Palo Alto, CA, United States
Palo Alto, CA, United States

The Electric Power Research Institute conducts research on issues related to the electric power industry in USA. EPRI is a nonprofit organization funded by the electric utility industry, founded and headquartered in Palo Alto, California. EPRI is primarily a US-based organization, but receives international participation. EPRI's area covers different aspects of electric power generation, delivery and its use.Following Senate hearings in the early 1970s on the lack of R&D supporting the power industry, all sectors of the U.S. electricity industry pooled their funds to begin an industry-wide collaborative R&D program. EPRI was established in 1973 as the Electric Power Research Institute. Created as an independent, nonprofit organization designed to manage a broad public-private collaborative research program on behalf of the electric utility industry, the industry’s customers, and society at large. EPRI’s creation was a recognition of the impact of electricity on modern life. The institute's research and development program spans every aspect of generation, environmental protection, power delivery, retail use, and power markets. EPRI provides services to more than 1000 energy-related organizations in 40 countries. It has more than 900 patents to its credit.EPRI laid the groundwork in the 1970s for the use of power electronics in the utility system, sometimes known as FACTS , established the largest electric and magnetic fields health program in the world and has played a role in resolving scientific questions concerning potential links to cancer. EPRI is in the Advisory Council of the PHEV Research Center and created the world’s largest center for nondestructive testing, used first for nuclear inspection and now increasingly for internal diagnostics of fossil power plants and industrial systems. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

