Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Belfield, Ireland

Trademark
Equinome Ltd | Date: 2011-06-21

Laboratory devices, namely, DNA collection and storage apparatus. Veterinary and medical devices, namely, DNA collection and storage apparatus. Genetic testing for medical purposes, genetic testing of animals, providing information in the field of animal breeding, namely, horses.


Bower M.A.,University of Cambridge | McGivney B.A.,Equinome Ltd. | Campana M.G.,University of Cambridge | Gu J.,Equinome Ltd. | And 15 more authors.
Nature Communications | Year: 2012

Selective breeding for speed in the racehorse has resulted in an unusually high frequency of the C-variant (g.66493737C/T) at the myostatin gene (MSTN) in cohorts of the Thoroughbred horse population that are best suited to sprint racing. Here we show using a combination of molecular- and pedigree-based approaches in 593 horses from 22 Eurasian and North-American horse populations, museum specimens from 12 historically important Thoroughbred stallions (b.1764-1930), 330 elite-performing modern Thoroughbreds and 42 samples from three other equid species that the T-allele was ancestral and there was a single introduction of the C-allele at the foundation stages of the Thoroughbred from a British-native mare. Furthermore, we show that although the C-allele was rare among the celebrated racehorses of the 18th and 19th centuries, it has proliferated recently in the population via the stallion Nearctic (b.1954), the sire of the most influential stallion of modern time, Northern Dancer (b.1961). © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Source


Hill E.W.,University College Dublin | Hill E.W.,Equinome Ltd. | McGivney B.A.,Equinome Ltd. | Gu J.,Equinome Ltd. | And 3 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2010

Background: Thoroughbred horses have been selected for traits contributing to speed and stamina for centuries. It is widely recognized that inherited variation in physical and physiological characteristics is responsible for variation in individual aptitude for race distance, and that muscle phenotypes in particular are important.Results: A genome-wide SNP-association study for optimum racing distance was performed using the EquineSNP50 Bead Chip genotyping array in a cohort of n = 118 elite Thoroughbred racehorses divergent for race distance aptitude. In a cohort-based association test we evaluated genotypic variation at 40,977 SNPs between horses suited to short distance (≤ 8 f) and middle-long distance (> 8 f) races. The most significant SNP was located on chromosome 18: BIEC2-417495 ~690 kb from the gene encoding myostatin (MSTN) [Punadj.= 6.96 × 10-6]. Considering best race distance as a quantitative phenotype, a peak of association on chromosome 18 (chr18:65809482-67545806) comprising eight SNPs encompassing a 1.7 Mb region was observed. Again, similar to the cohort-based analysis, the most significant SNP was BIEC2-417495 (Punadj.= 1.61 × 10-9; PBonf.= 6.58 × 10-5). In a candidate gene study we have previously reported a SNP (g.66493737C>T) in MSTN associated with best race distance in Thoroughbreds; however, its functional and genome-wide relevance were uncertain. Additional re-sequencing in the flanking regions of the MSTN gene revealed four novel 3' UTR SNPs and a 227 bp SINE insertion polymorphism in the 5' UTR promoter sequence. Linkage disequilibrium was highest between g.66493737C>T and BIEC2-417495 (r2= 0.86).Conclusions: Comparative association tests consistently demonstrated the g.66493737C>T SNP as the superior variant in the prediction of distance aptitude in racehorses (g.66493737C>T, P = 1.02 × 10-10; BIEC2-417495, Punadj.= 1.61 × 10-9). Functional investigations will be required to determine whether this polymorphism affects putative transcription-factor binding and gives rise to variation in gene and protein expression. Nonetheless, this study demonstrates that the g.66493737C>T SNP provides the most powerful genetic marker for prediction of race distance aptitude in Thoroughbreds. © 2010 Hill et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations