Gatineau, Canada

Environment Canada

www.ec.gc.ca
Gatineau, Canada

Environment Canada , legally incorporated as the Department of the Environment under the Department of the Environment Act , is the department of the Government of Canada with responsibility for coordinating environmental policies and programs as well as preserving and enhancing the natural environment and renewable resources. The powers, duties and functions of the Minister of the Environment extend to and include matters relating to: "preserve and enhance the quality of the natural environment, including water, air, soil, flora and fauna; conserve Canada's renewable resources; conserve and protect Canada's water resources;forecast daily weather conditions and warnings, and provide detailed meteorological information to all of Canada; enforce rules relating to boundary waters; and coordinate environmental policies and programs for the federal government."Its ministerial headquarters is located in les Terrasses de la Chaudière, Gatineau, Quebec.Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act , Environment Canada became the lead federal department to ensure the cleanup of hazardous waste and oil spills for which the government is responsible, and to provide technical assistance to other jurisdictions and the private sector as required. The department is also responsible for international environmental issues . CEPA was the central piece of Canada's environmental legislation but was replaced when budget implementation bill entered into effect in June 2012.Under the Constitution of Canada, responsibility for environmental management in Canada is a shared responsibility between the federal government and provincial/territorial governments. For example, provincial governments have primary authority for resource management including permitting industrial waste discharges . The federal government is responsible for the management of toxic substances in the country . Environment Canada provides stewardship of the Environmental Choice Program, which provides consumers with an eco-labelling for products manufactured within Canada or services that meet international label standards of Global Ecolabelling Network.Environment Canada continues to undergo a structural transformation to centralize authority and decision-making, and to standardize policy implementation. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

One of Rick Levick's earliest memories is seeing two smooshed snapping turtles along a causeway that cuts through this at-risk reptile's wetland habitat, Lake Erie's Long Point peninsula in southern Ontario, where he's been cottaging since 1956. In 2006, he helped launch a fight to save these critters—and after ten long years, it's a stunning success in protecting animals and their habitats, one that came from the grassroots. The Long Point Causeway, which allows tourists and cottagers access to Lake Erie's famous sandy beaches, was constructed in the 1920s. Surveys performed by the Canadian Wildlife Service indicate that, since 1979, there have been years where about 10,000 animals were killed by cars zooming along this 3.6 kilometre (two-mile) stretch of road. It's right on the border of the Big Creek National Wildlife Area, which is a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve. "This whole project came together when some concerned citizens called a meeting and presented the problem to a group representing all kinds of different community organizations and government agencies," Levick told Motherboard in a phone call. "'We've been running over turtles for years,so why bother?' That's probably what they said before the buffalo disappeared." That was the beginning of a remarkable effort described in a study published today in the Wildlife Society Bulletin. The paper, by McMaster University biologist Chantel Markle, shows that road mortality of endangered reptiles has gone down 89 percent after fencing and culverts (dug-out tunnels that allow the turtles access to the sandy beaches where they lay their eggs) were installed along the Long Point Causeway. The final culvert was installed this January. "It was a problem we were all aware of. If you lived in the Long Point area and if you were a cottager like myself, you've seen turtles killed on the road for years," said Levick. Between the years 2008 and 2010, 6,000 meters of fencing was installed along the roadway. The area is home to many threatened and endangered creatures, like the Blanding's turtle, the ribbonsnake, and the snapping turtle. These critters don't just face threat from road mortality: it's illegal to harm, collect, buy, or sell them. The team who built the tunnels and fences to protect these animals have even kept many specifics under wraps, to avoid tipping off potential poachers. This has been successful so far, but it wasn't all smooth sailing. "We did have some opposition," said Levick. "It was people very skeptical that we could do anything that said: 'Well we've been running over turtles for years, and they're still here, so why bother?' Of course, that's probably what they said just before the buffalo disappeared." Other residents were worried about the cost of the project, which ended up being about $2.7 million spread out over ten years. But Levick and his group found creative ways to fund the effort, with grants from Environment Canada and the US National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. An illustrated children's book by a local resident, called Never Give Up, has also helped raise funds. Only a small portion of the cost came from local coffers. Read More: Millions of Canadian Lakes Could Hold Clues About Ancient Life These turtles can live for up to 90 years, so it's hard to quantify right now exactly how much the population has bounced back. But the average number of turtles heading onto the road is down by 89 percent, and snakes are down by 28 percent. Markle hopes that these techniques can be brought into other areas that threaten local wildlife. She told me the trial and error that this one community went through—a decade of effort, and a price tag of $2.7 million—can save others similar time and effort in the future. The study also helped discover "how best to monitor this type of work," Markle explained. "How many years you should be doing it for? What type of equipment to monitor the culverts with?" Markle sees the Long Point project as a sort of citizen science that gets results. The community embraced the efforts, reaching out the to the research team when they observed turtles on their yard and properties. "It was a really great opportunity to meet the local people as well as the tourists who are coming in and enjoying the trails, and checking out the park and the marsh," she explained. "We would get to talk to them and share our work on a day-to-day, person-to-person basis, which was amazing." Now, with all this work, there's a lot more harmony between the human and animal residents of Long Point peninsula, a harmony that can be shared with others. Subscribe to Science Solved It, Motherboard's new show about the greatest mysteries that were solved by science.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

