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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - This Sept. 29, 2016, file photo, shows a section of the Dakota Access pipeline under construction near St. Anthony in Morton County, N.D. The Dakota Access pipeline system leaked about 100 gallons of oil in western North Dakota in two separate incidents in March as crews worked to get the four-state line ready for operation. They’re the second and third known leaks on the disputed $3.8 billion pipeline. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File) BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Dakota Access pipeline and a feeder line leaked more than 100 gallons of oil in North Dakota in separate incidents in March as crews prepared the disputed $3.8 billion pipeline for operation. Two barrels, or 84 gallons (320 liters), spilled due to a leaky flange at a pipeline terminal in Watford City on March 3, according to the state's Health Department. A flange is the section connecting two sections of pipeline. Oil flow was immediately cut off and the spill was contained on site. Contaminated snow and soil were removed. No people, wildlife or waterways were affected, according to the department's environmental health database. The leak was on a line operated by a connecting shipper on the Dakota Access pipeline, said Vicki Granado, spokeswoman for Texas-based Dakota Access developer Energy Transfer Partners. "They are responsible for the operations, maintenance, etc.," she said. A leak of half a barrel, or 20 gallons (75 liters), occurred March 5 in rural Mercer County, data from the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration show. Contaminated soil was removed, and no waterways were affected. There were no reported injuries to people or wildlife. The administration is part of the Department of Transportation. The online report says an above-ground valve failed due to a manufacturing defect, causing the leak. Upstream and downstream valves were closed to isolate the leak. Later, all other such valves in the Dakota Access system were inspected and found to be OK. The federal database shows no leaks along the pipeline in Iowa or Illinois. ETP maintains the pipeline is safe, but several tribes in the Dakotas — including the the Cheyenne River, Standing Rock, Yankton and Oglala Sioux —fear environmental harm and are fighting in federal court, hoping to convince a judge to shut down the line. The Dakota Access pipeline will move North Dakota oil 1,200 miles (1,930 kilometers) through South Dakota and Iowa to a distribution point in Illinois. ETP plans to begin commercial operations June 1. North Dakota Environmental Health Chief Dave Glatt said the Health Department lists such incidents in its online database, but typically doesn't otherwise notify the public of oil spills smaller than 150 barrels unless the oil contaminates water. The pipeline leaked 84 gallons of oil in South Dakota on April 4. That spill at a rural pump station also was quickly cleaned up and didn't threaten any waterways. The state's Department of Environment and Natural Resources posted a report in its online database but didn't otherwise notify the public. Its policy is to not issue news releases on spills unless there is a threat to public health or water. Tribal leaders and attorneys say the leaks bolster their demands for further environmental review of the pipeline. "We have always said it is not a matter of it, but when," tribal attorney Jan Hasselman said after the South Dakota leak. "Pipelines spill and leak. It's just a fact."


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

New research from the University of Cincinnati (UC) reveals that residents of the Mid-Ohio River Valley (from Evansville, Indiana, north to Huntington, West Virginia) had higher than normal levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) based on blood samples collected over a 22-year span. The exposure source was likely from drinking water contaminated by industrial discharges upriver. The study, appearing in the latest publication of Environmental Pollution, looked at levels of PFOA and 10 other per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in 931 Mid-Ohio River Valley residents, testing blood serum samples collected between 1991 and 2013, to determine whether the Ohio River and Ohio River Aquifer were sources of exposure. This is the first study of PFOA serum concentrations in U.S. residents in the 1990s. "These Mid-Ohio River Valley residents appear to have had concentrations of PFOA in their bloodstream at higher than average U.S. levels,” says Susan Pinney, professor in the Department of Environmental Health at the UC College of Medicine, a member of both the Cincinnati Cancer Consortium and UC Cancer Institute and senior author of the study. Ohio River PFOA concentrations downstream were elevated, suggesting Mid-Ohio River Valley residents were exposed through drinking water, primarily contaminated by industrial discharges as far as 666 kilometers (413 miles) upstream. Industrial discharges of PFOA to the Ohio River, contaminating water systems near Parkersburg, West Virginia, were previously associated with nearby residents’ serum PFOA concentrations above U.S. general population medians. The article notes that use of granular activated carbon filtration (GAC) by water treatment facilities reduced PFOA exposure by as much as 60 percent. "Where GAC has been used, the blood level concentration of PFOA was decreased significantly,” says co-author Robert Herrick, a UC doctoral student in the Department of Environmental Health. Nearly all of the samples tested positive for some level of PFOA (99.9%) but 47 percent of the samples had PFOA levels higher than the 95th national percentile. The study additionally looked