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News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

HONG KONG, May 15, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- OP Investment Management Ltd. ("OPIM"), a leading player in the asset management industry, has partnered with Legend Arb Asset Management Ltd to launch its first commodities focused, Cayman-domiciled hedge fund for professional investors. Legend Arb CT Equity Fund's objective is to generate stable returns with lower volatility by deploying a long-short strategy focusing on iron ore plus a market neutral strategy, both trading in equities and futures. Strategies which rely on quantitative analyses and algorithmic processes will be implemented to explore price dynamics and trading opportunities within the iron ore sector. The market neutral strategy will use statistical arbitrage approach to invest in large-cap equities, consisting of A and H shares in Hong Kong. The fund is expected to launch in Q2, 2017. The founder, Kace Lam, has been working on building the first set of quant strategies for more than 10 years, while managing proprietary capital. "As we come from a quantitative background, the fund will use big data technology. The combination using technical and market factors will help us pick stocks for both strategies, and will be tested in different markets. Naturally, this first product will give investors exposure to the market profile of the commodities futures market but with moderated volatility," Kace remarked. Mr. Lam graduated from Erasmus University in Rotterdam and has spent most of his career in proprietary trading, market-making and developing in-house algorithmic trading strategies. Prior to founding Legend Arb CT Equity Fund, he was a trader responsible for market making at Van de Moolen, and was the Managing Director of KinseySoft. Mr. Lam traded financial derivatives in Asia, Europe, and the United States. The portfolio manager, Damien Pang, also built his quantitative background having spent more than 5 years, specializing in data analysis, modeling, and leading research projects with Mr. Lam. Mr. Pang graduated from Chinese University of Hong Kong, and is CFA accredited. Alvin Fan, Chief Executive Officer of OPIM, opined on the growing innovation in the industry: "It is refreshing to see unique strategies that differentiate from common country and or regional focused funds. Legend Arb CT Equity Fund highlights some of the more innovative products, and it speaks to the talent bed that's flourishing now in Asia." OPIM is a leading Hong Kong based asset management company established and licensed since 2004 with Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission (the "SFC") to carry out Type 4 (advising on securities) and 9 (asset management) regulated activities under the provisions of the Securities and Futures Ordinance (Cap.571) (the "HK SFO"). The company is also a member of the Oriental Patron Financial Group and associate of OP Financial Investments Ltd. (Hong Kong publicly listed 1140.HK). OPIM partners with emerging managers to develop innovative strategies for institutional and professional investors. OPIM's institutional fund platform attracts both managers and investors from around the world working with the industry's best business partners in alternative asset management. OP Financial Investments Limited is an investment company listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (Stock code: 01140), and an exempted company with limited liability under the Companies Law of the Cayman Islands. OP Financial develops customized syndicate investment solutions leveraging proprietary capital and co-investment structures to access scalable opportunities. Part of the Oriental Patron Group, OP Financial possesses a strong global network of investment partners and industry leaders. For more information, please contact: OPIM Tel: (852) 2916 9213 Fax: (852) 2916 9223 E-mail: info@opim.com.hk Website: www.opim.com.hk This document is issued by OP Investment Management Limited ("OPIM"). This document, and the website of OPIM (www.opim.com.hk) has not been reviewed by the Securities and Futures Commission of Hong Kong. This document is solely for information purposes and is not intended as an offer, a solicitation of offer or a recommendation, to deal in shares of securities or any financial instruments. Past performance and the predictions, projections, or forecasts on the economy, securities markets or the economic trends of the markets are not necessarily indicative of the future or likely performance of OPIM, any funds managed by OPIM, or any future funds to be launched under the Sunrise SPC Platform. Information herein is believed to be reliable at time of publication but OPIM does not warrant its completeness or accuracy and is not responsible for error of facts or opinion nor shall be liable for damages arising out of any person's reliance upon this information. Any opinion or estimate contained in this document may subject to change without notice. This document may not be published, circulated, reproduced or distributed without the prior written consent of OPIM.