Go down to the basement of your office building or apartment complex, or the garage of your home, and you’ll find a ubiquitous piece of electrical equipment that could be the next frontier for smart, connected energy management -- the circuit breaker. Circuit breakers are a multibillion-dollar market. Projections show a global market of between $13 billion and $19 billion by decade's end, dominated by giants such as Siemens, ABB, Schneider Electric, Eaton, Toshiba, Mitsubishi, and GE’s Alstom. Most of the circuit breakers out there are fairly simple, electromechanical devices that sit idle the vast majority of the time. But the latest versions are coming with features like wireless connectivity and computing power that are meant to turn them into something more like a smart meter or a smartphone. That, in turn, could allow utilities and building owners to start tracking the interplay of grid-supplied power and on-site distributed energy resources (DERs) like solar, batteries and plug-in electric vehicles, or demand response. As more and more buildings start to get these smart, networked circuit breakers, they could augment -- or even replace -- a lot of other equipment used for this purpose today. That’s the idea behind the field trial of Eaton’s energy management circuit breaker (EMCB). Last year, the electrical equipment giant started deploying its smart circuit breakers at about 500 homes with 12 U.S. utilities, including Duke Energy, Southern Company, CenterPoint, ComEd and Pepco. Over the next year, it will be working with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to see if they’re capable of collecting and sharing data accurately, receiving and sending controls to other smart equipment like thermostats or water heaters, and even shifting homes on and off of grid power during emergencies. “We’re trying to understand the functionality and potential value propositions for each device, working on utility-owned use cases,” Tom Reddoch, the EPRI senior technical executive in charge of the project, said in a recent interview. “This is a powerful device to control solar; it’s powerful to control storage; it’s powerful as a [measurement and verification] device.” They’re also particularly useful for electric vehicle applications, because they’re able to serve all the requirements of 240-volt EV charging equipment. "The charging infrastructure is being integrated into the breakers,” Reddoch said. Eaton and EPRI will have devices in the field through 2017, and by next year, they "should have sufficient field data to answer questions about the functional features,” he added. That will also provide feedback about potential modifications that Eaton may want to include in each device, he said. That’s valuable insight for Eaton, which is looking at ways to embed the technology across its product lines. "We’ve been in the circuit protection device business for years; it's in a nice place in the distribution ecosystem," Ron Thompson, Eaton's director of business development for emerging markets and new technologies, said in a recent interview. Each year, Eaton manufactures about 50 million poles -- individual 1-inch breakers -- for the circuit breakers it embeds in power distribution equipment like switchboards and panel boards, and "a percentage of those could eventually become smart breakers. Any time a building is built or retrofitted, that becomes part of the real estate of our products -- and if the breakers are intelligent, I don’t have to put a meter in or a relay for the circuit -- I don’t have to do a lot of things." As EMCBs become standard equipment, they could start to serve as energy billing settlement and load control devices, similar to how smart meters function today, but down to individual circuits in homes and buildings, Thompson said. “The breaker has Wi-Fi communication built in, to connect to the Wi-Fi in the home,” he said. “In real time, if a utility is experiencing an under-voltage or under-frequency condition, we can measure it and respond,” he said. There are challenges in bringing new technologies to such an entrenched market, however. “The circuit breaker world has been one of the trickiest in terms of customer acceptance,” said John DeBoer, new product introduction manager for Siemens, in an interview last month. “It’s a classic industry that’s been really grounded in safety and reliable distribution of power. Their job is to sit there for a long time, and wait for that one moment when something unsafe happens in the electrical system. They’re trying to protect that wire.” Even so, Siemens is looking far ahead for the next generation of smart circuit breakers, including the latest in solid-state power electronics. In February, the German industrial giant invested in Charlotte, N.C.-based startup Atom Power, which has designed a solid-state circuit breaker that replaces the electromechanical features of a traditional device with digital power control. Solid-state circuit breakers have actually been around since the 1970s. "But the technology wasn’t ready, and the customers definitely weren't going to pay for them," DeBoer said. But advances in solid-state power electronics have increased the capability and lowered the price of devices like these, he said. In terms of design, “the biggest thing that Atom Power has done well is they’ve gotten the solid-state device fully in series. It is sitting entirely within the conduction path,” he said. That makes Atom Power’s devices faster, and thus safer, than classic electromechanical systems, which take a few milliseconds to move, he said. “A solid-state device can move at the speed of a computer,” improving the device’s kilo-amperes interrupting capacity, or KAIC, a key measure of a circuit breaker’s ability to perform its core function of keeping electrical equipment safe from surges, arcs and other hazards. Beyond that, Atom Power’s integrated switches and panels can serve all the smart functions of an inverter or smart meter, he said. “The market for the metering of energy is absolutely exploding right now -- and it’s metering at all levels. I would say it has more than doubled in the past year or year and a half. The big trend is metering in buildings for multiple purposes at the same time. With the complexity of energy these days, and the growth in smart meters, it’s made energy more complicated and more confusing.” The drawback is that solid-state power electronics are still expensive. “These things are still five to 10 times more expensive than a traditional circuit breaker,” DeBoer said. “The incremental value, though, is that we’re seeing healthy year-over-year cost reductions, like you’re seeing in the semiconductor world.” Join us at Grid Edge World Forum this year. We'll have three days of sessions that address virtually all facets of the grid edge. We'll have the most influential executives, entrepreneurs and analysts from across the energy sector to meet during unparalleled networking opportunities and exhibition. Come join the audience of global utilities, emerging start-ups, and fast growing industries like EVs and customer energy management. Learn more here.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO, Calif., May 1, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has named Rob Chapman as vice president of Energy and Environment, the sector that provides global thought leadership to shape a sustainable future for electricity. The appointment is effective May 1, and he will report to Arshad Mansoor, senior vice president of Research & Development. Chapman will oversee science and technology research that addresses environmental, health, and economic issues related to the generation, delivery, and use of electricity. The sector's research focuses on air, land, water and energy challenges, and it informs public policy, enables sustainable practices, and improves occupational health and safety in the industry. He succeeds Anda Ray, who is senior vice president of External Relations and Technical Resources and Chief Sustainability Officer, where she leads member and stakeholder relations, international engagement, government affairs, strategic marketing and communications, laboratories, corporate safety, and corporate social responsibility. Chapman joined EPRI in 1999 as the director of North American Technical Advisory Services and was named vice president of Member & Technical Services in 2006. Prior to his time at EPRI, he was director of Western Sales for PG &E Energy Services where he led efforts to establish premium power services for technology companies in the Silicon Valley region. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and has completed executive business courses at the University of Chicago. About EPRI: The Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (EPRI, www.epri.com) conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. An independent, nonprofit organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, affordability, health, safety and the environment. EPRI's members represent approximately 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to more than 30 countries. EPRI's principal offices and laboratories are located in Palo Alto, Calif.; Charlotte, N.Car.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Lenox, Mass.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO, Calif., May 1, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has named Rob Chapman as vice president of Energy and Environment, the sector that provides global thought leadership to shape a sustainable future for electricity. The appointment is effective May 1, and he will report to Arshad Mansoor, senior vice president of Research & Development. Chapman will oversee science and technology research that addresses environmental, health, and economic issues related to the generation, delivery, and use of electricity. The sector's research focuses on air, land, water and energy challenges, and it informs public policy, enables sustainable practices, and improves occupational health and safety in the industry. He succeeds Anda Ray, who is senior vice president of External Relations and Technical Resources and Chief Sustainability Officer, where she leads member and stakeholder relations, international engagement, government affairs, strategic marketing and communications, laboratories, corporate safety, and corporate social responsibility. Chapman joined EPRI in 1999 as the director of North American Technical Advisory Services and was named vice president of Member & Technical Services in 2006. Prior to his time at EPRI, he was director of Western Sales for PG &E Energy Services where he led efforts to establish premium power services for technology companies in the Silicon Valley region. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and has completed executive business courses at the University of Chicago. About EPRI: The Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (EPRI, www.epri.com) conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. An independent, nonprofit organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, affordability, health, safety and the environment. EPRI's members represent approximately 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to more than 30 countries. EPRI's principal offices and laboratories are located in Palo Alto, Calif.; Charlotte, N.Car.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Lenox, Mass.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO, Calif., May 1, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has named Rob Chapman as vice president of Energy and Environment, the sector that provides global thought leadership to shape a sustainable future for electricity. The appointment is effective May 1, and he will report to Arshad Mansoor, senior vice president of Research & Development. Chapman will oversee science and technology research that addresses environmental, health, and economic issues related to the generation, delivery, and use of electricity. The sector's research focuses on air, land, water and energy challenges, and it informs public policy, enables sustainable practices, and improves occupational health and safety in the industry. He succeeds Anda Ray, who is senior vice president of External Relations and Technical Resources and Chief Sustainability Officer, where she leads member and stakeholder relations, international engagement, government affairs, strategic marketing and communications, laboratories, corporate safety, and corporate social responsibility. Chapman joined EPRI in 1999 as the director of North American Technical Advisory Services and was named vice president of Member & Technical Services in 2006. Prior to his time at EPRI, he was director of Western Sales for PG &E; Energy Services where he led efforts to establish premium power services for technology companies in the Silicon Valley region. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and has completed executive business courses at the University of Chicago. About EPRI: The Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (EPRI, www.epri.com) conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. An independent, nonprofit organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, affordability, health, safety and the environment. EPRI's members represent approximately 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to more than 30 countries. EPRI's principal offices and laboratories are located in Palo Alto, Calif.; Charlotte, N.Car.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Lenox, Mass.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

