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News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Making the Desert Bloom – How Israel's Water Expertise is a Model for California and the World -- Congregation Emanu-El will host a special in-house conversation about Israel's world-renowned water expertise, and its relevance for California and the World. The event, being held in partnership with the Environmental Working Group of Congregation Emanu-El's Tzedek Council and co-sponsored by the American Technion Society, will feature, New York Times best-selling author of, and, co-founder and CEO of Epic CleanTec, and co-founder of the Israel-California Greentech Partnership: Thursday, March 23, 7:00 pm: Congregation Emanu-El, 2 Lake Street, San Francisco, CA 94118: http://www.emanuelsf.org/"Depending primarily on the weather for our water is dangerous, and the California drought made this painfully clear," said Tartakovsky. "I'm looking forward to my discussion with Seth and sharing how Israel itself overcame its own water scarcity, and how the Golden Gate and the Jewish State can work together on this important issue."Israel offers a story of inspiration for the climate challenges posing California. Facing a similar situation, Israeli leaders took the courageous decision to create a system immune to drought. "What we learn from Israel is that every country and region can have a secure water future," said Siegel. "California's drought and floods are two sides of the same coin of inadequate planning and vision. What is needed is an engaged, informed citizenry which can demand of its leaders forward-looking water policies and practices. I hope the dialogue with Aaron helps give the tools and impetus to the Emanu-El and Golden Gate community.""Follow the conversation on social media via #LetThereBeWater and #TechnionWater"Seth is the author of the New York Times bestseller. His essays on water and other issues have appeared in, the, and in leading publications in Europe and Asia.Seth is the Daniel M. Soref Senior Water Policy Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Freshwater Sciences. He is a Senior Advisor to Start-Up Nation Central, an Israeli non-profit that connects government, NGO and business leaders to the relevant people, companies and technologies in Israel. Seth is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.Aaron Tartakovsky is co-founder and CEO of Epic CleanTec, a green technology start-up that has introduced a revolutionary new technology into the on-site wastewater treatment market. Aaron previously served as director of business development and marketing for CB Engineers, a sustainability-focused mechanical, electrical, and plumbing design firm, where he ran its R&D division. Aaron is a graduate of Tufts University, magna cum laude, and received a master's degree in political science (security and diplomacy) from Tel Aviv University.Based in New York City and with a local office in Sunnyvale, CA, the American Technion Society (ATS) provides critical support to the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, ranked among the world's leading science and technology universities. ATS Donors have provided more than $2 billion since its inception in 1940. The ATS and its network of supporters across the U.S. provide funds for scholarships, fellowships, faculty recruitment and chairs, research, buildings, laboratories, classrooms and dormitories, and more. Its mission is to enable the Technion to be among the world's leading institutions improving the well-being of Israel and all humanity through leadership in science and technology. Learn more at www.ats.org.Rob Freedman/Byron Gordon Congregation Emanu-El 415-751-2535bgordon@emanuelsf.orgrfreedman@emanuelsf.org


News Article | March 18, 2016
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

Women who eat as much seafood as the FDA recommends for people who are pregnant — or who eat slightly more — may be exposing themselves to unsafe levels of mercury depending on the kinds of fish they’re eating, says a new study just published by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). The report calls for more detailed federal guidelines on what types of fish are safe, and in what quantities. But an industry group has already criticized the study. The National Fisheries Institute, a trade organization representing the seafood industry, released a statement Tuesday decrying the report’s “fear-mongering,” even as other academics supported its basic conclusions. Mercury contamination in the environment comes from a variety of sources, mainly industrial pollution. Mercury that makes it into water systems and eventually into the ocean can be consumed by small organisms and work its way up the food chain in larger and larger amounts, which is why it tends to exist in the highest levels in large, predatory fish — often the kinds of fish that people like to eat, such as certain species of tuna. In previous decades, nutritionists have recommended that pregnant women abstain from seafood entirely to avoid exposing their developing babies to harmful mercury. But in the past decade or so, “we’ve seen the nutritional science shift to say that there are benefits to eating seafood,” said the new report’s lead author Sonya Lunder, a senior analyst at the EWG, a nonprofit environmental group with a long history of working on the mercury issue. The most widely touted of these benefits is the prevalence of omega-3 fatty acids, which are considered essential for human health but can’t be made naturally by the body. There are three types of omega-3s, two of which are found mainly in seafood. Research has suggested that consuming these omega-3s during pregnancy can aid in a fetus’s development, which is the major reason nutritionists now generally give pregnant women a complex recommendation: consume a moderate amount of seafood, adhering to certain federal guidelines to create a safe level of mercury exposure. In 2014, the FDA and EPA jointly released a new draft set of guidelines to aid in just that. Overall, for pregnant women and some other groups, the guidelines recommend eating 8 to 12 ounces of a variety of fish each week, and list a number of healthy, low-mercury examples, including salmon, shrimp and light canned tuna, as well as four types of fish to avoid entirely: tilefish from the Gulf of Mexico, shark, swordfish and king mackerel. They also recommend limiting the consumption of albacore tuna to 6 ounces or less per week. But the EWG’s report suggests that may not be specific enough. A study of more than 250 women of childbearing age who ate approximately the amount of seafood recommended by the federal guidelines found that around 30 percent of them had higher mercury levels in their bodies than is considered safe by the EPA. On average, the participants were found to have mercury levels 11 times higher than those of a control group of women who ate seafood rarely or not at all (though the control group consisted of only 29 individuals). The results suggest that study participants may not be choosing the most optimal fish for low mercury and high omega-3 intake. The study estimated, for instance, that tuna accounted for about 40 percent of all the participants’ mercury intake — a result that may have been caused in part by the guidelines’ incomplete recommendations when it comes to tuna consumption, Lunder pointed out. The government recommends light canned tuna — which is usually composed of skipjack tuna — as a healthy seafood choice that’s low in mercury. However, canned tuna comes in many other varieties, some of which include different species with generally higher mercury concentrations. Canned white tuna, for instance, is usually made from albacore tuna, which can have mercury concentrations several times higher than skipjack. The importance of differentiating between the different types of canned tuna is not articulated in the guidelines. In fact, Lunder noted, when surveyed many of the study’s participants were unsure exactly what type of canned tuna they’d been eating. Additionally, participants reported eating many other forms of tuna, including tuna steaks and tuna sushi, which often are made from species with relatively high mercury contents. None of these are specifically addressed in the guidelines, either. In general, Lunder said, the EWG continues to support the recommendation that pregnant women consume more seafood. But, she added, “We think that those recommendations need to be paired with much more detailed information about moderate- and high-mercury species that would pose a risk if you eat them.” Other experts agree that better information needs to be included in the guidelines — it just needs to be done carefully. “I think that the recommendations that this group make are reasonable — the challenge is that there’s a trade-off in providing more information,” said Roxanne Karimi, a research scientist at Stony Brook University who has conducted similar research. “Overall, more information is good so that consumers can make decisions on their own, but it can also be confusing, and there’s a concern that consumers will be discouraged from eating fish altogether, even when there’s an overall benefit.” Sharon Sagiv, an assistant adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of California Berkeley, noted that the FDA/EPA guidelines already list some specific recommendations when it comes to which fish to avoid and which fish might be better choices. So one question is whether the participants in the study were unclear about some of these recommendations (for example, the recommendations on tuna) or did not strictly heed them. Lunder pointed out that strict adherence to the types of fish recommended was not a requirement for participation in the study, and indeed some women did report eating fish that the guidelines specifically warn against, such as swordfish. So the issue is not that the existing recommendations are wrong. Rather, the report urges more specific and detailed instructions to consumers that may make it less likely for women to misunderstand the guidelines. “FDA and EPA can put out these recommendations, but if they’re at all complicated in terms of their message that’s a problem because it means that women aren’t necessarily getting effective risk communication,” Sagiv said. Sagiv has conducted research on the effects of prenatal exposure to both mercury and fish consumption. A 2012 study she co-authored found that low-level prenatal mercury exposure was associated with a greater risk for ADHD behaviors in children, but fish consumption during pregnancy can actually protect against these behaviors. “These findings underscore the difficulties of balancing the benefits of fish with the detriments of low-level mercury in developing dietary recommendations in pregnancy,” she and her colleagues wrote in the paper — a conclusion that aligns closely with the EWG’s new report. The EWG’s study has not been received favorably by all, however. “Published peer-reviewed science that takes into account the befits of omega 3’s and the risks of mercury together…is accepted and understood as the gold standard,” the National Fisheries Institute’s statement says. “Consumers don’t eat fish with a side of mercury, studying it that way only works to further EWG’s agenda when they don’t agree with the avalanche of research that stands in contrast to the narrative they are pushing to the press.” Aside from the value of revamping the seafood guidelines, Lunder noted that the report highlights the continued need for policies aimed at reducing mercury pollution. In 2013, the U.S. was one of nearly 150 countries to ratify the Minamata Convention on Mercury, an international treaty aimed at reducing mercury emissions worldwide. The report calls for strong and effective implementation of the treaty. Such steps will be necessary to protect both the environment and human health, Lunden noted. “Since we’ve polluted nature’s perfect food, we now have to look to changing human habits and patterns in order to protect ourselves from these known toxins,” she said. And Sagiv echoed her sentiments. “If we didn’t have contaminated seafood, we wouldn’t have to advise women not to eat [certain types of] fish,” Sagiv said. “Unfortunately, we’re in an environment where we do have to worry about that, and that risk communication is really very important.”


News Article | January 8, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Cans of Campbell's brand soups are seen at the Safeway store in Wheaton, Maryland February 13, 2015. REUTERS/Gary Cameron More (Reuters) - Campbell Soup Co said it will label all its U.S. products for the presence of ingredients derived from genetically modified organisms, becoming the first major food company to respond to growing calls for more transparency about contents in food. The world's largest soup maker broke ranks with peers and said it supported the enactment of federal legislation for a single mandatory labeling standard for GMO-derived foods and a national standard for non-GMO claims made on food packaging. The company, which also makes Pepperidge Farm cookies and Prego pasta sauces, said it would withdraw from all efforts by groups opposing such measures. (bit.ly/1OeE1Md) Several activist groups have been pressuring food companies to be more transparent about the use of ingredients, especially GMO-derived ones, amid rising concerns about their effects on health and the environment. Several big companies such as PepsiCo Inc, Kellogg Co and Monsanto Co have resisted such calls and have spent millions of dollars to defeat GMO-labeling ballot measures in states such as Oregon, Colorado, Washington and California, saying it would add unnecessary costs. Monsanto Co said in a statement Friday that it sells seeds to farmers, and does not manufacture or sell food products from crops grown from those seeds. The six biggest agrochemical and biotech seed companies — Monsanto, Dupont, Dow AgroSciences, Bayer CropScience, BASF Plant Science and Syngenta AG — spent more than $21.5 million to help defeat a 2012 California proposition labeling proposition, according to state election data. However, in 2014, Vermont became the first U.S. state to pass a law requiring food companies to label GMOs on their products, which will come into effect in July. Pro-labeling groups such as Environmental Working Group (EWG) and Just Label It cheered Campbell's move. "We applaud Campbell's for supporting national, mandatory GMO labeling," Scott Faber, senior vice president of government affairs at EWG said. Advocacy group Just Label It said Campbell's move was a step closer to reaching the goal of a federally crafted national GMO labeling solution. Campbell said late on Thursday that if a federal solution is not achieved in some time, it was prepared to label all its U.S. products for the presence of ingredients that were derived from GMOs and would seek guidance from the FDA and approval by the USDA. The Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA), which represents more than 300 food companies opposed to mandatory GMO labeling, said it respected the rights of individual members to communicate with their customers in whatever manner they deem appropriate. However, the GMA said it was "imperative" that Congress acted immediately to prevent the expansion of a costly patchwork of state labeling laws that would ultimately hurt consumers who can least afford higher food prices. Kellogg and Pepsi were not immediately available to comment on Campbell's move. Campbell said in July that it would stop adding monosodium glutamate (MSG) to its condensed soups for children and use non-genetically modified ingredients sourced from American organic farms in its Campbell's organic soup line for kids. The company also said it would remove artificial colors and flavors from nearly all of its North American products by July 2018.


News Article | September 20, 2016
Site: news.yahoo.com

Tap water supplies for roughly 218 million Americans nationwide were found to have chromium-6, a carcinogenic chemical, at levels above California's public health goals, a new study found. The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit research and advocacy organization, analyzed more than 60,000 samples of drinking water taken from taps across the United States. Thousands of local water utilities gathered the samples from 2013 to 2015 as part of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) program. SEE ALSO: Coca-Cola says it 'replenished' all the water it used to make its soft drinks Over 75 percent of the water samples contained levels of chromium-6 above 0.02 parts per billion. That’s the threshold at or below which California state scientists say chromium-6 would pose a "negligible" cancer risk over a lifetime of consumption. "Chromium-6 is so widespread, in terms of its distribution across drinking water sources," David Andrews, a senior scientist at EWG, told Mashable. "I should be shocked by the findings of EWG's report, but I am not," Erin Brockovich, the crusading environmental legal clerk and inspiration for the 2000 film starring Julia Roberts, said in a statement Tuesday. Brockovich brought chromium-6 into the national spotlight in the 1990s after fighting a California power company that allegedly leaked the chemical into tap water supplies in Hinkley, California, sickening residents. The case was settled for $333 million. She said that EWG's findings were "nothing short of an outrage." But does the report mean that over two-thirds of the U.S. population could develop cancer from their drinking water? Chromium-6, or hexavalent chromium, naturally appears in some minerals, but it can also sneak into drinking water supplies through industrial pollution. The chemical is used to manufacture stainless steel, textiles, for anticorrosion coatings and in leather tanning. California's public health goal of 0.02 parts per billion effectively means that if a million people drank water with that level of chromium-6 every day for 70 years, one additional case of cancer would occur, according to the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA), which set the state's health target. Even so, "Water containing levels that exceed the public health goal can still be considered acceptable for consumption," Sam Delson, the office's deputy director for external and legislative affairs, said in an email. "The public health goal is not a boundary between a safe and dangerous level of chromium-6, and it is not considered the highest level that is safe to drink," he added. California established a public health goal in response to a handful of studies that showed chromium-6 can cause cancer in animals. A 2008 study by the National Toxicology Program, for instance, found that drinking water with chromium-6 caused cancer in lab rats and mice.  Scientists at OEHHA extrapolated from that research that ingesting even tiny amounts of chromium-6 could cause cancer in people.  In 2011, the office established the "very conservative" public health target of 0.02 parts per billion, which factored in the increased susceptibility of young children and other sensitive groups, Delson said. California's health target was designed to help inform California legislators as they crafted the nation's only state-specific legal limits for chromium-6 in drinking water.  The Golden State — the world's sixth largest economy — struck out on its own because a federal limit for chromium-6 does not exist. The EPA instead has a 25-year-old drinking water standard of 100 parts per billion for total chromium, which includes chromium-6 as well as chromium-3. "At a national level, we're still operating under an outdated standard that doesn't even address this particular chemical," Bill Walker, EWG's vice president, told Mashable.  "EPA's drinking water regulations lag behind science," he said. California's own state limit for chromium-6 is significantly higher than the public health target of 0.02 parts per billion. In 2014, legislators in that state adopted a "maximum contaminant level" of 10 parts per billion, a level that appeased the state's chemical companies but disappointed environmental groups, including EWG. "We don't believe that it's adequately protective of public health," Walker said of the 10-parts-per-billion state limit.  Still, the California standard for chromium-6 is ten times lower than what the federal standard is for both chromium-6 and chromium-3. Delson said that while the more conservative 0.02 parts per billion public health goal is based solely on health protection, the maximum contamination level must be set at a level that is technically and economically feasible for the state's utilities to meet. The EPA, for its part, is working to develop a risk assessment of chromium-6, which will include a comprehensive evaluation of the health effects associated with the chemical. The agency said it expects to release its draft risk assessment for public comment in 2017. The EPA ordered nearly 5,000 public water systems to collect water samples — the ones that EWG analyzed — to help paint a nationally representative picture of the occurrence of chromium-6 and total chromium in the nation's drinking water supplies. Regulators found that less than 2 percent of those roughly 5,000 systems had levels of chromium-6 exceeding California's standard of 10 parts per billion, the EPA told Mashable. Only one system exceeded the EPA's standard for total chromium. "Ensuring safe drinking water for all Americans is a top priority for EPA," the agency said in an email.


