Environmental Engineering

State College, PA, United States

Environmental Engineering

State College, PA, United States

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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

VOORHEES, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--American Water (NYSE: AWK), the nation’s largest publicly traded water and wastewater utility company, today announced Lindsey Olson, operations superintendent with New Jersey American Water, will participate in Think Diversity on June 28 in Arlington, Va. Olson, who was recently recognized by Water & Wastes Digest Magazine as a “Top Young Professional,” will discuss what attracted her to the water industry and how the industry can draw in high-achieving talent. “As we see more of our tenured employees start to retire, there is a pressing need to recruit talent into the water industry to ensure the continued quality of our water,” said Melanie Kennedy, senior vice president of Human Resources. “Developing and promoting employees within our company is another great way to ensure succession of our talent; and Lindsey is a great example of how we do this.” Olson was recently promoted to her new role. She joined American Water 18 years ago and has worked on both rehabilitation and expansion of existing facilities, as well as greenfield design and construction of new treatment plants. She has developed particular expertise in groundwater treatment technologies, including iron and manganese filtration systems, organics and radionuclide adsorption processes, and other trace contaminant removal technologies. Olson has also taken on leadership positions in both the New Jersey section and national board of American Water Works Association (AWWA) and was a contributing author to AWWA’s M-65 Manual for Onsite Generation of Sodium Hypochlorite, all while earning her master’s degree in Environmental Engineering from Rutgers University, N.J. Scranton Gillette Communications’ Water & Wastes Digest and Roads & Bridges magazine is hosting the live conference as a continuation of their cooperative “Think Diversity” education program. The event will include how technology is driving a diverse workforce, and ways to implement succession planning. The program is an interactive format with presenters who are immersed in the infrastructure industry and have success stories to share on how they mastered diversity in their companies or municipalities. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly-traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs more than 6,700 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com. Click here to subscribe to Mobile Alerts for American Water.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites. "Currently, we have to ship methane via pipelines," said Thomas K. Wood, holder of the biotechnology endowed chair and professor of chemical engineering, Penn State. "When you ship methane, you release a greenhouse gas. We can't eliminate all the leakage, but we could cut it in half if we didn't ship it via pipe long distances." The researchers' goal is to use microbial fuel cells to convert methane into electricity near the wellheads, eliminating long-distance transport. That goal is still far in the future, but they now have created a bacteria-powered fuel cell that can convert the methane into small amounts of electricity. "People have tried for decades to directly convert methane," said Wood. "But they haven't been able to do it with microbial fuel cells. We've engineered a strain of bacteria that can." Microbial fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy using microorganisms. They can run on most organic material, including wastewater, acetate and brewing waste. Methane, however, causes some problems for microbial fuel cells because, while there are bacteria that consume methane, they live in the depths of the ocean and are not currently culturable in the laboratory. "We know of a bacterium that can produce an energy enzyme that grabs methane," said Wood. "We can't grow them in captivity, but we looked at the DNA and found something from the bottom of the Black Sea and synthesized it." The researchers actually created a consortium of bacteria that produces electricity because each bacterium does its portion of the job. Using synthetic biological approaches, including DNA cloning, the researchers created a bacterium like those in the depths of the Black Sea, but one they can grow in the laboratory. This bacterium uses methane and produces acetate, electrons and the energy enzyme that grabs electrons. The researchers also added a mixture of bacteria found in sludge from an anaerobic digester -- the last step in waste treatment. This sludge contains bacteria that produce compounds that can transport electrons to an electrode, but these bacteria needed to be acclimated to methane to survive in the fuel cell. They report the results of their work today (May 17) in Nature Communications. "We need electron shuttles in this process," said Wood. "Bacteria in sludge act as those shuttles." Once electrons reach an electrode, the flow of electrons produces electricity. To increase the amount of electricity produced, the researchers used a naturally occurring bacterial genus -- Geobacter, which consumes the acetate created by the synthetic bacteria that captures methane to produce electrons. To show that an electron shuttle was necessary, the researchers ran the fuel cell with only the synthetic bacteria and Geobacter. The fuel cell produced no electricity. They added humic acids -- a non-living electron shuttle -- and the fuel cells worked. Bacteria from the sludge are better shuttles than humic acids because they are self-sustaining. The researchers have filed provisional patents on this process. "This process makes a lot of electricity for a microbial fuel cell," said Wood. "However, at this point that amount is 1,000 times less than the electricity produced by a methanol fuel cell." Also working on this project were Michael J. McAnulty, recent doctorate recipient and Venkata Giridhar Poosaria, postdoctoral fellow in chemical engineering; Bruce E. Logan, Evan Pugh Professor in Engineering and the Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering and Kyoung-Yeol Kim, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; all at Penn State. Ricardo Jasso-Chávez, National Institute of Cardiology, Mexico City, also participated in this research. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency -- Energy supported this work.


News Article | May 29, 2017
Site: phys.org

"The goal of this technology is to generate electricity from where the rivers meet the ocean," said Christopher Gorski, assistant professor in environmental engineering at Penn State. "It's based on the difference in the salt concentrations between the two water sources." That difference in salt concentration has the potential to generate enough energy to meet up to 40 percent of global electricity demands. Though methods currently exist to capture this energy, the two most successful methods, pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED), have thus far fallen short. PRO, the most common system, selectively allows water to transport through a semi-permeable membrane, while rejecting salt. The osmotic pressure created from this process is then converted into energy by turning turbines. "PRO is so far the best technology in terms of how much energy you can get out," Gorski said. "But the main problem with PRO is that the membranes that transport the water through foul, meaning that bacteria grows on them or particles get stuck on their surfaces, and they no longer transport water through them." This occurs because the holes in the membranes are incredibly small, so they become blocked easily. In addition, PRO doesn't have the ability to withstand the necessary pressures of super salty waters. The second technology, RED, uses an electrochemical gradient to develop voltages across ion-exchange membranes. "Ion exchange membranes only allow either positively charged ions to move through them or negatively charged ions," Gorski explained. "So only the dissolved salt is going through, and not the water itself." Here, the energy is created when chloride or sodium ions are kept from crossing ion-exchange membranes as a result of selective ion transport. Ion-exchange membranes don't require water to flow through them, so they don't foul as easily as the membranes used in PRO; however, the problem with RED is that it doesn't have the ability to produce large amounts of power. A third technology, capacitive mixing (CapMix), is a relatively new method also being explored. CapMix is an electrode-based technology that captures energy from the voltage that develops when two identical electrodes are sequentially exposed to two different kinds of water with varying salt concentrations, such as freshwater and seawater. Like RED, the problem with CapMix is that it's not able to yield enough power to be viable. Gorski, along with Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and the Stan and Flora Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, and Taeyoung Kim, post-doctoral scholar in environmental engineering, may have found a solution to these problems. The researchers have combined both the RED and CapMix technologies in an electrochemical flow cell. "By combining the two methods, they end up giving you a lot more energy," Gorski said. The team constructed a custom-built flow cell in which two channels were separated by an anion-exchange membrane. A copper hexacyanoferrate electrode was then placed in each channel, and graphite foil was used as a current collector. The cell was then sealed using two end plates with bolts and nuts. Once built, one channel was fed with synthetic seawater, while the other channel was fed with synthetic freshwater. Periodically switching the water's flow paths allowed the cell to recharge and further produce power. From there, they examined how the cutoff voltage used for switching flow paths, external resistance and salt concentrations influenced peak and average power production. "There are two things going on here that make it work," said Gorski. "The first is you have the salt going to the electrodes. The second is you have the chloride transferring across the membrane. Since both of these processes generate a voltage, you end up developing a combined voltage at the electrodes and across the membrane." To determine the gained voltage of the flow cell depending on the type of membrane used and salinity difference, the team recorded open-circuit cell voltages while feeding two solutions at 15 milliliters per minute. Through this method, they identified that stacking multiple cells did influence electricity production. At 12.6 watts per square meter, this technology leads to peak power densities that are unprecedentedly high compared to previously reported RED (2.9 watts per square meter), and on par with the maximum calculated values for PRO (9.2 watts per square meter), but without the fouling problems. "What we've shown is that we can bring that power density up to what people have reported for pressure retarded osmosis and to a value much higher that what has been reported if you use these two processes alone," Gorski said. Though the results are promising, the researchers want to do more research on the stability of the electrodes over time and want to know how other elements in seawater— like magnesium and sulfate— might affect the performance of the cell. "Pursuing renewable energy sources is important," Gorski said. "If we can do carbon neutral energy, we should." Explore further: Battery can be recharged with carbon dioxide


— San Francisco is one of the quickest growing property markets in the country, and because of the numerous businesses and real estate developers in the area played host to last year’s ‘San Francisco State of the Market’ conference. New York-based property developer and online marketer Boris Mizhen attended the event, which was created by Bisnow, the industry’s leading news and events company, and started on January 20th with a talk by the keynote speaker, John Kilroy, Chairman, President, and CEO of the Kilroy Realty Corporation. Developers, investors, engineers, and local leaders met to discuss the issues that will shape global and local markets, including sustainability, the tech boom, and rising housing prices. The focus of the 2016 ‘San Francisco State of the Market’ conference was on the biggest real estate trend in the city - tech demand. In 2015, for comparison, at least 14 different companies signed leases, each at over 9,000 square feet, for research and creative office space; 60 percent of those leases were dedicated to businesses working on technology developments. San Francisco's real estate professionals discussed the most pressing question of whether the market can sustain such a rapid growth. Many experts are concerned that the commercial real estate bubble will burst, and while Boris Mizhen agrees that the high prices and fast growth will be difficult to sustain, he is optimistic about the year ahead. The top minds who are actively working on plans for growth spoke at 'San Francisco State of the Market', including the city's Planning Director, John Rahaim, and real estate business experts Ken Perry and Jack Sylvan, the CEO of the Swig Company and VP of Development at Forest City, respectively. The meeting agenda included talks on the City's Perspective and the Future of Office and Development. Another important discussion at the conference was the emphasis on future sustainable construction. Boris Mizhen has made careful planning and property improvement a cornerstone of his work as a real estate developer and manager, and was in attendance while executives discussed upcoming plans for further construction. San Francisco, long known for progressive thinking and leadership, will see a lot of work in this area in the near future, as the city’s developers and managers look for creative ways to boost the industry within a viable and environmental framework. Experts in sustainable engineering, including Nik Lahiri, President of Essel Environmental Engineering and Consulting, and Christian Agulles, Principal of PAE Consulting Engineers, spoke on the possibilities that lie ahead for the city. After the talk on Construction and Design, the meeting concluded with a late morning networking session. Now in its fourth year, Bisnow’s Bay Area trade show remains an event charged with excitement and optimism and has heralded a vibrant year in the commercial real estate market for San Francisco. Boris Mizhen is a New York-based entrepreneur that has proven himself as one of the country’s leading property developers, business strategists, and investors. He started his career in real estate after establishing himself as one of the most innovative online marketers in the world. Mizhen owns and manages dozens of successful properties across the North Eastern United States and is continuously looking for new ways to advance the workings of the real estate industry. His passion for buying and improving housing for people of differing economic backgrounds parallels his love for charitable work, including the Jewish Foundation of Greater New Haven and Chabad of the Shoreline, whose annual festival he has sponsored for over a decade. For more information, please visit http://www.borismizhennews.com


