatier D.,CIRAD | Sabatier D.,South African Sugarcane Research Institute | Martine J.-F.,CIRAD | Chiroleu F.,University of Reunion Island | And 6 more authors.
GCB Bioenergy | Year: 2015

Sugarcane is a multipurpose crop whose components may be used, in addition to sugar production, for various energy carriers or end-products (electricity, liquid biofuels and heat) which enhance its economic potential. For many years, plant breeders and agronomists have focused on increasing sucrose yields per hectare and millers on increasing recoverable sucrose per ton of sugarcane in sugar mills. Attempting to exploit the energy potential of sugarcane more fully, calls for a more holistic approach focusing on both sucrose and lignocellulosic components of sugarcane biomass, and gaining some insight into the management practices required to optimize sugarcane cropping systems in these respects. Such options include genotype selection, harvest date with respect to the crop's growing cycle, crop type (plant crop vs. ratoon crops) and harvesting systems (mechanical vs. manual). The effects of these factors are strongly modulated by climate and soil properties, and these interactions are overall poorly known. Here, we set out to examine sugarcane infield management × environmental interactions with respect to (i) sugarcane yield and partitioning of the aboveground biomass; and (ii) sugarcane milling products (recoverable sucrose yield and amounts of coproducts) and their derived energy carriers. Three Saccharum cv. cultivars (R570, R579 and R585) were planted in three locations on La Reunion Island with contrasting management practices and climatological conditions. Quality characteristics of the samples were assessed by conventional and near infrared spectroscopy methods. Product, coproducts and potential energy production were measured and computed using transfer equations and a mill-operating model. Yields and quality characteristics from cultivars and harvesting systems were affected differently by environmental factors - low temperature and radiation, and water stress. The current study also provides valuable information on how combinations between environments, genotypes and practices affect yield and partitioning of the aboveground biomass, and food and energy production. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Piang-Siong W.,ENSIACET | Piang-Siong W.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | De Caro P.,ENSIACET | De Caro P.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 3 more authors.
Industrial Crops and Products | Year: 2012

Sugar cane is a crop which generates large amounts of biomass and a juice rich in high-value natural molecules. After extracting sugar from the juice, the recovering of various compounds such as organic acids contained in molasses could contribute to increase the competivity of the sugar industry. Therefore, according to the biorefinery approach, we propose to study the chemical conversion of one of these acids, the aconitic acid, by esterification reactions. A new series of aconitate esters have been synthesized by combining aconitic acid and alcohols from natural origin. The effects of experimental conditions have been investigated and have shown that the type of catalysis has a significant effect on the selectivity. Kinectics have thus been performed to determine the best conditions to synthetize enriched compositions in esters. Homogeneous catalysis generates the highest yield in triester. Heterogeneous catalysis (macroporous resins) is prefered for the production of monoesters while catalysis assisted by ionic liquid is adapted to prepare mainly diesters. Green indicators have been discussed according to the calculations performed. The resulting polyfunctional esters are totally biosourced molecules and have a great potential as bioproducts for different applications. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source


Gouy M.,eRcane
TAG. Theoretical and applied genetics. Theoretische und angewandte Genetik | Year: 2013

Sugarcane cultivars are interspecific hybrids with an aneuploid, highly heterozygous polyploid genome. The complexity of the sugarcane genome is the main obstacle to the use of marker-assisted selection in sugarcane breeding. Given the promising results of recent studies of plant genomic selection, we explored the feasibility of genomic selection in this complex polyploid crop. Genetic values were predicted in two independent panels, each composed of 167 accessions representing sugarcane genetic diversity worldwide. Accessions were genotyped with 1,499 DArT markers. One panel was phenotyped in Reunion Island and the other in Guadeloupe. Ten traits concerning sugar and bagasse contents, digestibility and composition of the bagasse, plant morphology, and disease resistance were used. We used four statistical predictive models: bayesian LASSO, ridge regression, reproducing kernel Hilbert space, and partial least square regression. The accuracy of the predictions was assessed through the correlation between observed and predicted genetic values by cross validation within each panel and between the two panels. We observed equivalent accuracy among the four predictive models for a given trait, and marked differences were observed among traits. Depending on the trait concerned, within-panel cross validation yielded median correlations ranging from 0.29 to 0.62 in the Reunion Island panel and from 0.11 to 0.5 in the Guadeloupe panel. Cross validation between panels yielded correlations ranging from 0.13 for smut resistance to 0.55 for brix. This level of correlations is promising for future implementations. Our results provide the first validation of genomic selection in sugarcane. Source


