Cincinnati, OH, United States
Cincinnati, OH, United States

Environmental Quality Management, Inc. is an environmental engineering and remediation company headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio that has been active in providing environmental remediation support in response to terrorist attacks, the space shuttle disaster, superfund site cleanup, hazardous chemical spills and natural disasters. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.92K | Year: 2010

This will facilitate the development of remedial approaches for existing facilities and assist in planning new facilities, logistics, and procedures to protect the environment without impairing critical mission functionality. The commercial application will include software distribution and updates.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.97K | Year: 2010

This will facilitate the development of remedial approaches for existing facilities and assist in planning new facilities, logistics, and procedures to protect the environment without impairing critical mission functionality. The commercial application will include software distribution and updates.


Yoon S.,Environmental Quality Management | Nakada N.,Environmental Quality Management | Tanaka H.,Environmental Quality Management
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2011

N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a potent carcinogen that is formed during disinfection by chlorination or ozonation in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). At present, little is known about the occurrence and fate of NDMA and its formation potential (FP) during wastewater treatment. We investigated the fate of NDMA and NDMA FP in 12 WWTPs. NDMA occurred in the influents at a concentration ranging from below the limit of quantification (LOQ <10. ng/L) to 80. ng/L, and in the final discharges from below the LOQ to 73. ng/L. In three WWTPs located in industrial areas, the influent had a high NDMA FP (up to 8230. ng/L). The rate of NDMA FP reduction from influent to secondary effluent varied between 85 and 98%, regardless of treatment process. The rate of NDMA removal is due more to the influent properties than to the type of biological treatment process. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Ghosh G.C.,Environmental Quality Management | Nakada N.,Environmental Quality Management | Yamashita N.,Environmental Quality Management | Tanaka H.,Environmental Quality Management
Environmental Health Perspectives | Year: 2010

Background: Oseltamivir phosphate (OP; Tamiflu) is a prodrug of the anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) and has been developed for the treatment and prevention of both A and B strains of influenza. The recent increase in OP resistance in influenza A virus (H1N1; commonlly called "swine flu") has raised questions about the widespread use of Tamiflu in seasonal epidemics and the potential ecotoxicologic risk associated with its use in the event of a pandemic. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to develop an analytical method for quantitative determination of OC in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent and receiving river water, and to investigate the occurrence of OC in STP effluent and river water in Japan during a seasonal flu outbreak. Methods: We developed an analytical method based on solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry. Using this method, we analyzed samples from three sampling campaigns conducted during the 2008-2009 flu season in Kyoto City, Japan. Results: The highest concentration of OC detected in STP discharge was 293.3 ng/L from a conventional activated-sludge - based STP; however, we detected only 37.9 ng/L from an advanced STP with ozonation as a tertiary treatment. In the receiving river water samples, we detected 6.6-190.2 ng/L OC, during the peak of the flu season. Conclusion: OC is present in STP effluent and river water only during the flu season. Ozonation as tertiary treatment in STP will substantially reduce the OC load in STP effluent during an influenza epidemic or pandemic.


Narumiya M.,Environmental Quality Management | Nakada N.,Environmental Quality Management | Yamashita N.,Environmental Quality Management | Tanaka H.,Environmental Quality Management
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2013

The fate and removal of 48 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) during anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge were investigated in four full-scale sewage treatment plants (STPs). We measured concentrations in both the liquid and solid phases of the sludge to compare the distribution ratios (Kd) between phases before and after digestion. The results showed changes in Kd values of PPCPs with carboxyl or amino functional groups, probably due to a shift of dissociation equilibrium with the increase in pH. Sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim were almost completely degraded (>90%); triclosan, triclocarban, and ofloxacin were moderately degraded (around 30-50%); but carbamazepine was not eliminated. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows (i) the occurrence and removal of several tens of PPCPs by anaerobic sludge digestion in full-scale municipal STPs and (ii) the change of distribution between the liquid and solid phases during digestion. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Yoon S.,Environmental Quality Management | Nakada N.,Environmental Quality Management | Tanaka H.,Environmental Quality Management
Talanta | Year: 2012

We developed a methodology for the separation, identification, and quantification of eight N-nitrosamines. For a range of wastewater samples, including raw sewage and final-discharge wastewater, the methodology, which was based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) and a purification technique followed by analysis using a gas chromatograph equipped with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, gave effective separation of the targeted compounds. The limits of detection of this method for N-nitrosamines in wastewaters ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 ng L -1 and the limits of quantification ranged from 0.4 to 3.3 ng L -1. As a result of preliminary recovery testing, we decided on a combination of two types of sorbent cartridges for SPE - one was aminoprophyl for sample purification and the other was activated charcoal for analyte concentration - that gave excellent recovery rates (98% to 152%) of three deuterided nitrosamines (surrogates). Using this combination of SPE, internal surrogates, and an injection surrogate, we obtained good recovery rates (80% to 131%) with low relative standard deviations (1% to 14%, n=3) for eight N-nitrosamines in all samples of influent, secondary effluent, and final discharge. We applied the newly developed pre-treatment method to an influent wastewater samples. All of the N-nitrosamines except two (NMEA and NDPA) were detected in the influent sample, at 1 to 1057 ng L -1. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Patent
Environmental Quality Management | Date: 2010-08-16