A controversial new study claims that men not only have bigger brains than women – but are actually more intelligent. But not everyone is convinced by the new study – and other scientists suggest that while men do have bigger brains, women’s may be more efficient. Researchers at Erasmus University, Rotterdam, used MRI scans to measure the brains of 875 volunteers – and found that men’s brains are 14% larger. MORE: Muslim ban comments deleted from Trump website minutes after reporter brings it up MORE: This herd of alpacas have been given haircuts to look like dinosaurs, lions and poodles They found that women also scored on tests of general intelligence (by 3.75 on average) – although they perform better on memory tests. Lead author Dr Dimitri van der Linden said: ‘We found that men’s brains are larger than women’s and our analysis suggests this is the reason for lower average general intelligence across a range of tests. ‘We are aware of previous research suggesting women’s brains are better organised or process information more efficiently but we did not look at this in our study.’ The measurements used in the study are also controversial. Dr Joseph Devlin of University College London, said: ‘This is a well-researched study but the evidence is not strong enough to prove that larger male brains are more intelligent than smaller female brains, which makes it a leap of faith, using a measure of general intelligence which has little basis. ‘Men and women’s brains are different and we know spatial navigation is slightly better in men than women, while women tend to have a better vocabulary. But we should be sceptical of claims that men are smarter than women, especially when there is little to no evidence for that and lots of evidence to the contrary.’


Exploring the Latest Research Advancements That Are Shaping Hypertension Treatment Hypertension 2017 will include a series of forums, seminars, workshops and networking with the aim of raising awareness, promoting healthy behaviours, motivating self-care and early detection, as well as creating supportive environments for prevention and control of high blood pressure. Amsterdam, Netherlands, May 10, 2017 --( Realizing the importance to explore latest research advancements in Hypertension treatment, Cardiology Conferenceseries is organizing the 2nd International Conference on Hypertension & Healthcare, which is scheduled to be held during September 11-13, 2017 at beautiful city Amsterdam which has no shortage of beautiful landscapes and unique sites for travelers to explore. From coast to coast, the country is home to vibrant and culturally rich cities, along with incredible natural wonders. The meet is expected to provide great scope for interaction of professionals including in addition to medical & clinical experts and top-level cardiologists, professors and scientists from around the globe, on a single platform. Hypertension 2017 by Cardiology Conferenceseries has been designed in collaboration with Canadian Nutrition Society, Arrhythmia Alliance, National Association for Diabetes Care, Russian Society of Hypertension, Scandinavian Society for Atherosclerosis Research, Argentinian Society of Hypertension, Latin American Society of Hypertension, Asian Pacific Society of Hypertension, Bosnia & Herzegovina Society of Hypertension & Pakistan Hypertension League to spread the awareness about challenges in this field and how to prevent and manage hypertension. Hypertension 2017 will delight the huge gathering with a cordial theme of “New insights in diagnosis and management for hypertension” and anticipates the presence of renowned speakers including doctors, professors, scientists, research fellows, students, business professionals and many more from leading universities, companies and medical research institutions, hospitals sharing their novel researches in the arena of Cardiology, Medicine and Healthcare Major tracks summoned for the discussion include Hypertension & Stroke, Renal Hypertension, Pulmonary Hypertension, Gestational Hypertension, Pediatric Hypertension, Obesity, Hypertension Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Pathophysiology, Causative factors and risk assessment, Pharmacologic and other treatments, Nursing Management and Clinical Case Reports. Prominent speakers at the event: · Peter de Leeuw, Maastricht University Medical Center, Netherlands · Pieter Doevendans, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands · Hossein Tabriziani, Loma Linda University, USA · Stamatios Lerakis, Emory Heart and Vascular Center, USA · Jose Antonio F. Ramires, University of São Paulo, Brazil · Louis Peeters, Utrecht University, Netherlands · Hans Duvekot, Erasmus University, Netherlands · Marc Spaanderman, Maastricht University, Netherlands · Valéria Paula S. Fazan, University