Gouy M.,eRcane | Gouy M.,University of Reunion Island | Luquet D.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | Rouan L.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | And 5 more authors.
Field Crops Research | Year: 2015

Improving sucrose yield is one of the main objectives of sugarcane breeding. Splitting this complex trait into yield components should make this task easier, as each component may be influenced in its own way by environmental factors and by genetic background. Abiotic conditions experienced by sugarcane across its cropping areas differ in many respects; among them, water availability and photo-thermal conditions particularly affect sucrose yield formation.In this study, sucrose yield was divided into seven component traits and studied in a panel of 155 sugarcane accessions phenotyped at two sites under contrasting photo-thermal conditions: one in low altitude and the other in higher altitude. The accessions were hybrids developed during the last century and representing the worldwide cultivated genetic diversity. The proportion of Saccharum spontaneum genome in the genome of each accession was estimated by analyzing the genetic structure of the panel associated with two outgroups formed by 19 S. spontaneum and 29 S. officinarum accessions genotyped with 419 DArT markers and using a Bayesian clustering method implemented in STRUCTURE software. A K= 2 number of clusters clearly separated S. spontaneum from S. officinarum, while the estimated proportions of the S. spontaneum genome in the genome of hybrid accessions ranged from 0.5 to 0.Multivariate mixed model of log transformed yield components was adjusted to estimate each component's contribution to sucrose yield genetic variance, taking into account interrelationships among components. Each component's contribution to sucrose yield variance was site-dependent. On the low altitude site with high photo-thermal conditions, stalk section was the main contributor to yield variance, while on the high altitude site with low photo-thermal conditions, stalk height was the main contributor. A linear regression showed that the estimated proportion of S. spontaneum genome in the hybrids' genome had significant effects on sucrose yield and its components. These effects also varied with the site: under low altitude conditions, the estimated proportion of S. spontaneum genome in the hybrid's genome exerted a significant negative effect on sucrose yield, whereas no significant effect was found under high altitude conditions. These results suggest that both efforts toward introgression and selection on yield components for sugarcane breeding purposes should depend on the targeted cropping environment. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Source


Gouy M.,eRcane | Gouy M.,University of Reunion Island | Rousselle Y.,CIRAD | Bastianelli D.,CIRAD - Agricultural Research for Development | And 17 more authors.
Theoretical and Applied Genetics | Year: 2013

Sugarcane cultivars are interspecific hybrids with an aneuploid, highly heterozygous polyploid genome. The complexity of the sugarcane genome is the main obstacle to the use of marker-assisted selection in sugarcane breeding. Given the promising results of recent studies of plant genomic selection, we explored the feasibility of genomic selection in this complex polyploid crop. Genetic values were predicted in two independent panels, each composed of 167 accessions representing sugarcane genetic diversity worldwide. Accessions were genotyped with 1,499 DArT markers. One panel was phenotyped in Reunion Island and the other in Guadeloupe. Ten traits concerning sugar and bagasse contents, digestibility and composition of the bagasse, plant morphology, and disease resistance were used. We used four statistical predictive models: bayesian LASSO, ridge regression, reproducing kernel Hilbert space, and partial least square regression. The accuracy of the predictions was assessed through the correlation between observed and predicted genetic values by cross validation within each panel and between the two panels. We observed equivalent accuracy among the four predictive models for a given trait, and marked differences were observed among traits. Depending on the trait concerned, within-panel cross validation yielded median correlations ranging from 0.29 to 0.62 in the Reunion Island panel and from 0.11 to 0.5 in the Guadeloupe panel. Cross validation between panels yielded correlations ranging from 0.13 for smut resistance to 0.55 for brix. This level of correlations is promising for future implementations. Our results provide the first validation of genomic selection in sugarcane. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

Discover hidden collaborations