The present invention describes substrates (feedstocks) used in the production of fuel ethanol and describes the process by which the alcohol is produced. The inventors process animal, vegetable, industrial food waste or a mixture of wastes in a process involving saccharification and fermentation reactions to produce a mixture of fuel ethanol water and carbon-dioxide, which is subsequently separated to recover 95 vol. % ethanol.


A sampling apparatus includes a housing defining a test chamber with an opening for contacting a test surface to expose at least a portion the test surface to the test chamber. A movable agitator within the test chamber contacts the test surface and agitates the test surface to release material from the test surface. The apparatus further includes an inlet and an outlet communicating with the test chamber and defining an air flow path through the chamber. At least one sample cassette may be supported near the outlet to collect a sample from the air flow, including material released from the surface into the test chamber.


News Article | July 13, 2015
Site: www.bloomberg.com

Coal is having a hard time lately. U.S. power plants are switching to natural gas, environmental restrictions are kicking in, and the industry is being derided as the world's No. 1 climate criminal. Prices have crashed, sure, but for a real sense of coal's diminishing prospects, check out what's happening in the bond market. Bonds are where coal companies turn to raise money for such things as new mines and environmental cleanups. But investors are increasingly reluctant to lend to them. Coal bond prices tumbled 17 percent in the second quarter, according to an analysis by Bloomberg Intelligence. It's the fourth consecutive quarter of price declines and the worst performance of any industry group by a long shot. Bonds fluctuate less than stocks, because the payoff is fixed and pretty much guaranteed as long as the borrower remains solvent. A 17 percent decline is huge, and it happened at a time when other energy bonds—oil and gas—were rising. Three of America's biggest coal producers had the worst-performing bonds for the quarter: Coal powered the industrial revolution and helped lift much of humanity out of poverty, but its glory days have reached an end. Here are four of the biggest pressures facing the industry: About 17 percent of U.S. coal-fired power generation will disappear over the next few years, according to an analysis by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF). Obstacles include age, the abundance of cheap natural gas, and new EPA rules to cut pollution. Here's a great visual breakdown of what's happening to U.S. coal power. The map shows coal plants in 2010 that may be headed for retirement. Blue circles represent plants that will be shuttered by 2020, while yellow will convert to gas, and red have undetermined futures. Big coal won a small victory over the EPA's new mercury restrictions at the Supreme Court in June, but it's most likely a temporary reprieve. The biggest power investments are now happening in renewable energy, but fossil fuels will be with us for decades to come. The global burning of coal won't peak on a global scale until around 2025, according to BNEF. But that doesn't indicate a thriving industry. Even China, the world's biggest consumer of coal, wants to be rid of it. While China's electricity demand will soar in the coming decades, its coal use will remain relatively flat, peaking by 2030 and then declining, according to BNEF. The pollution is too thick and the alternatives too cheap for coal to flourish. The chart below shows China's ever-falling price of wind power (blue) and solar (yellow) vs. the rising cost of coal (dark gray) and natural gas (light gray) over the next 25 years. The declining prices of bonds is a huge problem for U.S. coal companies. When bond prices fall, the cost of borrowing money goes up. And coal needs more money. Coal companies are allowed to avoid costly insurance premiums by showing they have the capital to clean up after themselves. It's called self-bonding. This year the federal government has started taking a closer look at whether the struggling coal companies still qualify. In May, the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality told Alpha Natural Resources it no longer qualifies for self-bonding in the state, and the company has until Aug. 24 to post collateral or cash against $411 million of reclamation liabilities. The department last week confirmed that Peabody, the largest U.S. coal producer, can continue to self-bond. Coal is an industry in terminal decline, and financial markets are reflecting this new reality. Drastic new energy policies are still needed to avoid catastrophic climate change, according to nearly every credible analysis. But even setting aside the environmental and health issues, renewables are on a trajectory to outcompete fossil fuels, starting with coal. Between now and 2040, two-thirds of the money spent on adding new electricity capacity worldwide will be spent on renewables, according to BNEF. The table below forecasts the proportion of renewable electricity in select countries by 2040. In the past year, global stock prices for coal companies are down almost 50 percent, but it's in the bond market that coal is really getting hammered. The focus of energy finance has shifted from coal to renewables, and it's not likely to turn back.

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