LA JOLLA, Calif., Oct. 27, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MyDx, Inc. (OTCQB:MYDX), a rapidly growing chemical detection company and makers of MyDx®, the first handheld chemical analyzer for consumers, today announced it has launched its OrganaDxTM single use sensor chip for the analysis of pesticides and heavy metals in cannabis, fruits and vegetables.  The Company today also released a commercial that will be aired to announce the launch of OrganaDx and increase overall exposure for the Company and the new product line.  The commercial can be seen by visiting the following link:  Launch of OrganaDx Commercial. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/89abcaa7-e284-4a07-a086-e52842d4ad96 OrganaDx: The Next Generation in Consumer Grade Cannabis and Food Safety Testing OrganaDx puts real-time, affordable analysis in the palms of consumers’ hands.  It enables consumers to detect pesticides or heavy metals in cannabis and food, ensuring that you and your family do not unknowingly consume dangerous cancer-causing toxins at unsafe levels. OrganaDx enables consumers to test cannabis, or cannabis vape oil, for the same pesticides and heavy metals. According to a report published by Smithsonian.com, “Tests also show that marijuana plants can draw in heavy metals from the soil in which they are grown, and concentrating THC can increase the amounts of heavy metals, pesticides or other substances that end up in a product.” The Company’s CannaDxTM Sensor chip enables consumers to test, analyze and evaluate cannabis for potency and composition of psychoactive, and non-psychoactive medicinal, chemical components. Its OrganaDx sensor now enables consumers to test cannabis for safety. The groundwater under any crop may be contaminated and many growers, both indoor and outdoor, use pesticides or fertilizers that contain dangerous toxins as the media routinely confirms. OrganaDx and the Rapidly Growing $6 Billion Cannabis Marketplace Current polling suggests California is likely to pass its recreational marijuana initiative (Proposition 64) in next month’s election. That, alone, will more than triple the number of U.S. residents living in states where they can buy or grow cannabis without a physician’s recommendation. A total 82 million US residents live in states that could relax rules on cannabis in about two weeks, most of which are expected to pass initiatives permitting recreational or medicinal cannabis. “Of our product family of four sensors, we launched the CannaDx sensor first,” MyDx Chairman and CEO Daniel R. Yazbeck explained. “Because few states require growers or dispensaries to test the cannabis they sell, the product quality is largely unregulated. This contrasts with water, food and air, all of which have multiple state and federal agencies regulating their quality and anyone that might affect it, although many see their track record as imperfect at best as Flint, Michigan amongst many other incidents exemplifies. Ultimately, it is up to the consumer to Trust & Verify® the safety of what they eat, drink and inhale. “In the cannabis marketplace, however, very few growers, dispensaries or producers of cannabis flower, distilled concentrate or oil for vape pens obtain and publish independent lab tests for their products potency or safety from poisonous toxins. Today, MyDx receives more inquiries about how to test cannabis for pesticides and heavy metals than it does for food and water combined. To its credit, the media routinely investigates and reports on the prevalence of pesticides and heavy metals in cannabis, especially in the popular THC oil/propellant commonly used in vape pens.” OrganaDx: $120 Billion TAM and Boost to MyDx Earnings Power Accordingly, MyDx is confident that consumers pairing the CannaDx and new OrganaDx sensors will drive sales of both products and the multi-use Analyzer. Offering three different Sensor chips enables MyDx customers to leverage the cost of the Analyzer by testing food, water, cannabis composition and cannabis/vape oil safety – all of which multiplies the Analyzer’s utility and value. Industry analysts project the global organic food and beverage market is expected to grow from $80 billion in 2013 to $162 billion by 2018 for a 15% Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR).1 Further, over 10% of fruits and vegetables sold in the U.S. are organic.2 MyDx’s next-generation OrganaDx technology will empower consumers with the ability to disrupt and increase the marketplace with consumer-based food testing. The OrganaDx Sensor chip will work interchangeably with the multi-use MyDx platform, and, along with CannaDxTM and AquaDxTM, is the third of its four different sensors. Its fourth sensor, AeroDxTM, is designed to measure air quality by monitoring the levels of certain harmful chemicals (VOC’s) in the surrounding environment.  AeroDx is also being programmed to test Cannabis oil for residual solvents.  It is currently in beta stage testing and slated for launch in the first half of 2017. In addition, MyDx plans to introduce new, digitized versions of its OrganaDx and AquaDx Single Use Sensors that will provide more advanced functionality and customer benefits. Details will be announced in preparation of its launch at a later time. Why OrganaDx? The Dirty Dozen Food testing is particularly important when buying non-organic produce that is known to be notoriously high in pesticides, commonly referred to as the “Dirty Dozen” (strawberries top the list). AquaDx tests raw fruits and vegetables for pesticides, heavy metals and other neurotoxic chemicals to the US Military Exposure Guideline (MEG) for safety. The single-use OrganaDx sensor provides a pass/fail report within six minutes, including an analysis of the toxins tested. Whether you are a consumer who wants to protect your family from foods containing dangerous levels of cancer causing chemicals, or a cannabis dispensary owner who wants to ensure you are not buying or selling contaminated cannabis or THC vape oil, MyDx encourages its customers to use its Analyzer as a primary screening tool. Customers receiving a “fail” test should send the tainted food or cannabis to a commercial laboratory for more granular analysis. The single-use OrganaDx sensor chips simply require pre-soaking the fruit or vegetable or cannabis in hot water for one minute to leach the chemicals into the water.  