of São Paulo, Brazil · Sokolovic Sekib, University Clinical Center Sarajevo and Medical, Bosnia and Herzegovina Hypertension 2017 runs a comprehensive programme, offering delegates: · cutting-edge clinical education · CPD & CME credits, helping delegates to prepare for revalidation · opportunities to network · Updated skills and knowledge. Receive CME credits while enjoying you in one of the Europe's most vibrant and exciting city Amsterdam, full of attractions and activities for the entire family. For more details on Hypertension 2017, please visit: http://hypertension.conferenceseries.com/ For further details contact Jessie Alison Program Manager Hypertension 2017 Email: hypertension@cardiologymeeting.com ; hypertension@cardiologyconference.org Amsterdam, Netherlands, May 10, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a leading contributor to heart disease and stroke, two diseases which together account for 1 in 5 premature deaths (under age 65). In the past decade, the prevalence of hypertension has increased by 11%. Today, over 1 in 4 adults (estimated 1.8 million people) report having hypertension. Diagnosing and treating high blood pressure with lifestyle counselling and with the right medications can prevent hospital admissions, heart attacks, strokes, heart failure, and premature death. Although genetics plays a role, it is clear that lifestyle and diet are a major component. It is often a silent manifestation of underlying untreated medical, behavioural or social conditions. Education, periodic early screening and lifestyle modification significantly delay and even prevent the onset of the disease.Realizing the importance to explore latest research advancements in Hypertension treatment, Cardiology Conferenceseries is organizing the 2nd International Conference on Hypertension & Healthcare, which is scheduled to be held during September 11-13, 2017 at beautiful city Amsterdam which has no shortage of beautiful landscapes and unique sites for travelers to explore. From coast to coast, the country is home to vibrant and culturally rich cities, along with incredible natural wonders. The meet is expected to provide great scope for interaction of professionals including in addition to medical & clinical experts and top-level cardiologists, professors and scientists from around the globe, on a single platform.Hypertension 2017 by Cardiology Conferenceseries has been designed in collaboration with Canadian Nutrition Society, Arrhythmia Alliance, National Association for Diabetes Care, Russian Society of Hypertension, Scandinavian Society for Atherosclerosis Research, Argentinian Society of Hypertension, Latin American Society of Hypertension, Asian Pacific Society of Hypertension, Bosnia & Herzegovina Society of Hypertension & Pakistan Hypertension League to spread the awareness about challenges in this field and how to prevent and manage hypertension.Hypertension 2017 will delight the huge gathering with a cordial theme of “New insights in diagnosis and management for hypertension” and anticipates the presence of renowned speakers including doctors, professors, scientists, research fellows, students, business professionals and many more from leading universities, companies and medical research institutions, hospitals sharing their novel researches in the arena of Cardiology, Medicine and HealthcareMajor tracks summoned for the discussion include Hypertension & Stroke, Renal Hypertension, Pulmonary Hypertension, Gestational Hypertension, Pediatric Hypertension, Obesity, Hypertension Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Pathophysiology, Causative factors and risk assessment, Pharmacologic and other treatments, Nursing Management and Clinical Case Reports.Prominent speakers at the event:· Peter de Leeuw, Maastricht University Medical Center, Netherlands· Pieter Doevendans, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands· Hossein Tabriziani, Loma Linda University, USA· Stamatios Lerakis, Emory Heart and Vascular Center, USA· Jose Antonio F. Ramires, University of São Paulo, Brazil· Louis Peeters, Utrecht University, Netherlands· Hans Duvekot, Erasmus University, Netherlands· Marc Spaanderman, Maastricht University, Netherlands· Valéria Paula S. Fazan, University of São Paulo, Brazil· Sokolovic Sekib, University Clinical Center Sarajevo and Medical, Bosnia and HerzegovinaHypertension 2017 runs a comprehensive programme, offering delegates:· cutting-edge clinical education· CPD & CME credits, helping delegates to prepare for revalidation· opportunities to network· Updated skills and knowledge.Receive CME credits while enjoying you in one of the Europe's most vibrant and exciting city Amsterdam, full of attractions and activities for the entire family.For more details on Hypertension 2017, please visit: http://hypertension.conferenceseries.com/For further details contactJessie AlisonProgram ManagerHypertension 2017Email: hypertension@cardiologymeeting.com ; hypertension@cardiologyconference.org Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Cardiology Conference Series