PALO ALTO, Calif., May 1, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has named Rob Chapman as vice president of Energy and Environment, the sector that provides global thought leadership to shape a sustainable future for electricity. The appointment is effective May 1, and he will report to Arshad Mansoor, senior vice president of Research & Development. Chapman will oversee science and technology research that addresses environmental, health, and economic issues related to the generation, delivery, and use of electricity. The sector's research focuses on air, land, water and energy challenges, and it informs public policy, enables sustainable practices, and improves occupational health and safety in the industry. He succeeds Anda Ray, who is senior vice president of External Relations and Technical Resources and Chief Sustainability Officer, where she leads member and stakeholder relations, international engagement, government affairs, strategic marketing and communications, laboratories, corporate safety, and corporate social responsibility. Chapman joined EPRI in 1999 as the director of North American Technical Advisory Services and was named vice president of Member & Technical Services in 2006. Prior to his time at EPRI, he was director of Western Sales for PG &E Energy Services where he led efforts to establish premium power services for technology companies in the Silicon Valley region. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and has completed executive business courses at the University of Chicago. About EPRI: The Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. (EPRI, www.epri.com) conducts research and development relating to the generation, delivery and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. An independent, nonprofit organization, EPRI brings together its scientists and engineers as well as experts from academia and industry to help address challenges in electricity, including reliability, efficiency, affordability, health, safety and the environment. EPRI's members represent approximately 90 percent of the electricity generated and delivered in the United States, and international participation extends to more than 30 countries. EPRI's principal offices and laboratories are located in Palo Alto, Calif.; Charlotte, N.Car.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Lenox, Mass.