The concentrated sample of water with leached chemicals is then applied to the sensor chip with the dropper provided, which will report a PASS or FAIL within 6 minutes. Commenting on the OrganaDx launch, Mr. Yazbeck said, “Everyone eats fruits and vegetables. Here in the U.S., cancer rates have increased dramatically over the past 50 years and many scientists, researchers and experts, including the Environmental Working Group, have linked the toxic chemicals OrganaDx screens for, to cancer. Raising the stakes, children with developing brains and bodies are typically more at risk other major demographic groups. I live in San Diego, buy fruits and vegetables at local reputable grocers and farmers markets, and yet have purchased strawberries that have failed using our OrganaDx sensor which tested to be tainted with unsafe levels of carcinogens. It is important to spot-check all the fruits and vegetables for my family.” For an in-depth understanding of why these fruits and vegetables are on the list, and why it is important, please visit the highly respected Environmental Working Group’s recent update on its Dirty Dozen at www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary.php. The Next Generation of Consumer-Grade Cannabis and Food Quality Testing Even if you rigorously wash your produce, there is still a high likelihood that pesticides will have lingered on the surface or may have already seeped into that particular fruit or vegetable. Pesticides have been shown to cause a myriad of adverse effects in humans, including increasing the risk of cancer, impeding neurological development and function, adversely affecting developing fetuses, decreasing fertility, and more. It is, therefore, advisable to purchase organically grown produce and, when possible, to test for these pesticides. Our OrganaDx sensor will allow you to do just that, keeping you and your family safe. OrganaDx provides its users with a Total Toxicity ProfileTM (TTP), a proprietary rapid response measurement interpretation that reports a TTP of Pass or Fail based on the presence of neurotoxic chemicals in water at concentrations that exceed the US Military Exposure Guideline (MEG) for safety of drinking water (assuming 7-14 day exposure, 15L/day consumption, 70kg person) and are below the estimated Human Lethal Consumption (HLC) guideline. This test covers key organophosphate/carbamate pesticides and toxic heavy metals.  The OrganaDx sensor also detects the most common, highly poisonous Organophosphate Pesticides (such as Malathion, Diazinon and others) that have been linked to Cancer by the World Health Organization (see https://www.cdxlife.com/wp-content/uploads/MonographVolume112.pdf). Ordering OrganaDx A two-pack Pesticides & Heavy Metals OrganaDx single-use Sensor Kit can be purchased on the MyDx website for only $24.95. The Company anticipates launching new, digital multi-sensor bundled specials in December prior to the holidays. About MyDx, Inc. MyDx, Inc. (OTCQB:MYDX) is a chemical detection and sensor technology company based in San Diego, California whose mission is to help people Trust & Verify™ what they put into their minds and bodies. The Company developed MyDx, a patented, affordable portable analyzer that provides real-time chemical analysis and fits in the palm of the user’s hand. The multi-use MyDx analyzer leverages over a decade of established electronic nose technology to measure chemicals of interest. The Company owns a substantial and growing intellectual property portfolio of patents covering its technology. The MyDx CannaDxTM AquaDxTM and OrganaDxTM Sensors are now commercialized, and the AeroDx is next in line for early 2017. All Sensors will be compatible with a MyDx App that empowers consumers to test the chemical composition of everything they eat, drink and inhale. For more information, please visit www.cdxlife.com. Forward-Looking Statements This news release contains "forward-looking statements" as that term is defined in Section 27(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Statements may contain certain forward-looking statements pertaining to future anticipated or projected plans, performance and developments, as well as other statements relating to future operations and results. Any statements in this press release that are not statements of historical fact may be considered to be forward-looking statements. Words such as "may," "will," "expect," "believe," "anticipate," "estimate," "intends," "goal," "objective," "seek," "attempt," or variations of these or similar words, identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements by their nature are estimates of future results only and involve substantial risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to risks associated with the uncertainty of future financial results, additional financing requirements, development of new products, our ability to complete our product testing and launch our product commercially, the acceptance of our product in the marketplace, the uncertainty of the laws and regulations relating to cannabis, the impact of competitive products or pricing, technological changes, the effect of economic conditions and other uncertainties detailed from time to time in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, available at http://ir.cdxlife.com/all-sec-filings or www.sec.gov. The photo is also available at Newscom, www.newscom.com, and via AP PhotoExpress.