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

LEIDEN, the Netherlands, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ProQR Therapeutics N.V. (Nasdaq:PRQR), remembers co-founder and supervisory board member Henri A. Termeer, who unexpectedly passed away Friday May 12, 2017 at age 71 at his house in Marblehead, MA. “We are devastated by the unexpected passing of our friend and co-founder.” said Daniel A. de Boer, Chief Executive Officer of ProQR. “Henri was a great mentor, a passionate patient advocate and a key factor in establishing ProQR. His passion to do the right thing in the interest of patients is unparalleled. We are honored to have had the opportunity to work with him so closely and learn from his wealth of experience. He was a true inspiration for all of us, and we will continue to build on the path he helped us to set out. Our thoughts go out to Henri’s wife Belinda, his daughter Adriana and his son Nicholas in this very difficult time.” Dinko Valerio, Chairman of the Supervisory Board commented: “Henri’s independent thinking and experience contributed greatly to the start and growth of ProQR. Working with him was an honour and a great pleasure. We will miss a friend and inspirer.” Henri was our co-founder, vice chairman and has served on our supervisory board since January 2014. From October 1983 to June 2011, Henri served as chairman, president and chief executive officer of Genzyme Corporation. For ten years prior to joining Genzyme, Henri worked for Baxter International Laboratories, Inc., a manufacturer of human health care products. Henri resigned from Genzyme in June 2011 following the acquisition of Genzyme by Sanofi. Widely acknowledged for his contributions to the biotechnology industry and health care field, Henri was active in the areas of humanitarian assistance, policy issues, and innovation in providing access to health care. He was a member of the board of each of Massachusetts General Hospital and Partners HealthCare and a member of the board of fellows of Harvard Medical School. Henri was also a member of the board of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and serves on its Executive Committee and a board member of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO). He was chairman emeritus of the New England Healthcare Institute, a nonprofit, applied research health policy organization he was instrumental in founding. Henri was a board member of ProQR Therapeutics N.V., Abiomed Inc., Aveo Pharmaceuticals, Verastem, Inc., Moderna Therapeutics and Medical Simulation, and was a board member of Allergan, Inc. from 2014 through its acquisition by Actavis in March 2015. In 2008, he was appointed to Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s Council of Economic Advisors. Henri was chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s board of directors from 2010-2011. Henri studied economics at the Economische Hogeschool (Erasmus University, the Netherlands) and earned an MBA from the Darden School at the University of Virginia. ProQR Therapeutics is dedicated to changing lives through the creation of transformative RNA medicines for the treatment of severe genetic rare diseases such as cystic fibrosis, Leber’s congenital amaurosis Type 10 and dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Based on our unique proprietary RNA repair platform technologies we are growing our pipeline with patients and loved ones in mind.  *Since 2012* A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/e641352a-ec62-4e1e-97ed-82ff0ec1d70a


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

PARIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Sofinnova Partners, a leading European venture capital firm specialized in Life Sciences, has appointed Graziano Seghezzi as Managing Partner. He joins Antoine Papiernik, Denis Lucquin, and Monique Saulnier in the company’s Managing Partnership. Graziano’s appointment boosts Sofinnova Partners’ international leadership. Graziano began his career in venture capital in 2001 at Sofinnova Partners where he was in charge of identifying and assessing investment opportunities. Throughout his career, he has focused on company creation through the establishment of start ups, spin-offs, and accelerators. He was the seed investor of Omthera Pharmaceuticals, listed on Nasdaq and then sold to Astra Zeneca, of Glycovaxyn sold to GSK and of Creabilis sold to Sienna Biopharmaceuticals. He also invested and is on the Board of Breath Therapeutics, Corvidia Therapeutics, Crescendo Biologics, Hookipa Biotech, Inotrem