at information about municipal water distribution systems and the zones that were serviced by each of the water treatment plants. "We conducted statistical analyses to determine if factors such as location and years of residence, drinking water source and breast feeding were predictors of the person’s serum PFC concentration,” says Herrick. PFCs have had wide consumer use and industrial applications. They are surfactants used in fire-fighting foams and in the manufacture of stain and water resistant coatings, on cookware, furniture and carpeting. PFOA, or C-8, can be found as a residual impurity in some paper coatings used on containers for processed food. As a byproduct of commercial production, PFCs/PFOA are released into the environment and, although no longer used in manufacturing in the U.S., are considered persistent in the environment. Pinney points out that the primary concern with PFCs/PFOA is that they take a very long time to leave the human body, and studies indicate that exposure to PFOA and PFOS over certain levels may result in adverse health effects, including developmental effects, liver and tissue damage and immune and thyroid impacts. "Because the elimination time could be several years, it is hard to determine what impact these environmental exposures may have on our health and children’s health,” says Pinney. "These data from the 1990s demonstrate that that the contaminants have been in our water a long time, at unchecked levels, before anyone was paying attention to it.” Pinney cites projects like this one as having the translational potential to make improvements in public health. "Studies like these provide evidence to support changes in water treatment practices.” An earlier study looking at samples from girls and young women from Northern Kentucky showed that about half of the samples from the girls were much higher than the national average for U.S. children (the 95th percentile) concentration. The Northern Kentucky Water department has since then implemented the use of GAC at their plants to meet new federal regulations, and Cincinnati Water Works used the study’s findings to check their treatment regulations and filtration usage.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New research from the University of Cincinnati (UC) reveals that residents of the Mid-Ohio River Valley (from Evansville, Indiana, north to Huntington, West Virginia) had higher than normal levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) based on blood samples collected over a 22-year span. The exposure source was likely from drinking water contaminated by industrial discharges upriver. The study, appearing in the latest publication of Environmental Pollution, looked at levels of PFOA and 10 other per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in 931 Mid-Ohio River Valley residents, testing blood serum samples collected between 1991 and 2013, to determine whether the Ohio River and Ohio River Aquifer were sources of exposure. This is the first study of PFOA serum concentrations in U.S. residents in the 1990s. "These Mid-Ohio River Valley residents appear to have had concentrations of PFOA in their bloodstream at higher than average U.S. levels," says Susan Pinney, PhD, professor in the Department of Environmental Health at the UC College of Medicine, a member of both the Cincinnati Cancer Consortium and UC Cancer Institute and senior author of the study. Ohio River PFOA concentrations downstream were elevated, suggesting Mid-Ohio River Valley residents were exposed through drinking water, primarily contaminated by industrial discharges as far as 666 kilometers (413 miles) upstream. Industrial discharges of PFOA to the Ohio River, contaminating water systems near Parkersburg, West Virginia, were previously associated with nearby residents' serum PFOA concentrations above U.S. general population medians. The article notes that use of granular activated carbon filtration (GAC) by water treatment facilities reduced PFOA exposure by as much as 60 percent. "Where GAC has been used, the blood level concentration of PFOA was decreased significantly," says co-author Robert Herrick, a UC doctoral student in the Department of Environmental Health. Nearly all of the samples tested positive for some level of PFOA (99.9%) but 47 percent of the samples had PFOA levels higher than the 95th national percentile. The study additionally looked at information about municipal water distribution systems and the zones that were serviced by each of the water treatment plants. "We conducted statistical analyses to determine if factors such as location and years of residence, drinking water source and breast feeding were predictors of the person's serum PFC concentration," says Herrick. PFCs have had wide consumer use and industrial applications. They are surfactants used in fire-fighting foams and in the manufacture of stain and water resistant coatings, on cookware, furniture and carpeting. PFOA, or C-8, can be found as a residual impurity in some paper coatings used on containers for processed food. As a byproduct of commercial production, PFCs/PFOA are released into the environment and, although no longer used in manufacturing in the U.S., are considered persistent in the environment. Pinney points out that the primary concern with PFCs/PFOA is that they take a very long time to leave the human body, and studies indicate that exposure to PFOA and PFOS over certain levels may result in adverse health effects, including developmental effects, liver and tissue damage and immune and thyroid impacts. "Because the elimination time could be several years, it is hard to determine what impact these environmental exposures may have on our health and children's health," says Pinney. "These data from the 1990s demonstrate that that