Parker J.,EPRI
International Journal of Pressure Vessels and Piping | Year: 2014

In Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic steels control of both composition and heat treatment of the parent steel is necessary to avoid producing components which have properties below the minimum expected by applicable codes. The degree of tempering involved in manufacture will modify the material hardness. While under most conditions hardness is reduced by tempering, exceeding the AC1 temperature can lead to an increase in hardness. In this heat treatment the properties will be relatively poor even though the measured hardness may be apparently acceptable. Thus, care should be exercised in imposing an acceptance test of components based on simple hardness alone.Differences in parent material heat treatment and composition apparently have remarkably little influence on the creep life of the heat affect zone (HAZ). Thus, Type IV cracking in the fine grained or intercritically heat treated regions of the HAZ does not appear to directly depend on the strength of the base steel. This form of in-service damage is relatively difficult to detect using traditional methods of non-destructive testing. Moreover, since repeated heat treatment leads to over tempering and a degradation of properties, specific procedures for making and then lifing repair welds are required. The present paper summarizes examples of damage and discusses best option repairs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Rose S.K.,EPRI
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change | Year: 2012

Estimates of the marginal value of carbon dioxide-the social cost of carbon (SCC)-were recently adopted by both the U.S. and U.K. Governments in order to satisfy requirements to value estimated greenhouse gas (GHG) changes of new federal regulations. However, the development and use of SCC estimates comes with significant challenges and controversial decisions. This paper summarizes the key issues and then derives guidance for developing, selecting, and applying the estimates that follows from the fundamental scientific nature and economic principles associated with GHGs and climate change, as well as an understanding of the state of the art for estimating the SCC. The paper evaluates recent estimates in light of the guidance and finds the estimates inconsistent with the guidance in a number of significant areas. The paper also differentiates SCC policy applications in terms of policies with incremental versus nonincremental implications for global GHGs, and identifies serious issues for application of the SCC in setting and evaluating climate policy targets. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.


Short T.A.,EPRI
IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid | Year: 2013

Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) offers utilities new ways to model and analyze distribution circuits. Results from two circuits introduce a new method to identify phasing of transformers and single-phase taps using voltage and kilowatt-hour measurements from AMI. In addition to phase identification, we show how to use the same approach to create or check meter-to-transformer mappings. These algorithms are based on linear regression and basic voltage drop relationships. With this approach, secondary connectivity and impedance models can be auto generated. In addition, detection of unmetered load appears possible. Also demonstrated is use of AMI to estimate primary-side voltage profiles. © 2010-2012 IEEE.


Adapa R.,EPRI
IEEE Power and Energy Magazine | Year: 2012

Developed to meet a combination of technical and economic considerations, high-voltage dc (HV dc) was launched in 1954 with the first commercial transmission link between the island of Gotland and the Swedish mainland. Since then, HV dc technology has advanced dramatically, and more than 100 HV dc transmission systems have been installed around the world. © 2003-2012 IEEE.


Trautz R.C.,EPRI
Environmental science & technology | Year: 2013

Capturing carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions from industrial sources and injecting the emissions deep underground in geologic formations is one method being considered to control CO(2) concentrations in the atmosphere. Sequestering CO(2) underground has its own set of environmental risks, including the potential migration of CO(2) out of the storage reservoir and resulting acidification and release of trace constituents in shallow groundwater. A field study involving the controlled release of groundwater containing dissolved CO(2) was initiated to investigate potential groundwater impacts. Dissolution of CO(2) in the groundwater resulted in a sustained and easily detected decrease of ~3 pH units. Several trace constituents, including As and Pb, remained below their respective detections limits and/or at background levels. Other constituents (Ba, Ca, Cr, Sr, Mg, Mn, and Fe) displayed a pulse response, consisting of an initial increase in concentration followed by either a return to background levels or slightly greater than background. This suggests a fast-release mechanism (desorption, exchange, and/or fast dissolution of small finite amounts of metals) concomitant in some cases with a slower release potentially involving different solid phases or mechanisms. Inorganic constituents regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency remained below their respective maximum contaminant levels throughout the experiment.

Loading EPRI collaborators
Loading EPRI collaborators