and Mission Therapeutics. Graziano also co-founded BiovelocITA, Italy’s first biotech accelerator. Between 2003 and 2006, he worked at Index Ventures in Geneva. A scientist by training, Graziano spent five years working in academic research at NYU School of Medicine (USA), studying oncology and cardiovascular diseases. He holds a degree in genetics and microbiology from the University of Pavia (Italy) and an MBA from RSM-Erasmus University (Netherlands). Graziano Seghezzi says: « I have tremendous respect for the Sofinnova team both on a professional and on a personal level; I am therefore particularly happy to be promoted Managing Partner. This new role comes at a pivotal moment for the partnership which has devised an ambitious growth strategy. With my extensive international expertise, I am looking forward to actively contribute to further develop Sofinnova Partners’ global leadership in Life Sciences ». Antoine Papiernik, Chairman of Sofinnova Partners adds: « Graziano came to Sofinnova Partners fifteen years ago, as he was changing careers from academic researcher to biotech investor. Today, he has built a true investment track record both in Europe and in the United States; we are very pleased to welcome him to the Managing Partnership ». About Sofinnova Partners Sofinnova Partners is a leading European venture capital firm specialized in Life Sciences. Based in Paris, France, the firm focuses on paradigm shifting technologies alongside visionary entrepreneurs. Sofinnova Partners seeks to invest as a founding and lead investor in start-ups and corporate spin-offs, and has backed nearly 500 companies over more than 40 years, creating market leaders around the globe. Today, Sofinnova Partners has over €1.6 billion under management. For more information, please visit: www.sofinnova.fr


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The commonly used antibiotic azithromycin is not linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia, an often life-threatening rapid, irregular heartbeat, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Azithromycin is an antibiotic commonly used to treat bacterial infections -- mostly respiratory and urinary tract infections -- in people of all ages. It belongs to a class of drugs known as macrolides, of which at least one other drug, erythromycin, is known to disrupt the heart's normal rhythm, leading to a condition known as ventricular arrhythmia. Several recent studies have reported conflicting results over whether azithromycin is linked to an increased risk of death from ventricular arrhythmia in people taking the antibiotic. To provide clarity among these conflicting findings, a team of European researchers looked at data on nearly 29 million people in health care databases from Italy, the United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark to determine if there is a link between azithromycin and ventricular arrhythmia. Of the more than 14 million new antibiotic users, 0.1% (12 874) people developed ventricular arrhythmia, of whom 30 were new users of azithromycin. When compared to amoxicillin, another commonly used antibiotic, from the penicillin class of drugs, there was no increased risk of this heart condition in people using azithromycin. However, there was an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia in people taking azithromycin compared to people not using antibiotics at all. "This finding suggests that the risk of ventricular arrhythmia is more likely to be due to a person's poor health and caused by their infection, rather than to azithromycin itself," says Dr. Gianluca Trifirò, Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morpho-functional Imaging, University of Messina, Italy. "This finding was confirmed in several sensitivity analyses and replicated in single databases participating in the study." The authors note these findings may not be applied in hospital settings as the health of patients and use of antibiotics is quite different in community settings, from which the data were drawn. "Current azithromycin use was associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia when compared with nonuse of antibiotics, but not when compared with current amoxicillin use. The decreased risk with an active comparator suggests significant confounding by indication," the authors conclude. The study was conducted by researchers from Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands; University of Messina, Messina, Italy; Italian College of General Practitioners, Florence, Italy; PHARMO Institute for Drug Outcomes Research, Utrecht, Netherlands; Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS Gmbh, Bremen, Germany; University of Bologna, Italy; Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; and King's College, London, United Kingdom.