LA JOLLA, Calif., Oct. 27, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MyDx, Inc. (OTCQB:MYDX), a rapidly growing chemical detection company and makers of MyDx®, the first handheld chemical analyzer for consumers, today announced it has launched its OrganaDxTM single use sensor chip for the analysis of pesticides and heavy metals in cannabis, fruits and vegetables.  The Company today also released a commercial that will be aired to announce the launch of OrganaDx and increase overall exposure for the Company and the new product line.  The commercial can be seen by visiting the following link:  Launch of OrganaDx Commercial. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/89abcaa7-e284-4a07-a086-e52842d4ad96 OrganaDx: The Next Generation in Consumer Grade Cannabis and Food Safety Testing OrganaDx puts real-time, affordable analysis in the palms of consumers’ hands.  It enables consumers to detect pesticides or heavy metals in cannabis and food, ensuring that you and your family do not unknowingly consume dangerous cancer-causing toxins at unsafe levels. OrganaDx enables consumers to test cannabis, or cannabis vape oil, for the same pesticides and heavy metals. According to a report published by Smithsonian.com, “Tests also show that marijuana plants can draw in heavy metals from the soil in which they are grown, and concentrating THC can increase the amounts of heavy metals, pesticides or other substances that end up in a product.” The Company’s CannaDxTM Sensor chip enables consumers to test, analyze and evaluate cannabis for potency and composition of psychoactive, and non-psychoactive medicinal, chemical components. Its OrganaDx sensor now enables consumers to test cannabis for safety. The groundwater under any crop may be contaminated and many growers, both indoor and outdoor, use pesticides or fertilizers that contain dangerous toxins as the media routinely confirms. OrganaDx and the Rapidly Growing $6 Billion Cannabis Marketplace Current polling suggests California is likely to pass its recreational marijuana initiative (Proposition 64) in next month’s election. That, alone, will more than triple the number of U.S. residents living in states where they can buy or grow cannabis without a physician’s recommendation. A total 82 million US residents live in states that could relax rules on cannabis in about two weeks, most of which are expected to pass initiatives permitting recreational or medicinal cannabis. “Of our product family of four sensors, we launched the CannaDx sensor first,” MyDx Chairman and CEO Daniel R. Yazbeck explained. “Because few states require growers or dispensaries to test the cannabis they sell, the product quality is largely unregulated. This contrasts with water, food and air, all of which have multiple state and federal agencies regulating their quality and anyone that might affect it, although many see their track record as imperfect at best as Flint, Michigan amongst many other incidents exemplifies. Ultimately, it is up to the consumer to Trust & Verify® the safety of what they eat, drink and inhale. “In the cannabis marketplace, however, very few growers, dispensaries or producers of cannabis flower, distilled concentrate or oil for vape pens obtain and publish independent lab tests for their products potency or safety from poisonous toxins. Today, MyDx receives more inquiries about how to test cannabis for pesticides and heavy metals than it does for food and water combined. To its credit, the media routinely investigates and reports on the prevalence of pesticides and heavy metals in cannabis, especially in the popular THC oil/propellant commonly used in vape pens.” OrganaDx: $120 Billion TAM and Boost to MyDx Earnings Power Accordingly, MyDx is confident that consumers pairing the CannaDx and new OrganaDx sensors will drive sales of both products and the multi-use Analyzer. Offering three different Sensor chips enables MyDx customers to leverage the cost of the Analyzer by testing food, water, cannabis composition and cannabis/vape oil safety – all of which multiplies the Analyzer’s utility and value. Industry analysts project the global organic food and beverage market is expected to grow from $80 billion in 2013 to $162 billion by 2018 for a 15% Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR).1 Further, over 10% of fruits and vegetables sold in the U.S. are organic.2 MyDx’s next-generation OrganaDx technology will empower consumers with the ability to disrupt and increase the marketplace with consumer-based food testing. The OrganaDx Sensor chip will work interchangeably with the multi-use MyDx platform, and, along with CannaDxTM and AquaDxTM, is the third of its four different sensors. Its fourth sensor, AeroDxTM, is designed to measure air quality by monitoring the levels of certain harmful chemicals (VOC’s) in the surrounding environment.  AeroDx is also being programmed to test Cannabis oil for residual solvents.  It is currently in beta stage testing and slated for launch in the first half of 2017. In addition, MyDx plans to introduce new, digitized versions of its OrganaDx and AquaDx Single Use Sensors that will provide more advanced functionality and customer benefits. Details will be announced in preparation of its launch at a later time. Why OrganaDx? The Dirty Dozen Food testing is particularly important when buying non-organic produce that is known to be notoriously high in pesticides, commonly referred to as the “Dirty Dozen” (strawberries top the list). AquaDx tests raw fruits and vegetables for pesticides, heavy metals and other neurotoxic chemicals to the US Military Exposure Guideline (MEG) for safety. The single-use OrganaDx sensor provides a pass/fail report within six minutes, including an analysis of the toxins tested. Whether you are a consumer who wants to protect your family from foods containing dangerous levels of cancer causing chemicals, or a cannabis dispensary owner who wants to ensure you are not buying or selling contaminated cannabis or THC vape oil, MyDx encourages its customers to use its Analyzer as a primary screening tool. Customers receiving a “fail” test should send the tainted food or cannabis to a commercial laboratory for more granular analysis. The single-use OrganaDx sensor chips simply require pre-soaking the fruit or vegetable or cannabis in hot water for one minute to leach the chemicals into the water.  