Environmental Health Center Dallas

Dallas, TX, United States

Environmental Health Center Dallas

Dallas, TX, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Zeliger H.I.,Toxicological and Environmental Research | Pan Y.,Environmental Health Center Dallas | Rea W.J.,Environmental Health Center Dallas
Interdisciplinary Toxicology | Year: 2012

The exhaled breath of more than four hundred patients who presented at the Environmental Health Center - Dallas with chemical sensitivity conditions were analyzed for the relative abundance of their breath chemical composition by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. All presenting patients had no fewer than four and as many as eight co-morbid conditions. Surprisingly, almost all the exhaled breath analyses showed the presence of a preponderance of lipophilic aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The hydrophilic compounds present were almost entirely of natural origin, i.e. expected metabolites of foods. The lipophile, primarily C3 to C16 hydrocarbons and believed to have come from inhalation of polluted air, were, in all cases, present at concentrations far below those known to be toxic to humans, but caused sensitivity and signs of chemical overload. The co-morbid health effects observed are believed to be caused by the sequential absorption of lipophilic and hydrophilic chemicals; an initial absorption and retention of lipophile followed by a subsequent absorption of hydrophilic species facilitated by the retained lipophile to produce chemical mixtures that are toxic at very low levels. It is hypothesized that co-morbid conditions in chemically sensitive individuals can be predicted from analysis of their exhaled breath. Copyright © 2012 SETOX & IEPT, SASc.


Rea W.J.,Environmental Health Center Dallas
Reviews on Environmental Health | Year: 2016

Histories of mold, pollen, dust, food, chemicals, and electromagnetic field (EMF) sensitivities are the major categories of triggers for chemical sensitivity. They are tied together by the coherence phenomenon, where each has its own frequencies and identifiable EMF; therefore, they can be correlated. The diagnosis of chemical sensitivity can be done accurately in a less polluted, controlled environment, as was done in these studies. The principles of diagnosis and treatment depend on total environmental and total body pollutant loads, masking or adaptation, bipolarity of response, and biochemical individuality, among others. These principles make less polluted, controlled conditions necessary. The clinician has to use less polluted water and organic food with individual challenges for testing, including dust, mold, pesticide, natural gas, formaldehyde, particulates, and EMF testing, which needs to be performed in less polluted copper screened rooms. The challenge tests for proof of chemical sensitivity include inhaled toxics within a clean booth that is chemical and particulate free at ambient doses in parts per million (ppm) or parts per billion (ppb). Individual foods, both organic and commercial (that are contaminated with herbicides and pesticides), are used orally. Water testing and intradermal testing are performed in a less polluted, controlled environment. These include specific dose injections of molds, dust, and pollen that are preservative free, individual organic foods, and individual chemicals, i.e. methane, ethane, propane, butane, hexane, formaldehyde, ethanol, car exhaust, jet fuel exhaust, and prosthetic implants (metal plates, pacemakers, mesh, etc.). Normal saline is used as a placebo. EMF testing is performed in a copper screened room using a frequency generator. In our experience, 80% of the EMF sensitive patients had chemical sensitivity when studied under less polluted conditions for particulates, controlled natural gas, pesticides, and chemicals like formaldehyde. © 2016 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston 2016.

Loading Environmental Health Center Dallas collaborators
Loading Environmental Health Center Dallas collaborators