-- Despite living in strong and supportive families for over 20 years, many children exposed to severe early deprivation in Romanian institutions aged 0-3 experience a range of mental health problems in early adulthood. Experiencing severe deprivation and neglect in childhood can have a lasting psychological impact into early adulthood, according to a unique study which has followed the mental health of a group of children adopted from Romanian institutions to UK families in the 1990s. Published in The Lancet, this is the first large-scale study to follow a group of children who were subjected to extreme deprivation into adulthood, tracking how their mental health and cognition has developed as a result. The English and Romanian Adoptees study began shortly after the fall of the communist regime in Romania. Children living in institutions were subjected to extremely poor hygiene, insufficient food, little personalised care and no social or cognitive stimulation. The study, running since 1990, analyses the mental health of 165 children who spent time in Romanian institutions and who were adopted by families in the UK between the ages of two weeks and 43 months. In the UK, they joined socioeconomically advantaged, stable, caring and supportive families. Comparing against 52 children adopted within the UK, the study has followed them throughout their childhood using questionnaires, IQ tests and interviews with the children and their parents to analyse social, emotional and cognitive outcomes at ages 6, 11 and 15. The latest part of the study followed the adoptees to ages 22 to 25 years old. It includes around three-quarters of the original adoptees - 39 UK adoptees, 50 Romanian adoptees who had spent less than six months in an institution as children and 72 who had spent over six months. The researchers found that the amount of time spent in a Romanian institution was an important marker of children's future mental health. Romanian adoptees who had spent less than six months had similar rates of mental health symptoms as UK adoptees. However, adoptees who had spent more time in the institutions had higher rates of social, emotional and cognitive problems throughout their lives. People who had lived in Romanian institutions for more than six months as children had higher rates of social problems including autistic features, difficulties engaging with others, inattention and overactivity which persisted from childhood into adulthood. They were also three to four times more likely to experience emotional problems as adults, and had lower educational attainment and employment rates than the other UK and Romanian adoptees. This all despite living in strong and supportive families for over 20 years. As children, more adoptees who lived in Romanian institutions for over six months had an IQ of less than 80, but this recovered within normal levels (an IQ of 90 or above) by early adulthood, suggesting developmental delays but no permanent impact on general cognitive abilities. Additionally, one in five (21%, 15 children) adoptees who spent over six months in Romanian institutions did not experience any mental health problems throughout their lives. The next steps of the research will involve an in-depth genetic analysis of the most exposed adoptees who did not develop mental health problems to distinguish whether genetic and epigenetic differences contribute to resilience. "Being exposed to very severe conditions in childhood can be associated with lasting and deep-seated social, emotional and cognitive problems, which are complex and vary over time," said lead author Professor Edmund Sonuga-Barke, King's College London, UK, who conducted the follow-up study while at the University of Southampton. "This highlights the importance of assessing patients from deprived backgrounds when providing mental health support and carefully planning care when these patients transfer from child to adult mental health care. Although focussed on children adopted from Romanian institutions in the early 1990s, our findings may also be relevant to large numbers of children who are still exposed to abusive or neglectful conditions around the world." [1] Because the children were different ages when they entered institutions and lived there for different amounts of time, the study could not determine whether there is a window during childhood development when children may be more or less likely to be affected by deprivation. In