the contaminants have been in our water a long time, at unchecked levels, before anyone was paying attention to it." Pinney cites projects like this one as having the translational potential to make improvements in public health. "Studies like these provide evidence to support changes in water treatment practices." An earlier study looking at samples from girls and young women from Northern Kentucky showed that about half of the samples from the girls were much higher than the national average for U.S. children (the 95th percentile) concentration. The Northern Kentucky Water department has since then implemented the use of GAC at their plants to meet new federal regulations, and Cincinnati Water Works used the study's findings to check their treatment regulations and filtration usage. The Mid-Ohio River Valley study was conducted by researchers within the UC College of Medicine Department of Environmental Health, at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Research was made possible by the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program awards U01ES012770 and U01ES019453 from the NIEHS and the National Cancer Institute; P30-ES006096, R21 ES017176 and T32-ES10957 from NIEHS; EPA-RD-83478801 from the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and CSTAUL1RR026314 from the National Center for Research Resources. Pinney cites no conflict of interest.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

New research from the University of Cincinnati (UC) reveals that residents of the Mid-Ohio River Valley (from Evansville, Indiana, north to Huntington, West Virginia) had higher than normal levels of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) based on blood samples collected over a 22-year span. The exposure source was likely from drinking water contaminated by industrial discharges upriver. The study, appearing in the latest publication of Environmental Pollution, looked at levels of PFOA and 10 other per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in 931 Mid-Ohio River Valley residents, testing blood serum samples collected between 1991 and 2013, to determine whether the Ohio River and Ohio River Aquifer were sources of exposure. This is the first study of PFOA serum concentrations in U.S. residents in the 1990s. "These Mid-Ohio River Valley residents appear to have had concentrations of PFOA in their bloodstream at higher than average U.S. levels,” says Susan Pinney, professor in the Department of Environmental Health at the UC College of Medicine, a member of both the Cincinnati Cancer Consortium and UC Cancer Institute and senior author of the study. Ohio River PFOA concentrations downstream were elevated, suggesting Mid-Ohio River Valley residents were exposed through drinking water, primarily contaminated by industrial discharges as far as 666 kilometers (413 miles) upstream. Industrial discharges of PFOA to the Ohio River, contaminating water systems near Parkersburg, West Virginia, were previously associated with nearby residents’ serum PFOA concentrations above U.S. general population medians. The article notes that use of granular activated carbon filtration (GAC) by water treatment facilities reduced PFOA exposure by as much as 60 percent. "Where GAC has been used, the blood level concentration of PFOA was decreased significantly,” says co-author Robert Herrick, a UC doctoral student in the Department of Environmental Health. Nearly all of the samples tested positive for some level of PFOA (99.9%) but 47 percent of the samples had PFOA levels higher than the 95th national percentile. The study additionally looked at information about municipal water distribution systems and the zones that were serviced by each of the water treatment plants. "We conducted statistical analyses to determine if factors such as location and years of residence, drinking water source and breast feeding were predictors of the person’s serum PFC concentration,” says Herrick. PFCs have had wide consumer use and industrial applications. They are surfactants used in fire-fighting foams and in the manufacture of stain and water resistant coatings, on cookware, furniture and carpeting. PFOA, or C-8, can be found as a residual impurity in some paper coatings used on containers for processed food. As a byproduct of commercial production, PFCs/PFOA are released into the environment and, although no longer used in manufacturing in the U.S., are considered persistent in the environment. Pinney points out that the primary concern with PFCs/PFOA is that they take a very long time to leave the human body, and studies indicate that exposure to PFOA and PFOS over certain levels may result in adverse health effects, including developmental effects, liver and tissue damage and immune and thyroid impacts. "Because the elimination time could be several years, it is hard to determine what impact these environmental exposures may have on our health and children’s health,” says Pinney. "These data from the 1990s demonstrate that that the contaminants have been in our water a long time, at unchecked levels, before anyone was paying attention to it.” Pinney cites projects like this one as having the translational potential to make improvements in public health. "Studies like these provide evidence to support changes in water treatment practices.” An earlier study looking at samples from girls and young women from Northern Kentucky showed that about half of the samples from the girls were much higher than the national average for U.S. children (the 95th percentile) concentration. The Northern Kentucky Water department has since then implemented the use of GAC at their plants to meet new federal regulations, and Cincinnati Water Works used the study’s findings to check their treatment regulations and filtration usage.