News Article | May 28, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Penn State researchers have created a new hybrid technology that produces unprecedented amounts of electrical power where seawater and freshwater combine at the coast. "The goal of this technology is to generate electricity from where the rivers meet the ocean," said Christopher Gorski, assistant professor in environmental engineering at Penn State. "It's based on the difference in the salt concentrations between the two water sources." That difference in salt concentration has the potential to generate enough energy to meet up to 40 percent of global electricity demands. Though methods currently exist to capture this energy, the two most successful methods, pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED), have thus far fallen short. PRO, the most common system, selectively allows water to transport through a semi-permeable membrane, while rejecting salt. The osmotic pressure created from this process is then converted into energy by turning turbines. "PRO is so far the best technology in terms of how much energy you can get out," Gorski said. "But the main problem with PRO is that the membranes that transport the water through foul, meaning that bacteria grows on them or particles get stuck on their surfaces, and they no longer transport water through them." This occurs because the holes in the membranes are incredibly small, so they become blocked easily. In addition, PRO doesn't have the ability to withstand the necessary pressures of super-salty waters. The second technology, RED, uses an electrochemical gradient to develop voltages across ion-exchange membranes. "Ion-exchange membranes only allow either positively charged ions to move through them or negatively charged ions," Gorski explained. "So only the dissolved salt is going through, and not the water itself." Here, the energy is created when chloride or sodium ions are kept from crossing ion-exchange membranes as a result of selective ion transport. Ion-exchange membranes don't require water to flow through them, so they don't foul as easily as the membranes used in PRO; however, the problem with RED is that it doesn't have the ability to produce large amounts of power. A third technology, capacitive mixing (CapMix), is a relatively new method also being explored. CapMix is an electrode-based technology that captures energy from the voltage that develops when two identical electrodes are sequentially exposed to two different kinds of water with varying salt concentrations, such as freshwater and seawater. Like RED, the problem with CapMix is that it's not able to yield enough power to be viable. Gorski, along with Bruce Logan, Evan Pugh Professor and the Stan and Flora Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering, and Taeyoung Kim, post-doctoral scholar in environmental engineering, may have found a solution to these problems. The researchers have combined both the RED and CapMix technologies in an electrochemical flow cell. "By combining the two methods, they end up giving you a lot more energy," Gorski said. The team constructed a custom-built flow cell in which two channels were separated by an anion-exchange membrane. A copper hexacyanoferrate electrode was then placed in each channel, and graphite foil was used as a current collector. The cell was then sealed using two end plates with bolts and nuts. Once built, one channel was fed with synthetic seawater, while the other channel was fed with synthetic freshwater. Periodically switching the water's flow paths allowed the cell to recharge and further produce power. From there, they examined how the cutoff voltage used for switching flow paths, external resistance and salt concentrations influenced peak and average power production. "There are two things going on here that make it work," said Gorski. "The first is you have the salt going to the electrodes. The second is you have the chloride transferring across the membrane. Since both of these processes generate a voltage, you end up developing a combined voltage at the electrodes and across the membrane." To determine the gained voltage of the flow cell depending on the type of membrane used and salinity difference, the team recorded open-circuit cell voltages while feeding two solutions at 15 milliliters per minute. Through this method, they identified that stacking multiple cells did influence electricity production. At 12.6 watts per square meter, this technology leads to peak power densities that are unprecedentedly high compared to previously reported RED (2.9 watts per square meter), and on par with the maximum calculated values for PRO (9.2 watts per square meter), but without the fouling problems. "What we've shown is that we can bring that power density up to what people have reported for pressure retarded osmosis and to a value much higher than what has been reported if you use these two processes alone," Gorski said. Though the results are promising, the researchers want to do more research on the stability of the electrodes over time and want to know how other elements in seawater -- like magnesium and sulfate -- might affect the performance of the cell. "Pursuing renewable energy sources is important," Gorski said. "If we can do carbon neutral energy, we should."


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Professor Satinder Kaur Brar of INRS Eau Terre Environnement Research Centre has been awarded the E3S Grand Prize in the category of University Research. The American Academy of Environmental Engineers (AAEES) presented the award in recognition of Dr. Brar's outstanding and groundbreaking research leading to the development of new hybrid technologies for removing emerging trace contaminants from drinking water and wastewater. Pharmaceutically active compounds are present in very low concentrations in air, water, and soil, where they may cause antibiotic resistance, fish feminization, and other disorders in other organisms. Wastewater treatment plants are very poor at breaking them down, hence the need to find new treatments to degrade those released in the air, water, and soil. Dr. Brar's team conducted many experiments that combined different treatment technologies with enzymes. Effectiveness was dramatically improved, thus showing the value of hybrid enzymatic treatment. The technology uses green chemistry principles, transforms emerging trace contaminants into innocuous compounds, and can be used for in-situ and ex-situ treatment of contaminated soils at lower cost. Dr. Brar is enthusiastic about her results. "These hybrid technologies have a lot of potential," she declared. "They're an affordable way for cities to keep their wastewater treatment systems secure by giving them the capacity to degrade plasticizers and other emerging contaminants, adapt to climate change, and ensure the health of the public." Dr. Brar is a noted authority in the field of pollution control and bioconversion. She received the award at the annual Excellence in Environmental Engineering and Science Awards Luncheon on April 13, 2017, at the National Press Club in Washington DC. The awards identify and reward the best in environmental engineering. On Professor Brar's team was researcher Rao Y. Surampalli with water sciences doctoral candidates D. Mohapatra, F. Gassara, G. S. Dhillon, R. Pulicharla, L. Lonappan, M. Taheran, R. K. Das, M. Nagdhi, and V. Pachapur, as well as postdoctoral fellows T. Rouissi, S. J. Sarma, and M. Cledon. Our heartiest congratulations to Dr. Brar and her team on their groundbreaking achievement that improves everyone's quality of life!