addition, it cannot control for other early risk factors affecting the child's mental health, such as maternal smoking or substance abuse during pregnancy, but the authors argue that there are unlikely to be significant differences among the two groups of Romanian adoptees. Writing in a linked Comment, Professor Frank Verhulst, Erasmus University Medical Centre, The Netherlands, said: "Whatever the underlying mechanisms, the findings of Sonuga-Barke and colleagues' study elegantly support the rule of the earlier the better for improving the caregiving environment for young children whose basic needs are profoundly violated. This finding is true for millions of children around the world who are exposed to war, terrorism, violence, or mass migration. As a consequence, many young children face trauma, displacement, homelessness, or family disruption." From its beginning the study was funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council, the UK Medical Research Council, the UK Department of Health, the Jacobs Foundation and the Nuffield Foundation. It was conducted by scientists from the University of Southampton, King's College London, Ruhr University Bochum, The Amy Winehouse Foundation and the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics. [1] Quote direct from author and cannot be found in the text of the Article. IF YOU WISH TO PROVIDE A LINK FOR YOUR READERS, PLEASE USE THE FOLLOWING, WHICH WILL GO LIVE AT THE TIME THE EMBARGO LIFTS: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)30045-4/fulltext


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

HOUSTON, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- TPC Group today announced the appointment of Bart de Jong as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of the Company. In this role, Mr. de Jong will oversee the finance, accounting and investor relations functions, in addition to a renewed corporate development function. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fb6c1743-3e76-42b4-9c8a-520984f6be5b Mr. de Jong has been working with the Company for the past 10 months on a consulting basis, leading corporate development efforts, including the recent divestiture of our Baytown, Texas nonene and tetramer facility and manufacturing site along with the development of the Company’s current long range plan. Mr. de Jong began his career in auditing with KPMG, then held various accounting and internal audit positions at ExxonMobil. He spent the majority of his career with LyondellBasell and predecessor companies, with a wide range of experiences and responsibilities in strategic planning, finance, corporate development and human resources. During his time at LyondellBasell, Mr. de Jong served as President of a number of divisions, including inorganic chemicals and fuels, as well as leading LyondellBasell’s Americas businesses and operations. Early in his career, he also served as CFO of a startup technology company. “We are very pleased to have someone with the breadth and depth of experience Bart brings to TPC,” said Chairman and CEO, Ed Dineen. “In this broader function of CFO, Bart and his team will play a key role in delivering and accelerating the value creation and debt reduction identified in our long range plan. We are happy we have been able to make this and a series of other organizational moves to enhance value and alignment, while providing new employee development opportunities and lowering our SG&A costs.” “This is an exciting time to join TPC Group, and I’m proud to have the opportunity to help the organization with the execution of a sound long range plan,” said Mr. de Jong. Mr. de Jong has a master of science degree in economics from Erasmus University and is a Certified Public Accountant in The Netherlands. About TPC Group TPC Group is a leading producer of value-added products derived from petrochemical raw materials such as C4 hydrocarbons, and provider of critical infrastructure and logistics services along the Gulf Coast region. The Company sells its products into a wide range of performance, specialty and intermediate segments, including synthetic rubber, fuels, lubricant additives, plastics and surfactants. Headquartered in Houston, Texas, with an operating history of over 70 years, TPC Group has manufacturing facilities in the industrial corridor adjacent to the Houston Ship Channel and Port Neches, Texas, and operates a product terminal in Lake Charles, Louisiana.