CINCINNATI, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Meridian Bioscience, Inc. (NASDAQ:VIVO) announced today that Magellan Diagnostics Inc., a business unit of Meridian, has embarked on a major new initiative to increase awareness among obstetricians and pregnant women about the risks of lead poisoning.  The effort is being kicked off today with an expert-led discussion of lead poisoning in pregnancy at a national gathering of obstetricians in San Diego, California.   Lead exposure is a pervasive health threat which, even at low levels, can cause behavioral and learning disabilities, hyperactivity and lower IQ in children.  In adults, it can result in difficulty becoming pregnant and maintaining a healthy pregnancy, reduced fertility, as well as hypertension and kidney dysfunction. It is estimated that in the US, 1 in every 100 women of childbearing age has a blood lead level above the current reference value of 5 µg/dL. Mary Jean Brown, ScD, RN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; and the Former Chief of the Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who spoke at the Magellan-sponsored event is an author of the seminal 2010 CDC report on lead exposure in pregnancy.  She explained, “Because lead crosses the placental barrier, maternal blood lead passes to baby. There is clear evidence that across a broad range of maternal exposure levels, lead can negatively impact both maternal and child health.” “Since news of the lead in water crisis in Flint, Michigan and in other communities across the nation has become widespread, the public is more aware that lead poisoning is still a problem,” said Amy Winslow, president and CEO of Magellan Diagnostics, “but few realize that pregnant women should also be concerned about lead exposure. We want obstetricians and expectant moms to be aware of the risks, and of the importance that a simple screening test can have in avoiding the consequences of undiagnosed lead exposure.” Magellan’s program also featured recommendations from Jeanne Hewitt PhD, RN Director, Community Engagement at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Children's Environmental Health Sciences Center, an environmental public health nurse and researcher who has studied lead exposure for years. Dr. Hewitt described the women who are at risk, “Do-it-yourself renovations are very popular, but many women don’t realize they may be creating lead dust that can be inhaled or ingested. If a woman lives or works in an area where the water may be tainted with lead this is a concern. We also find that many immigrant families have higher levels of lead exposure from their country of origin. In addition, my research has focused on how lead in second hand smoke is also an underappreciated source of exposure.” Discussing how obstetricians can respond if they identify lead poisoning, Dr. Brown commented, “The first and most important step is to find the source of the lead and eliminate it. It is also critical to focus on the mother’s nutritional status – anemia and other deficiencies can worsen the effects of lead exposure.  Finally, it’s important to educate Mom on the sources of lead, so that they can bring their newborns home to a lead-free environment.” Magellan’s Lead in Pregnancy initiative is scheduled to run throughout the spring and summer, culminating during Women’s Health Quarter at the end of the year.  The company will be hosting webinars and local educational events across the country, including mobile blood lead testing, in addition to offering introductory programs designed to help obstetricians start to perform lead screening as part of the services they offer to their patients. For more information, visit: www2.magellandx.com/ob. About Magellan Diagnostics, Inc.   Magellan Diagnostics is a medical device company that provides point-of-care systems, clinical laboratory instruments, and analytical laboratory services focused on lead testing. A business unit of Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Magellan is headquartered outside Boston in Billerica, Massachusetts, and is dedicated to offering high-quality, reliable products that help identify children and adults at risk of harm due to lead exposure, including LeadCare II, the only point-of-care system used to diagnose lead poisoning in physician offices and clinics.  We are committed to educating clinicians, policy makers, payers, families and communities about the permanent health damage caused by lead and how to detect and address lead exposure.  For more information, visit www.magellandx.com. About Meridian Bioscience, Inc. Meridian is a fully integrated life science company that develops, manufactures, markets and distributes a broad range of innovative diagnostic test kits, rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components. Utilizing a variety of methods, our diagnostic tests provide accuracy, simplicity and speed in the early diagnosis and treatment of common medical conditions, such as infections and lead poisoning. Meridian’s diagnostic products are used outside of the human body and require little or no special equipment. The Company's diagnostic products are designed to enhance patient well-being while reducing the total outcome costs of health care. Meridian has strong market positions in the areas of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections, and blood lead level testing. In addition, Meridian is a supplier of rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components used by organizations in the life science and agri-bio industries engaged in research. Its products are also used by companies as components in the manufacture of diagnostics. The Company markets its products and technologies to hospitals, reference laboratories, research centers, diagnostics manufacturers and agri-bio companies in more than 70 countries around the world. The Company’s shares are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, symbol VIVO. Meridian's website address is www.meridianbioscience.com.


CINCINNATI, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Meridian Bioscience, Inc. (NASDAQ:VIVO) announced today that Magellan Diagnostics Inc., a business unit of Meridian, has embarked on a major new initiative to increase awareness among obstetricians and pregnant women about the risks of lead poisoning.  The effort is being kicked off today with an expert-led discussion of lead poisoning in pregnancy at a national gathering of obstetricians in San Diego, California.   Lead exposure is a pervasive health threat which, even at low levels, can cause behavioral and learning disabilities, hyperactivity and lower IQ in children.  In adults, it can result in difficulty becoming pregnant and maintaining a healthy pregnancy, reduced fertility, as well as hypertension and kidney dysfunction. It is estimated that in the US, 1 in every 100 women of childbearing age has a blood lead level above the current reference value of 5 µg/dL. Mary Jean Brown, ScD, RN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; and the Former Chief of the Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who spoke at the Magellan-sponsored event is an author of the seminal 2010 CDC report on lead exposure in pregnancy.  