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Students in grades seven through twelve across Florida are preparing for the 62nd State Science and Engineering Fair of Florida (SSEF) from March 28-30, 2017 at the Lakeland Center (701 W Lime St). SSEF is a three-day display of science project exhibits prepared by aspiring scientists and engineers. SSEF finalists represent winners from the 36 regional fairs held across Florida earlier this year. Over 900 students, from both middle and high schools, across Florida will compete for over $1.2 million in awards, scholarships, internships and prizes, as well as several trips to represent Florida at national and international competitions. The top eight projects from the Senior division -grades nine through twelve- will represent Florida at the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles in May. SSEF will kick off on Tuesday, March 28 at 7:30 PM with the Opening Ceremony and JASON Colloquium at the Lakeland Center’s Youkey Theatre. This event will recognize students already selected to represent Florida at ISEF along with Florida’s Broadcom MASTERS Finalists from this past Fall. In addition, seven students will speak on the impact of science research on their lives. Judging will take place on Wednesday, March 29 and is not open to the public. Over 400 professionals across the fields of science, engineering and government volunteer their time to support the young scientists of SSEF. Judges may include university faculty and scientists, industrial engineers and scientists, representatives of private and federal research centers and agencies, medical researchers, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students. SSEF will culminate with the Grand Awards Ceremony on Thursday, March 30 from 7:00 – 10:00 PM in Jenkins Arena at the Lakeland Center. Awards will be given out to the best projects in the following categories: Animal Sciences; Behavioral & Social Sciences; Biomedical & Health Sciences; Cellular/Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Chemistry; Earth & Environmental Sciences; Engineering; Environmental Engineering; Intelligent Machines, Robotics and Systems Software; Mathematics and Computational Sciences; Microbiology; Physics & Astronomy; and Plant Sciences. Additional awards include: Special Awards donated by organizations/businesses and Scholarships and Opportunity Awards. The projects are open for public viewing on Wednesday, March 29, from 7:00 – 9:30 PM in the Exhibit Halls at the Lakeland Center. The media is invited to see Florida’s young innovators in action during at the following times at the Lakeland Center (all Media must check in with Nancy Besley, (407-473-8475): Tuesday, March 29 from 2:00 – 4:00 PM during Project – Set Up Tuesday, March 29 from 7:30 – 9:00 PM: Opening Ceremony and JASON Colloquium Wednesday, March 29, from 7:00 – 9:30 PM: Public Viewing Thursday, March 30 from 7:00 – 10:00 PM: Awards Ceremony Note: Media with prior authorization may view students with their projects 3:00 – 4:00 PM Wednesday, March 29th For more information on SSEF, visit ssefflorida.com or follow on the following social media platforms:


EMLab P&K Hosts IAQ Training Course by Indoor Sciences in San Francisco Bay Area EMLab P&K sponsors the Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course at its South San Francisco, California laboratory. The indoor air quality (IAQ) training course is taught by Ian Cull of Indoor Sciences. South San Francisco, CA, May 07, 2017 --( “We are happy to be partnering with Indoor Sciences to bring quality education and training to our clients in Northern California through the Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course,” said Dave Gallup, EMLab P&K’s General Manager and Co-Founder. “Indoor Sciences shares our goal at EMLab P&K to educate professionals and raise the standard of excellence throughout the environmental industry.” The Certified Indoor Environmentalist (CIE) Course will take place at 2000 Shoreline Court in Brisbane, CA at the Homewood Suites by Hilton on May 18-19, 2017. Followed by a tour of EMLab P&K’s South San Francisco laboratory, which is located at 6000 Shoreline Court, Suite 205, South San Francisco, CA 94080. Discounts are available for EMLab P&K clients and IAQA members. To register for the Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course, contact Indoor Sciences by email at info@indoorsciences.com or by phone at (312) 920-9393. Ian Cull, PE, CIH is an internationally-recognized speaker and consultant on topics related to indoor air quality, mold and building science. He is a Licensed Professional Engineer (PE) and Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) with two decades of experience and has in-depth knowledge in all aspects of IAQ, HVAC, building science, sampling and remediation. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Engineering from one of the country’s top Environmental Engineering programs at University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. He is the author of 50 classes available through the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) University. About Indoor Sciences, Inc. Indoor Sciences, Inc. is a training and consulting firm with a mission to make buildings healthy. Indoor Sciences is an approved training provider of the IAQA. Indoor Sciences is located in downtown Chicago with clients around the world. The company has trained thousands of indoor air quality professionals in its 13 years of business. About EMLab P&K EMLab P&K, a TestAmerica company, is the leading commercial indoor air quality laboratory in North America with over 60 service and drop-off locations throughout the United States. EMLab P&K specializes in analyzing air and surface samples to identify mold, bacteria, fungi, asbestos, and allergens. EMLab P&K also offers USP 797 testing, PCR testing, radon analysis, and materials testing. EMLab P&K has an extensive list of accreditations from leading organizations and government agencies including: AIHA, NVLAP, CA-ELAP, NY-ELAP, Texas DSHS, and other accrediting programs. For more information, visit the official website at http://www.emlab.com or call 866-888-6653. South San Francisco, CA, May 07, 2017 --( PR.com )-- EMLab P&K, a TestAmerica company and the leading commercial indoor air quality (IAQ) laboratory in North America, will be hosting Ian Cull of Indoor Sciences, Inc. to bring the Certified Indoor Environmentalist (CIE) Course to Northern California. The Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course is a comprehensive two-day training course taught by Ian Cull of Indoor Sciences. Course topics include: contaminants, health effects, building science, HVAC, inspections, sampling, remediation, standards and more. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate of completion from the IAQA, which is recognized for continuing education by organizations including ABIH, ACAC, and IICRC.“We are happy to be partnering with Indoor Sciences to bring quality education and training to our clients in Northern California through the Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course,” said Dave Gallup, EMLab P&K’s General Manager and Co-Founder. “Indoor Sciences shares our goal at EMLab P&K to educate professionals and raise the standard of excellence throughout the environmental industry.”The Certified Indoor Environmentalist (CIE) Course will take place at 2000 Shoreline Court in Brisbane, CA at the Homewood Suites by Hilton on May 18-19, 2017. Followed by a tour of EMLab P&K’s South San Francisco laboratory, which is located at 6000 Shoreline Court, Suite 205, South San Francisco, CA 94080. Discounts are available for EMLab P&K clients and IAQA members. To register for the Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course, contact Indoor Sciences by email at info@indoorsciences.com or by phone at (312) 920-9393.Ian Cull, PE, CIH is an internationally-recognized speaker and consultant on topics related to indoor air quality, mold and building science. He is a Licensed Professional Engineer (PE) and Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) with two decades of experience and has in-depth knowledge in all aspects of IAQ, HVAC, building science, sampling and remediation. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Engineering from one of the country’s top Environmental Engineering programs at University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. He is the author of 50 classes available through the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) University.About Indoor Sciences, Inc.Indoor Sciences, Inc. is a training and consulting firm with a mission to make buildings healthy. Indoor Sciences is an approved training provider of the IAQA. Indoor Sciences is located in downtown Chicago with clients around the world. The company has trained thousands of indoor air quality professionals in its 13 years of business.About EMLab P&KEMLab P&K, a TestAmerica company, is the leading commercial indoor air quality laboratory in North America with over 60 service and drop-off locations throughout the United States. EMLab P&K specializes in analyzing air and surface samples to identify mold, bacteria, fungi, asbestos, and allergens. EMLab P&K also offers USP 797 testing, PCR testing, radon analysis, and materials testing. EMLab P&K has an extensive list of accreditations from leading organizations and government agencies including: AIHA, NVLAP, CA-ELAP, NY-ELAP, Texas DSHS, and other accrediting programs. For more information, visit the official website at http://www.emlab.com or call 866-888-6653. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from EMLab P&K IAQ Laboratory


