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Rosas-Carrasco O.,Institute Geriatria | Garcia-Pena C.,Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit | Sanchez-Garcia S.,Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit | Gutierrez-Robledo L.M.,Institute Geriatria | Juarez-Cedillo T.,Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit
Revista de Investigacion Clinica | Year: 2011

Background. The increase in drug-drug interactions (potential DDIs) is a consequence that older adults experience by high availability of prescription medications for an increasing variety of diseases. This increase in potential DDIs could be associated with mortality rate during hospitalization. Objective. To determine whether the association between the presence of Potential DDIs and mortality rate in hospitalized elderly and to describe the frequency of potential DDIs and characterize drugs. Material and methods. A retrospective research was performed by reviewing the medical records of patients 60 years and older who were admitted to a second-level care hospital. The Potential DDIs were identified through the Micromedex® program. Comorbidity was classified according to the Charlson Index (CCI). Other variables such as gender, age, number and type of drug, type of interaction, and duration of hospital stay were evaluated. Results. 505 patients were included, among whom the 62.77% presented at least one type of DDL We found that 15.25% of moderate interactions were due to the combined use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and loop diuretics. Among serious interactions, 14.92% occurred due to the combined use of fluroquinolones and hypoglycemic agents. The duration of stay and a high comorbidity score, the presence of three or more interactions and exposure time to the interaction, were independently associated with mortality rate. Conclusions. This work shows that the occurrence of potential DDIs in the hospital environment for the elderly population is frequent and may be implicated in the cause of death for these patients.


Garcia-Pena C.,Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit | Juarez-Cedillo T.,Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit | Cruz-Robles D.,Instituto Nacional Of Cardiologia Ignacio Chavez | Fragoso J.M.,Instituto Nacional Of Cardiologia Ignacio Chavez | And 5 more authors.
Psychiatric Genetics | Year: 2010

AIM: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) has been regarded as the principal susceptibility gene linked with Alzheimer's disease, also suggesting a relationship with depression in the elderly population. Thus, the purpose was to investigate the association of APOE polymorphisms with depression in elderly adults. Methods: APOE polymorphisms were determined in a Mexican population-based sample older than 60 years (n=1566) using 5′ exonuclease TaqMan genotyping assays. Results: The distribution of the APOE allele and genotype frequencies was similar in patients with and without depression. There was no significant association between the presence of alleles or genotypes and depression and anxiety (Short Anxiety Screening Test) considering several combinations of other features. However, patients with the APOE*4 allele presented more thinking and concentration impairment than those patients with the APOE*3 allele. Conclusion: Genetic variation at the APOE gene may contribute to some depressive symptoms in late-onset depression, rather than being a specific risk factor. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.


Cedro-Tanda A.,Pediatric Hospital | Cedro-Tanda A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Cordova-Solis A.,Pediatric Hospital | Cordova-Solis A.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | And 11 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: Breast cancer is a complex multifactorial genetic disease. Among other factors, race and, to an even greater extent, viruses are known to influence the development of this heterogeneous disease. It has been reported that MMTV-like (HMTV) gene sequences with a 90 to 98% homology to mouse mammary tumor virus are found in several populations with a prevalence range of 0 to 74%. In the Mexican population, 4.2% of patients with breast cancer exhibit the presence of HMTV (MMTV-like) sequences. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and current prevalence of retroviral HMTV (MMTV-like) sequences in breast cancer in Mexican women. Methods: We used nested PCR and real-time PCR with a TaqMan probe. As a positive control, we used the C3H MMTV strain inserted into pBR322 plasmid. To confirm that we had identified the HMTV sequences, we sequenced the amplicons and compared these sequences with those of MMTV and HMTV (GenBank AF033807 and AF346816). Results: A total of 12.4% of breast tumors were HMTV-positive, and 15.7% of the unaffected tissue samples from 458 patients were HMTV-positive. A total of 8.3% of the patients had both HMTV-positive tumor and adjacent tissues. The HMTV-positive samples presented 98% similarity to the reported HMTV sequence. Conclusions: These results confirm that the HMTV sequence is present in breast tumors and non-affected tissues in the Mexican population. HMTV should be considered a prominent causative agent of breast cancer. © 2014 Cedro-Tanda et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Sanchez-Garcia S.,Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit | Sanchez-Arenas R.,Disease Research Unit Neurological Specialist Hospital | Garcia-Pena C.,Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit | Rosas-Carrasco O.,National Mexican Institute on Aging | And 3 more authors.
Geriatrics and Gerontology International | Year: 2014

Aim: To estimate the prevalence of frailty phenotypes and their association with the sociodemographic characteristics, health state and the use of health services in the last 6 months among community-dwelling elderly in Mexico City. Methods: The present study included 1933 elderly individuals from Mexico City. We estimated the prevalence of the frailty phenotype based on Fried and Walston. Household interviews were carried out to collect information on sociodemographics (sex, age, education, marital status, live alone, paid job), health state (activities of daily living, cognitive function, depression, comorbidity, nutritional status) and the use of health services in the last 6 months. Results: The estimated prevalence of frailty was 15.7%, pre-frailty at 33.3% and non-frailty at 51.0%. The statistically relevant associations in the pre-frail elderly were female (OR 0.83), older age (OR 2.48), single (OR 1.03), living alone (OR 1.23), no paid work (OR 0.82), limitations in the basic activities of daily living (OR 2.11) and instrumental activities of daily living (OR 2.10), cognitive impairment (OR 1.49), depression symptoms (OR 3.82), underweight/malnourished (OR 1.89), overweight/obesity (OR 0.80), moderate comorbidity (OR 2.05), and use of health services (OR 1.04) using the non-frail phenotype as the comparison category. Frailly is associated with female (OR 1.05), older age (OR 10.32), less educated (OR 2.51), single OR 1.39), living alone (OR 0.86), no paid work (OR 1.16), limitations in the basic activities of daily living (OR 7.66) and instrumental activities of daily living (OR 8.42), cognitive impairment (OR 3.02), depression symptoms (OR 11.23), underweight/malnourished (OR 1.49), overweight/obesity (OR 0.49), moderate comorbidity (OR 3.55), and use of health services (OR 1.99) using the non-frail phenotype as the comparison category. Conclusions: The results suggest that older age, disability, comorbidity, cognitive impairment and depression could have an influence role in frailty. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

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