The concentrated sample of water with leached chemicals is then applied to the sensor chip with the dropper provided, which will report a PASS or FAIL within 6 minutes. Commenting on the OrganaDx launch, Mr. Yazbeck said, “Everyone eats fruits and vegetables. Here in the U.S., cancer rates have increased dramatically over the past 50 years and many scientists, researchers and experts, including the Environmental Working Group, have linked the toxic chemicals OrganaDx screens for, to cancer. Raising the stakes, children with developing brains and bodies are typically more at risk other major demographic groups. I live in San Diego, buy fruits and vegetables at local reputable grocers and farmers markets, and yet have purchased strawberries that have failed using our OrganaDx sensor which tested to be tainted with unsafe levels of carcinogens. It is important to spot-check all the fruits and vegetables for my family.” For an in-depth understanding of why these fruits and vegetables are on the list, and why it is important, please visit the highly respected Environmental Working Group’s recent update on its Dirty Dozen at www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary.php. The Next Generation of Consumer-Grade Cannabis and Food Quality Testing Even if you rigorously wash your produce, there is still a high likelihood that pesticides will have lingered on the surface or may have already seeped into that particular fruit or vegetable. Pesticides have been shown to cause a myriad of adverse effects in humans, including increasing the risk of cancer, impeding neurological development and function, adversely affecting developing fetuses, decreasing fertility, and more. It is, therefore, advisable to purchase organically grown produce and, when possible, to test for these pesticides. Our OrganaDx sensor will allow you to do just that, keeping you and your family safe. OrganaDx provides its users with a Total Toxicity ProfileTM (TTP), a proprietary rapid response measurement interpretation that reports a TTP of Pass or Fail based on the presence of neurotoxic chemicals in water at concentrations that exceed the US Military Exposure Guideline (MEG) for safety of drinking water (assuming 7-14 day exposure, 15L/day consumption, 70kg person) and are below the estimated Human Lethal Consumption (HLC) guideline. This test covers key organophosphate/carbamate pesticides and toxic heavy metals.  The OrganaDx sensor also detects the most common, highly poisonous Organophosphate Pesticides (such as Malathion, Diazinon and others) that have been linked to Cancer by the World Health Organization (see https://www.cdxlife.com/wp-content/uploads/MonographVolume112.pdf). Ordering OrganaDx A two-pack Pesticides & Heavy Metals OrganaDx single-use Sensor Kit can be purchased on the MyDx website for only $24.95. The Company anticipates launching new, digital multi-sensor bundled specials in December prior to the holidays. About MyDx, Inc. MyDx, Inc. (OTCQB:MYDX) is a chemical detection and sensor technology company based in San Diego, California whose mission is to help people Trust & Verify™ what they put into their minds and bodies. The Company developed MyDx, a patented, affordable portable analyzer that provides real-time chemical analysis and fits in the palm of the user’s hand. The multi-use MyDx analyzer leverages over a decade of established electronic nose technology to measure chemicals of interest. The Company owns a substantial and growing intellectual property portfolio of patents covering its technology. The MyDx CannaDxTM AquaDxTM and OrganaDxTM Sensors are now commercialized, and the AeroDx is next in line for early 2017. All Sensors will be compatible with a MyDx App that empowers consumers to test the chemical composition of everything they eat, drink and inhale. For more information, please visit www.cdxlife.com. Forward-Looking Statements This news release contains "forward-looking statements" as that term is defined in Section 27(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Statements may contain certain forward-looking statements pertaining to future anticipated or projected plans, performance and developments, as well as other statements relating to future operations and results. Any statements in this press release that are not statements of historical fact may be considered to be forward-looking statements. Words such as "may," "will," "expect," "believe," "anticipate," "estimate," "intends," "goal," "objective," "seek," "attempt," or variations of these or similar words, identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements by their nature are estimates of future results only and involve substantial risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to risks associated with the uncertainty of future financial results, additional financing requirements, development of new products, our ability to complete our product testing and launch our product commercially, the acceptance of our product in the marketplace, the uncertainty of the laws and regulations relating to cannabis, the impact of competitive products or pricing, technological changes, the effect of economic conditions and other uncertainties detailed from time to time in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, available at http://ir.cdxlife.com/all-sec-filings or www.sec.gov. The photo is also available at Newscom, www.newscom.com, and via AP PhotoExpress.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.treehugger.com

When sunscreen chemicals wash off beach-goers, they bleach coral, stunt its growth, and sometimes kill it outright. If you’re heading to Hawaii, or any other tropical paradise, to soak up the sun this winter, you might want to leave the sunscreen behind. It sounds counterintuitive after years of being told to slather on sunscreen to protect our skin from dangerous UV rays, but now research is showing that human use of sunscreen could be seriously damaging tropical coral reefs. Senator Will Espero presented a bill to the state congress on January 20 that would ban sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate (except under medical prescriptions) in Hawaii. Espero argued that a ban is crucial to maintaining the health of coral reefs – an tourist attraction on which Hawaii relies. Sunscreens use filters, either chemical or mineral, to block out the sun’s radiation. The chemical filters are most damaging, washing off the skin into the water while swimming, surfing, spearfishing, or even using a beach shower. Researchers have measured oxybenzone in Hawaiian waters at concentrations that are 30 times higher than the level considered safe for corals. According to Hawaii’s Department of Land and Natural Resources: Says Craig Downs of Haereticus Environmental Laboratory in Virginia, whose research on stunted coral growth has heavily influenced Espero's bill: This problem is not unique to Hawaii. Approximately 80 percent of the corals in the Caribbean Sea have died over the past 40 years. While there are many compounding factors, such as temperature anomalies, overfishing, coral predators, coastal runoffs, and pollution from cruise ships and other vessels that affect coral health, the fact that an estimated 14,000 tons of sunscreen wash off annually into the world’s oceans is a serious matter. Not surprisingly, Espero has met resistance from sunscreen manufacturers, such as L'Oréal, which say the evidence is not yet strong enough to justify a ban; but Espero insists the public support is there. Scientific American quotes him: If you’re wondering how not to burn in the sun, check out the Environmental Working Group’s 2016 guide to safe sunscreens, and consider its advice: “Sunscreen should be your last resort.” Use clothing (long-sleeved shirts or special UV blocking clothes), shade, sunglasses, and careful timing to minimize exposure to sunshine.