News Article | May 7, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, May 07, 2017 /24-7PressRelease/ -- EMLab P&K, a TestAmerica company and the leading commercial indoor air quality (IAQ) laboratory in North America, will be hosting Ian Cull of Indoor Sciences, Inc. to bring the Certified Indoor Environmentalist (CIE) Course to Northern California. The Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course is a comprehensive two-day training course taught by Ian Cull of Indoor Sciences. Course topics include: contaminants, health effects, building science, HVAC, inspections, sampling, remediation, standards and more. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate of completion from the IAQA, which is recognized for continuing education by organizations including ABIH, ACAC, and IICRC. "We are happy to be partnering with Indoor Sciences to bring quality education and training to our clients in Northern California through the Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course," said Dave Gallup, EMLab P&K's General Manager and Co-Founder. "Indoor Sciences shares our goal at EMLab P&K to educate professionals and raise the standard of excellence throughout the environmental industry." The Certified Indoor Environmentalist (CIE) Course will take place at 2000 Shoreline Court in Brisbane, CA at the Homewood Suites by Hilton on May 18-19, 2017. Followed by a tour of EMLab P&K's South San Francisco laboratory, which is located at 6000 Shoreline Court, Suite 205, South San Francisco, CA 94080. Discounts are available for EMLab P&K clients and IAQA members. To register for the Certified Indoor Environmentalist Course, contact Indoor Sciences by email at info@indoorsciences.com or by phone at (312) 920-9393. Ian Cull, PE, CIH is an internationally-recognized speaker and consultant on topics related to indoor air quality, mold and building science. He is a Licensed Professional Engineer (PE) and Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) with two decades of experience and has in-depth knowledge in all aspects of IAQ, HVAC, building science, sampling and remediation. He holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in Engineering from one of the country's top Environmental Engineering programs at University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana. He is the author of 50 classes available through the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) University. About Indoor Sciences, Inc. Indoor Sciences, Inc. is a training and consulting firm with a mission to make buildings healthy. Indoor Sciences is an approved training provider of the IAQA. Indoor Sciences is located in downtown Chicago with clients around the world. The company has trained thousands of indoor air quality professionals in its 13 years of business. EMLab P&K, a TestAmerica company, is the leading commercial indoor air quality laboratory in North America with over 60 service and drop-off locations throughout the United States. EMLab P&K specializes in analyzing air and surface samples to identify mold, bacteria, fungi, asbestos, and allergens. EMLab P&K also offers USP 797 testing, PCR testing, radon analysis, and materials testing. EMLab P&K has an extensive list of accreditations from leading organizations and government agencies including: AIHA, NVLAP, CA-ELAP, NY-ELAP, Texas DSHS, and other accrediting programs. For more information, visit the official website at http://www.emlab.com or call 866-888-6653.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