She explained, “Because lead crosses the placental barrier, maternal blood lead passes to baby. There is clear evidence that across a broad range of maternal exposure levels, lead can negatively impact both maternal and child health.” “Since news of the lead in water crisis in Flint, Michigan and in other communities across the nation has become widespread, the public is more aware that lead poisoning is still a problem,” said Amy Winslow, president and CEO of Magellan Diagnostics, “but few realize that pregnant women should also be concerned about lead exposure. We want obstetricians and expectant moms to be aware of the risks, and of the importance that a simple screening test can have in avoiding the consequences of undiagnosed lead exposure.” Magellan’s program also featured recommendations from Jeanne Hewitt PhD, RN Director, Community Engagement at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Children's Environmental Health Sciences Center, an environmental public health nurse and researcher who has studied lead exposure for years. Dr. Hewitt described the women who are at risk, “Do-it-yourself renovations are very popular, but many women don’t realize they may be creating lead dust that can be inhaled or ingested. If a woman lives or works in an area where the water may be tainted with lead this is a concern. We also find that many immigrant families have higher levels of lead exposure from their country of origin. In addition, my research has focused on how lead in second hand smoke is also an underappreciated source of exposure.” Discussing how obstetricians can respond if they identify lead poisoning, Dr. Brown commented, “The first and most important step is to find the source of the lead and eliminate it. It is also critical to focus on the mother’s nutritional status – anemia and other deficiencies can worsen the effects of lead exposure.  Finally, it’s important to educate Mom on the sources of lead, so that they can bring their newborns home to a lead-free environment.” Magellan’s Lead in Pregnancy initiative is scheduled to run throughout the spring and summer, culminating during Women’s Health Quarter at the end of the year.  The company will be hosting webinars and local educational events across the country, including mobile blood lead testing, in addition to offering introductory programs designed to help obstetricians start to perform lead screening as part of the services they offer to their patients. For more information, visit: www2.magellandx.com/ob. About Magellan Diagnostics, Inc.   Magellan Diagnostics is a medical device company that provides point-of-care systems, clinical laboratory instruments, and analytical laboratory services focused on lead testing. A business unit of Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Magellan is headquartered outside Boston in Billerica, Massachusetts, and is dedicated to offering high-quality, reliable products that help identify children and adults at risk of harm due to lead exposure, including LeadCare II, the only point-of-care system used to diagnose lead poisoning in physician offices and clinics.  We are committed to educating clinicians, policy makers, payers, families and communities about the permanent health damage caused by lead and how to detect and address lead exposure.  For more information, visit www.magellandx.com. About Meridian Bioscience, Inc. Meridian is a fully integrated life science company that develops, manufactures, markets and distributes a broad range of innovative diagnostic test kits, rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components. Utilizing a variety of methods, our diagnostic tests provide accuracy, simplicity and speed in the early diagnosis and treatment of common medical conditions, such as infections and lead poisoning. Meridian’s diagnostic products are used outside of the human body and require little or no special equipment. The Company's diagnostic products are designed to enhance patient well-being while reducing the total outcome costs of health care. Meridian has strong market positions in the areas of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections, and blood lead level testing. In addition, Meridian is a supplier of rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components used by organizations in the life science and agri-bio industries engaged in research. Its products are also used by companies as components in the manufacture of diagnostics. The Company markets its products and technologies to hospitals, reference laboratories, research centers, diagnostics manufacturers and agri-bio companies in more than 70 countries around the world. The Company’s shares are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, symbol VIVO. Meridian's website address is www.meridianbioscience.com.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

NSF International, a global public health and safety organization that provides food safety and quality assurance services across all food supply chain sectors, announced the recipients of the 2017 NSF Food Safety Leadership Awards today at the 2017 Food Safety Summit in Rosemont, Illinois: 2017 NSF Food Safety Leadership Lifetime Achievement Awards: Jack J. Guzewich, MPH Consultant and Trainer in Foodborne Disease Epidemiology and Food Emergency Response NSF International’s Food Safety Leadership Awards recognize individuals and organizations for real and lasting improvements in food safety. Created in 2004, the awards encourage the development of educational programs, processes and technologies to advance food safety. Each year, an independent panel of food safety experts from academia, industry and the regulatory community reviews nominations from around the world to select the recipients. Nominations are evaluated on the basis of innovation, impact and contribution to the advancement of food safety. “These awards honor the recipients for their contributions to food safety and the protection of public health. The work of Jack Guzewich, David Theno and Lee-Ann Jaykus has contributed to important advances in food safety research, industry innovation and pathogen mitigation. Their leadership and enthusiasm in science-based research, collaboration and information sharing to help solve vital food safety issues embodies the spirit of NSF International’s Food Safety Leadership Awards,” said Kevan P. Lawlor, NSF International President and Chief Executive Officer. Lifetime Achievement Award: Jack J. Guzewich, MPH, Consultant and Trainer in Foodborne Disease Epidemiology and Food Emergency Response Over his 46-year career, Jack J. Guzewich has been a national leader in food safety regulation and the epidemiology of foodborne disease. He is a proponent of environmental assessment including root cause analysis to investigate the causes of foodborne disease outbreaks and food contamination events. Much of his career was spent on investigations to understand how food becomes contaminated with foodborne pathogens and the ecology of pathogens in various environments. Mr. Guzewich directed the New York State Department of Health’s food safety program for 17 years and created the Foodborne Disease Surveillance System (FBDS), an extensive database of reported foodborne disease outbreaks including their contributing factors. FBDS was one of the first systems of its kind and served as a precursor to today’s National Outbreak Reporting System. Mr. Guzewich guided the adoption of New York’s regulation to prohibit bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat foods and worked to include these provisions in the FDA Food Code. He was instrumental in documenting gastroenteritis and Salmonella enteritidis outbreaks associated with shellfish and shelled eggs, respectively, by identifying trends and developing interventions to prevent future outbreaks. As a result, control recommendations implemented by New York under his leadership led to national improvements as provided in the 2009 Egg Safety Final Rule. At the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Mr. Guzewich