News Article | March 2, 2017
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The positive effects of exercise outweigh the impacts of obesity on heart disease among the elderly, a new study revealed. Experts from the Netherlands discovered that physical activity may effectively reduce the risk of stroke or cardiovascular diseases regardless of the person's body mass index. The findings emphasize that physical activity is crucial in the heart health of middle-aged adults and the elderly, researchers said. Led by Dr. Klodian Dhana, researchers from Erasmus University in Rotterdam followed 5,344 people who were 55 years old to 97 years old. The group collected the participants' physical activity, BMI, alcohol use, smoking habits, diet, family history of heart attack, and education. Study participants were separated into three weight categories: normal, obese, and overweight. They were then divided by high or low level of physical activity. Dhana and his colleagues found that 16 percent of participants experienced a cardiovascular event during the 15-year study. Physical activity was related to a decrease in risk for developing heart disease, regardless of the person's BMI. There was also no link between heart disease and BMI alone. What's more, participants who were obese or overweight did not have a higher risk of developing heart disease compared to participants with normal weight. Instead, those who were overweight or obese with low levels of exercise and physical activity had a 1.3 percent chance of developing cardiovascular disease compared to those who had high levels of exercise. "In the overall population, we found that physical activity was protective for cardiovascular risk," said Dhana. However, Dhana said the research does not refute the risk linked to obesity in the general population, but it suggests that BMI may not be the most effective way to measure adiposity among the elderly. Dhana said obesity has been associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease. What the team now recommends is for patients to lose weight. In the elderly, weight loss is slightly different. Unintentional weight loss has been linked to muscle loss and death, said Dhana. Being obese or overweight can contribute to the negative effects through the adipose tissue, which speeds up the atherosclerotic process and ups chances of heart disease. Performing sufficient amounts of exercise, however, can decrease the effects of obesity on the heart by reducing plaque on blood vessels, as well as the oxygen demands of the person's heart. Dhana suggests biking, walking, and housework are all helpful ways to keep your physical activity high. About 150 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity per week is highly recommended. Details of the new study are issued in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Sophia Antipolis, March 1, 2017: The benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.1 The observational study was conducted in more than 5,000 people aged 55 years and older who were followed-up for 15 years. "Overweight and obesity is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and it is recommended to lose weight," said author Dr Klodian Dhana, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. "But in the elderly this is slightly different because weight loss, especially unintentional, is associated with muscle loss and death." "Physical activity is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease regardless of age," he continued. "We investigated the combined impact of body mass index (BMI) and physical activity on cardiovascular disease in the middle age to elderly population." The study included 5,344 individuals aged 55 to 97 years of age (average 70 years) who participated in the Rotterdam Study and were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Information about BMI, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, diet, education, and family history of premature heart attack was collected during the enrolment period in 1997 to 2001. Participants were categorised by BMI: normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2); and physical activity (low/high) which was below and above the median in the study population. The group was followed from 1997 to 2012 for cardiovascular events (heart attack and stroke). During the 15 year follow-up, 16% of participants had a cardiovascular event. When analysed alone, physical activity was associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease regardless of BMI category. There was no association between BMI alone and cardiovascular disease. "In the overall population we found that physical activity was protective for cardiovascular risk," said Dr Dhana. "Overweight and obese participants were not at increased cardiovascular risk compared to those of normal weight. We do not refute the risk associated with obesity in the general population even though we did not find it in this older group. BMI may not be the best way to measure adiposity risk in the elderly." The researchers analysed the joint effect of physical activity and BMI. Compared to normal weight people with high physical activity levels (the ideal), overweight or obese individuals with high levels of physical activity were not at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but overweight or obese people with low levels of physical activity had 1.33 and 1.35 times higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease, respectively. "Our results show that physical activity plays a crucial role in the health of middle age to elderly people," said Dr Dhana. "Those who are overweight and obese without adequate physical activity are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease." Overweight and obesity exert harmful effects through adipose tissue which accelerates the atherosclerotic process and increases cardiovascular risk. Physical activity lowers the harmful effects of atherosclerosis by reducing the stabilisation of plaques on blood vessels and reducing the heart's oxygen demand. "People who engage in high levels of physical activity are protected from the harmful effects of adipose tissue on cardiovascular disease," said Dr Dhana. "This may be why we found that the beneficial impact of physical activity on cardiovascular disease outweighs the negative impact of BMI." The Rotterdam Study was an active population, with the 'low' and 'high' groups doing two and four hours of daily activity. This included biking and walking to the shops and housework. Dr Dhana said the important point was that the study compared the two groups and found that more activity was better for health. "Any physical activity is positive for cardiovascular health and in elderly people of all weights walking, biking and housework are good ways to keep moving," said Dr Dhana. "European guidelines recommend 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity physical activity to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease."2

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