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans suspended Senate committee rules Thursday to muscle President Donald Trump's pick to lead the Environmental Protection Agency toward confirmation after Democrats boycotted a vote. It was the latest sign of political hostilities on Capitol Hill as Senate Democrats used parliamentary procedure to delay votes on some of Trump's Cabinet nominees and Republicans used their slim Senate majority to advance and approve them. Also Thursday, two Senate committees voted along party lines to send Trump's nominee to lead the White House budget office, South Carolina GOP Rep. Mick Mulvaney, to the full Senate for a vote. As the scheduled meeting to discuss EPA nominee Scott Pruitt was gaveled to order, the seats reserved for the 10 Democrats on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee were empty for the second consecutive day. Committee rules required that at least two members of the minority party be present for a vote to be held. The 11 Republicans voted unanimously to temporarily suspend those rules and then voted again to advance the nomination of Pruitt, the state attorney general of Oklahoma. Committee chairman John Barrasso accused the absent Democrats of engaging in delay and obstruction. "It is unprecedented for the minority to delay an EPA administrator for an incoming president to this extent," Barrasso said. The Wyoming Republican then echoed President Barack Obama's famous 2009 statement to GOP leaders that "elections have consequences." "The people spoke and now it is time to set up a functioning government," Barrasso said of the November election. "That includes a functioning EPA." Despite the rhetoric from committee Republicans, the Democrats appeared to have borrowed directly from their opponents' playbook. In 2013, GOP members of the same committee boycotted a similar committee meeting on Gina McCarthy, Obama's then-nominee for EPA administrator. McCarthy was eventually approved by the Senate, serving in the post until Trump's inauguration last month. Barrasso has said that is not an "apples-to-apples" comparison since Obama was not then a new, first-term president building out his team. Democratic members of the committee said this week the boycott was necessary because Pruitt has refused to fully respond to requests for additional information. Democrats did attend meetings of the Senate budget and homeland security committees Thursday as Republicans voted to approve Mulvaney, Trump's nominee to lead the White House Budget Office, for a vote by the full Senate. The move came over the opposition of Democrats who warn of his support for cutting rising costs of Medicare and increasing the age for claiming Social Security benefits. Mulvaney was among tea party lawmakers who backed a government shutdown in 2013 in an attempt to block the Affordable Care Act from taking place. In 2011, he was among those against increasing the government's borrowing cap. Mulvaney easily sidestepped a controversy in which he failed to pay payroll taxes on a nanny he employed from 2000-2004. While Pruitt's nomination to lead EPA has been praised by Republicans and the fossil fuel industry, Democrats and environmental groups said his confirmation would be a disaster. "During the campaign, President Trump pledged to dismantle the EPA," said Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group. "In Scott Pruitt, he found just the man to carry out his vision." In his current position as Oklahoma's state attorney general, Pruitt has frequently sued the agency he hopes to lead, including filing a multistate lawsuit opposing the Obama administration's plan to limit planet-warming carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. Pruitt also sued over the EPA's recent expansion of water bodies regulated under the Clean Water Act. It has been opposed by industries that would be forced to clean up polluted wastewater. Like Trump, the 48-year-old Republican has previously cast doubt on the extensive body of scientific evidence showing that the planet is warming and that man-made carbon emissions are to blame. Pressed by Democrats during his Senate confirmation hearing, however, Pruitt said he disagreed with Trump's earlier claims that global warming is a hoax created by the Chinese to harm the economic competitiveness of the U.S.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.sej.org

"Are the many hog and poultry farms of eastern North Carolina creating 'fields of filth,' as two groups of environmental activists put it last summer? And if they are, what happens when a hurricane comes along and dumps a foot and a half of water on them? The two groups, Environmental Working Group and Waterkeeper Alliance, just issued a partial answer. It's a report filled with overhead photos taken in early October, in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew. They show flooded poultry barns and "lagoons" filled with swine manure, spilling animal waste into nearby waterways. According to the two groups, the flood waters partially submerged 10 pig farms with 39 barns, 26 large chicken-raising operations with 102 barns, and 14 manure lagoons. They say that flood waters inevitably carried large amounts of animal waste downstream and out to sea, "putting waterways, drinking water sources and public health at risk.""


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee confirmation hearing on his nomination to be administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, U.S., January 18, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Senate committee suspended rules on Thursday to approve U.S. President Donald Trump's controversial choice to lead the Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday, amid a boycott of his nomination by the panel's Democratic members. John Barrasso, chair of the Senate's environment and public works committee, said the panel would "suspend several rules" temporarily to approve the nomination of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt as EPA administrator. Democrats on the committee boycotted Wednesday's meeting to approve Pruitt, saying that he doubts the science of climate change and has too many conflicts of interest with the companies he would be charged with regulating. The full Senate will now vote on Pruitt's nomination. The date for that has not yet been confirmed, but with Republicans holding a majority in the Senate, the nomination will likely be approved. Barrasso justified the move by saying that Pruitt, who sued the EPA 14 times as Oklahoma's top attorney, reflects the agenda of the president who won the 2016 election. "Elections have consequences and a new president is entitled to put in place people who advance his agenda," he said. Environmental groups, which have strongly criticized the choice of Pruitt, raised concerns that the nomination was pushed through to the full Senate. "If he is approved by the full Senate, he will start on day one as the worst EPA administrator in history," said Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group.

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