created and led the Center’s Emergency Coordination and Response program with a strong emphasis on prevention and control of foodborne disease. He developed the FDA procedures for investigating produce farms implicated in outbreaks or contamination events to identify the root causes of contamination, which required an environmental assessment versus a routine inspection. He worked very closely with the CDC’s Environmental Health Specialist Network to help develop the National Environmental Assessment Reporting System which is used by several states to help identify the root causes of foodborne disease outbreaks. He was also instrumental in developing the publication Procedures to Investigate Foodborne Illness and contributed to the first editions of Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response and Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response – Toolkit. “Jack Guzewich is the epitome of a food safety leader,” says Dale L. Morse, MD, Associate Director for Food Safety, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, CDC. “His career was built on hard work, innovative creation of foodborne illness surveillance networks and databases, application of these networks to identify causes and initiate long-term control recommendations, and educational pursuits to train the next generation of food safety leaders.” Lifetime Achievement Award: David M. Theno, Ph.D., CEO/CBIO, Gray Dog Partners, Inc. Throughout his 40-year career, Dr. David M. Theno’s work set new standards for food safety leadership and management in food production and in the foodservice industry. He has been instrumental in demonstrating how the scientific community and the meat/food industry can work together to solve food safety challenges. Dr. Theno installed the first Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) program in an animal protein production plant while at Foster Farms in the mid-1980s. His work in the early 1990s at Jack in the Box is widely credited with setting new standards for food safety leadership and management in all aspects of food production. After an Escherichia coli (E. coli) 0157:H7 infection of the chain’s burgers caused a foodborne illness outbreak in the Pacific Northwest, he developed the first comprehensive food safety management plan for a foodservice chain. He also implemented a finished ground beef testing protocol, a comprehensive supply chain auditing system and a “test and hold” protocol for ground beef that is now an industry standard. This management program resulted in a significant reduction of foodborne illness outbreaks in the foodservice industry, and all major foodservice chain organizations today have implemented a food safety management plan based on this program. Serving as a member of the USDA’s National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods, Dr. Theno was instrumental in changing the way the USDA and the industry look at food safety. He played an essential role in helping guide the beef industry’s research activities to better understand E. coli O157, and helped form the Beef Industry Food Safety Council, which develops and updates food safety practices that are critical for the food industry. Dr. Theno is one of the original authors of the HACCP guidance issued by FDA and USDA/FSIS that is in place today, and has authored numerous scientific and trade publication articles. “David Theno’s leadership through the E. coli outbreaks in the 1990s set the stage for the entire industry to come together in a non-competitive, collaborative effort to employ science-based solutions to tackle emerging pathogenic threats,” says Thomas H. Powell, Ph.D., CAE, Executive Director, American Meat Science Association. “Dr. Theno led the effort to identify and implement viable interventions and spurred research into new intervention strategies. His greatest impact was his unswerving dedication to protecting the consumer and his complete transparency with other industry food safety leaders. He freely shared the valuable insights he gained through the fiery trials on the front lines of the early outbreaks.” Dr. Lee-Ann Jaykus has over 30 years’ experience advancing the science of food safety through applied infection prevention and control science, especially regarding norovirus. She has collaborated on many large, multi-institutional projects on foodborne pathogens and food virology, including developing methods to detect human enteric virus contamination in foods and environmental samples, and better understanding the dynamics of virus transmission through the food chain. She serves as the Scientific Director of the USDA-NIFA Food Virology Collaborative (NoroCORE), a team of 30-plus scientists representing 18 academic and government institutions working to develop improved tools, skills and capacity to understand and control foodborne virus disease risks. Under Dr. Jaykus’ direction, NoroCORE has worked closely with companies, trade organizations, government regulators and public health entities to identify and address the most important food virology problems, and translate results into real-world processes and actions. These include cultivating human norovirus which had eluded scientists for 50 years, developing a risk-modeling program for tracking norovirus that can calculate disease risk and screen strategies for managing contamination in food service and health care facilities, confirming that alcohol-based hand sanitizers cannot completely inactivate norovirus and working to modify FDA Food Code recommendations to facilitate norovirus control. In her academic career, Dr. Jaykus has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in food microbiology and safety, mentored over 30 graduate students and post-doctoral research associates, and authored over 150 publications. “I have never met a scientist or food safety professional as enthusiastic and competent as Dr. Jaykus is in defining the issues, developing key needs, initiating the means to fill gaps and translating findings quickly into industry applications,” says Hal King, Ph.D., President/CEO of Public Health Innovations LLC. “Her work will lead to improved methods to prevent norovirus foodborne disease infections around the world, and she has elevated our nation’s food safety competencies across all sectors of the food chain.” Editor’s note: For more information on the NSF Food Safety Leadership Awards or to schedule an interview with an NSF International food safety expert, contact Liz Nowland-Margolis at media(at)nsf.org or +1 734-418-6624. About NSF International: NSF International (nsf.org) is a global independent organization that writes standards, and tests and certifies products for the food, water and consumer goods industries to minimize adverse health effects and protect the environment. Founded in 1944, NSF is committed to protecting human health and safety worldwide. NSF International is a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Food Safety, Water Quality and Indoor Environment. NSF International provides expertise and accredited food services across all supply chain sectors, including agriculture, animal feed and welfare, produce, processing, distribution, dairy, seafood, quality management software, retail and restaurants. Services include Global Food Safety Initiative, foodservice equipment and nonfood compounds certification, HACCP validation and inspection, label claims verification and certification, DNA and food package testing, product and process development, food fraud consulting and training, and organic and Certified Transitional certification through Quality Assurance International (QAI).