When people find out there are invisible particles in their food or water, they become alarmed. Arizona State University professor Paul Westerhoff has dedicated his career to producing research that answers people’s questions and moves them past fear. “The things I do are not from a scare-mongering point of view, but trying to answer objective engineering questions,” says Westerhoff, a professor of in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at ASU. Westerhoff, an environmental engineer, has been named one of three Regents' Professors for the 2016-2017 academic year. Regents’ Professor is the highest faculty honor and is conferred on full professors who have made remarkable achievements that have brought them national attention and international distinction. An expert in nanoparticles, Westerhoff started working on the tiny specks even before they had a name. As a graduate student, he worked on water filtration. “At that time we talked about these things called ‘sub-micron particles,’ which we couldn’t measure very well but we did a bunch of experiments with them anyway,” he says. A few years later, when the term “nano” was becoming popular, he realized he had already done it. “So I put in my first proposal, and it got funded because I was one of the first people who had data!” Now, he focuses on using nanoparticles to treat and purify water, an interest that was piqued by a hydrology class he took as an undergraduate. “I understand water,” he says. “I like fishing and swimming and kayaking, and I can go to a river and not only understand the hydrology. But I know why the water is a certain color. And I know where it came from. And I know all the fish that live in it.” From his first studies, he saw the trajectory of public perception about invisible and unknown substances in the environment, and how that could influence his research. “In the environmental world, initially it’s like the world’s going to end. But what I’ve learned is that these things move through predictable trends,” he says, using as an example “Silent Spring,” a 1962 book by conservationist Rachel Carson that documented the effects of the use of pesticides, including DDT. “It’s in this early stage that people are scared, while the agriculture industry and pesticide industry responded by saying that they save millions of lives. In the first few years there’s a lot of uncertainty,” he says. “Then researchers come along and help reduce that uncertainty. “Then there’s another phase where politics come in, and there are cost decisions and people think about regulations and finding alternatives,” he says. “We still find DDT in the environment, but it’s regulated and people really aren’t scared of it. It’s like a 20-year cycle.” Westerhoff says the key is to know which phase is coming next. “As a researcher you want to be focusing on what will be the important question to answer in three to five years, before people even know it’s a question,” he says. “In nano, we were ahead of the game in thinking, ‘Maybe this isn’t so bad, maybe we can use it.’” Now he’s deputy director of the Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment Systems Center, which is focused on developing compact, mobile, off-grid systems that can provide clean water to millions of people who lack it. Many of Westerhoff’s research projects have been funded by agencies such as the National Science Foundation and the Environmental Protection Agency, but he also works with water utilities, non-governmental organizations, and industry partners. “Industry wants to know the answers to things. It’s moved out of the scientific ‘what if’ toward reality,” he says. “They all have agendas and as long as you understand their agendas, they ask interesting questions.” Westerhoff was commissioned by the environmental activist group Friends of the Earth to see whether there were nanoparticles in powdered infant formula after the manufacturer declined to reveal whether there were. His lab found needle-shaped nanoparticles in the formula. “In Europe, there’s a warning on their use in cosmetics but yet they’re in infant formula,” he says. They discovered the nanoparticles did not dissolve in either water or saliva, but when they put them in stomach fluid, they dissolved instantly. “They did it to deliver calcium to the gut very efficiently, so they didn’t have to use as much,” he says of the manufacturer. Friends of Earth was concerned that the formula labels didn’t disclose the presences of nanoparticles. “That’s an example of where one group sees something as a risk to society but a company sees it as a benefit.” He’s also seen the evolution of how scientific research is portrayed in the media. In 2008, he supervised a doctoral student on a research project that studied the use of nanosilver in socks to eliminate stinky feet. They wanted to know: Did the particles wash out of the socks and into the water supply? The answer was yes. Journalists jumped all over the story. One headline read, “Toxic socks?” “We kept telling them the amount of silver is very small and won’t affect anything. None of them got it, and everything they wrote was over the top,” Westerhoff says. “They don’t want to hear that ‘everything is safe, there’s no problem.’ They want to hear ‘there’s nanoparticles in donuts.’” In 2015, Westerhoff was named an Outstanding Doctoral Mentor by ASU’s Graduate College. His former students said he is able to deftly balance the guidance that students crave with the independence they need to cultivate. Troy Benn, who worked with Westerhoff on the nanosilver paper and is now an engineer in Montana, says: “For a young kid it was a little bit shocking because you do all your research in a lab and you don’t talk to anyone outside, and all of a sudden people are asking you what you did. “Paul’s good at knowing how much guidance each student needs because they’re all unique.” Kyle Doudrick, who was a graduate student at ASU from 2008 to 2013, says that even with the enormous workload of a full professor, including travel, plus the administrative duties of a vice provost, Westerhoff found time to meet weekly with the students he advised. “It was a good balance of managing but also letting you find yourself in your independence but not so hands off that you had no idea what’s going on,” says Doudrick, who is now an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. “The research I did was on nitrate as a contaminant in water,” he says. “He wasn’t the expert but what he was good at was making the student the expert, and that’s the whole purpose of the PhD, is to become an expert at something.” Even now, Westerhoff teaches ASU 101, the required, one-credit course that all first-time freshmen take. “I ask them why they want to be engineers, and about half have a life story of something they want to solve. They have a deep passion. “And if you don’t hear that until you see them in grad school, you’ve lost touch with what motivates people.”

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