CINCINNATI, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Meridian Bioscience, Inc. (NASDAQ:VIVO) announced today that Magellan Diagnostics Inc., a business unit of Meridian, has embarked on a major new initiative to increase awareness among obstetricians and pregnant women about the risks of lead poisoning.  The effort is being kicked off today with an expert-led discussion of lead poisoning in pregnancy at a national gathering of obstetricians in San Diego, California.   Lead exposure is a pervasive health threat which, even at low levels, can cause behavioral and learning disabilities, hyperactivity and lower IQ in children.  In adults, it can result in difficulty becoming pregnant and maintaining a healthy pregnancy, reduced fertility, as well as hypertension and kidney dysfunction. It is estimated that in the US, 1 in every 100 women of childbearing age has a blood lead level above the current reference value of 5 µg/dL. Mary Jean Brown, ScD, RN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; and the Former Chief of the Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who spoke at the Magellan-sponsored event is an author of the seminal 2010 CDC report on lead exposure in pregnancy.  She explained, “Because lead crosses the placental barrier, maternal blood lead passes to baby. There is clear evidence that across a broad range of maternal exposure levels, lead can negatively impact both maternal and child health.” “Since news of the lead in water crisis in Flint, Michigan and in other communities across the nation has become widespread, the public is more aware that lead poisoning is still a problem,” said Amy Winslow, president and CEO of Magellan Diagnostics, “but few realize that pregnant women should also be concerned about lead exposure. We want obstetricians and expectant moms to be aware of the risks, and of the importance that a simple screening test can have in avoiding the consequences of undiagnosed lead exposure.” Magellan’s program also featured recommendations from Jeanne Hewitt PhD, RN Director, Community Engagement at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Children's Environmental Health Sciences Center, an environmental public health nurse and researcher who has studied lead exposure for years. Dr. Hewitt described the women who are at risk, “Do-it-yourself renovations are very popular, but many women don’t realize they may be creating lead dust that can be inhaled or ingested. If a woman lives or works in an area where the water may be tainted with lead this is a concern. We also find that many immigrant families have higher levels of lead exposure from their country of origin. In addition, my research has focused on how lead in second hand smoke is also an underappreciated source of exposure.” Discussing how obstetricians can respond if they identify lead poisoning, Dr. Brown commented, “The first and most important step is to find the source of the lead and eliminate it. It is also critical to focus on the mother’s nutritional status – anemia and other deficiencies can worsen the effects of lead exposure.  Finally, it’s important to educate Mom on the sources of lead, so that they can bring their newborns home to a lead-free environment.” Magellan’s Lead in Pregnancy initiative is scheduled to run throughout the spring and summer, culminating during Women’s Health Quarter at the end of the year.  The company will be hosting webinars and local educational events across the country, including mobile blood lead testing, in addition to offering introductory programs designed to help obstetricians start to perform lead screening as part of the services they offer to their patients. For more information, visit: www2.magellandx.com/ob. About Magellan Diagnostics, Inc.   Magellan Diagnostics is a medical device company that provides point-of-care systems, clinical laboratory instruments, and analytical laboratory services focused on lead testing. A business unit of Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Magellan is headquartered outside Boston in Billerica, Massachusetts, and is dedicated to offering high-quality, reliable products that help identify children and adults at risk of harm due to lead exposure, including LeadCare II, the only point-of-care system used to diagnose lead poisoning in physician offices and clinics.  We are committed to educating clinicians, policy makers, payers, families and communities about the permanent health damage caused by lead and how to detect and address lead exposure.  For more information, visit www.magellandx.com. About Meridian Bioscience, Inc. Meridian is a fully integrated life science company that develops, manufactures, markets and distributes a broad range of innovative diagnostic test kits, rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components. Utilizing a variety of methods, our diagnostic tests provide accuracy, simplicity and speed in the early diagnosis and treatment of common medical conditions, such as infections and lead poisoning. Meridian’s diagnostic products are used outside of the human body and require little or no special equipment. The Company's diagnostic products are designed to enhance patient well-being while reducing the total outcome costs of health care. Meridian has strong market positions in the areas of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections, and blood lead level testing. In addition, Meridian is a supplier of rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components used by organizations in the life science and agri-bio industries engaged in research. Its products are also used by companies as components in the manufacture of diagnostics. The Company markets its products and technologies to hospitals, reference laboratories, research centers, diagnostics manufacturers and agri-bio companies in more than 70 countries around the world. The Company’s shares are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, symbol VIVO. Meridian's website address is www.meridianbioscience.com.


CINCINNATI, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Meridian Bioscience, Inc. (NASDAQ:VIVO) announced today that Magellan Diagnostics Inc., a business unit of Meridian, has embarked on a major new initiative to increase awareness among obstetricians and pregnant women about the risks of lead poisoning.  The effort is being kicked off today with an expert-led discussion of lead poisoning in pregnancy at a national gathering of obstetricians in San Diego, California.   Lead exposure is a pervasive health threat which, even at low levels, can cause behavioral and learning disabilities, hyperactivity and lower IQ in children.  In adults, it can result in difficulty becoming pregnant and maintaining a healthy pregnancy, reduced fertility, as well as hypertension and kidney dysfunction. It is estimated that in the US, 1 in every 100 women of childbearing age has a blood lead level above the current reference value of 5 µg/dL. Mary Jean Brown, ScD, RN, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health; and the Former Chief of the Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who spoke at the Magellan-sponsored event is an author of the seminal 2010 CDC report on lead exposure in pregnancy.  She explained, “Because lead crosses the placental barrier, maternal blood lead passes to baby. There is clear evidence that across a broad range of maternal exposure levels, lead can negatively impact both maternal and child health.” “Since news of the lead in water crisis in Flint, Michigan and in other communities across the nation has become widespread, the public is more aware that lead poisoning is still a problem,” said Amy Winslow, president and CEO of Magellan Diagnostics, “but few realize that pregnant women should also be concerned about lead exposure. We want obstetricians and expectant moms to be aware of the risks, and of the importance that a simple screening test can have in avoiding the consequences of undiagnosed lead exposure.” Magellan’s program also featured recommendations from Jeanne Hewitt PhD, RN Director, Community Engagement at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Children's Environmental Health Sciences Center, an environmental public health nurse and researcher who has studied lead exposure for years. Dr. Hewitt described the women who are at risk, “Do-it-yourself renovations are very popular, but many women don’t realize they may be creating lead dust that can be inhaled or ingested. If a woman lives or works in an area where the water may be tainted with lead this is a concern. We also find that many immigrant families have higher levels of lead exposure from their country of origin. In addition, my research has focused on how lead in second hand smoke is also an underappreciated source of exposure.” Discussing how obstetricians can respond if they identify lead poisoning, Dr. Brown commented, “The first and most important step is to find the source of the lead and eliminate it. It is also critical to focus on the mother’s nutritional status – anemia and other deficiencies can worsen the effects of lead exposure.  Finally, it’s important to educate Mom on the sources of lead, so that they can bring their newborns home to a lead-free environment.” Magellan’s Lead in Pregnancy initiative is scheduled to run throughout the spring and summer, culminating during Women’s Health Quarter at the end of the year.  The company will be hosting webinars and local educational events across the country, including mobile blood lead testing, in addition to offering introductory programs designed to help obstetricians start to perform lead screening as part of the services they offer to their patients. For more information, visit: www2.magellandx.com/ob. About Magellan Diagnostics, Inc.   Magellan Diagnostics is a medical device company that provides point-of-care systems, clinical laboratory instruments, and analytical laboratory services focused on lead testing. A business unit of Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Magellan is headquartered outside Boston in Billerica, Massachusetts, and is dedicated to offering high-quality, reliable products that help identify children and adults at risk of harm due to lead exposure, including LeadCare II, the only point-of-care system used to diagnose lead poisoning in physician offices and clinics.  We are committed to educating clinicians, policy makers, payers, families and communities about the permanent health damage caused by lead and how to detect and address lead exposure.  For more information, visit www.magellandx.com. About Meridian Bioscience, Inc. Meridian is a fully integrated life science company that develops, manufactures, markets and distributes a broad range of innovative diagnostic test kits, rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components. Utilizing a variety of methods, our diagnostic tests provide accuracy, simplicity and speed in the early diagnosis and treatment of common medical conditions, such as infections and lead poisoning. Meridian’s diagnostic products are used outside of the human body and require little or no special equipment. The Company's diagnostic products are designed to enhance patient well-being while reducing the total outcome costs of health care. Meridian has strong market positions in the areas of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory infections, and blood lead level testing. In addition, Meridian is a supplier of rare reagents, specialty biologicals and components used by organizations in the life science and agri-bio industries engaged in research. Its products are also used by companies as components in the manufacture of diagnostics. The Company markets its products and technologies to hospitals, reference laboratories, research centers, diagnostics manufacturers and agri-bio companies in more than 70 countries around the world. The Company’s shares are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, symbol VIVO. Meridian's website address is www.meridianbioscience.com.

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