For species where both parents work together to raise their offspring, cooperation is key -- it's as true for birds as it is for us! A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows how pairs of Common Murres update each other on their condition so that when one partner needs a break, the other can pick up the slack. Common Murre parents trade duties throughout the day -- one stays at the nest while the other leaves to forage, hopefully coming back with a fish for the chick. Because brooding the chick requires much less energy than foraging, staying at the nest is preferable for a bird that's in poor condition. Linda Takahashi, Anne Storey, and Carolyn Walsh of Newfoundland's Memorial University, along with Sabina Wilhelm of the Canadian Wildlife Service, studied the "turn-taking ceremony" that parents perform when they switch places. They found that the time they spend preening each other provides a way for the two birds to exchange information about how they're doing, so that if one is in poor shape the other can compensate. The researchers observed 16 pairs of murres with chicks on an island off the coast of Newfoundland in summer 2009, recording their behavior when parents switched duties at the nest and capturing the birds to check their body condition. Their results show that these "nest relief" interactions take longer when one partner is especially low in body mass, suggesting that when brooders withhold preening and stall their departure, they're letting their mates know that they need more time to rest; the returning mate can then compensate by going off to forage again rather than trading places immediately. Similarly, the brooding mate might let a struggling returner take over take over at the nest even if they haven't brought back a fish. "We had been doing murre field work for years in Witless Bay studying reproductive and parental behavior, and we became intrigued with the variation that we saw among pairs in their nest relief behaviors," says Walsh. "Some nest reliefs were short and businesslike, while other nest reliefs seemed to involve a lot of interaction between the mates, and it took a long time for the mates to exchange brooding duty. When Linda Takahashi came to Memorial University as a master's degree student, we decided that her project should focus on getting the details about this very interesting variation in murre nest relief behaviors." "The roles of avian pair members have been much studied in terms of energy investment and food delivery, but we are accustomed to thinking of these problems in terms of evolutionary tradeoffs. The ways in which contributions are actually negotiated within individual pairs has, until recently, been largely overlooked," according to longtime seabird researcher Tony Gaston of Environment Canada. "Linda Takahashi's paper addresses this deficiency, and this is a field which promises to open up additional avenues of research on within-pair communication." "Turn-taking ceremonies in a colonial seabird: Does behavioral variation signal individual condition?" will be available April 26, 2017, at http://americanornithologypubs. (issue URL http://americanornithologypubs. ). About the journal: The Auk: Ornithological Advances is a peer-reviewed, international journal of ornithology that began in 1884 as the official publication of the American Ornithologists' Union, which merged with the Cooper Ornithological Society in 2016 to become the American Ornithological Society. In 2009, The Auk was honored as one of the 100 most influential journals of biology and medicine over the past 100 years.


News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: phys.org

Common Murre parents share information about their condition and compensate when one is struggling. Credit: L. Takahashi For species where both parents work together to raise their offspring, cooperation is key—it's as true for birds as it is for us! A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows how pairs of Common Murres update each other on their condition so that when one partner needs a break, the other can pick up the slack. Common Murre parents trade duties throughout the day—one stays at the nest while the other leaves to forage, hopefully coming back with a fish for the chick. Because brooding the chick requires much less energy than foraging, staying at the nest is preferable for a bird that's in poor condition. Linda Takahashi, Anne Storey, and Carolyn Walsh of Newfoundland's Memorial University, along with Sabina Wilhelm of the Canadian Wildlife Service, studied the "turn-taking ceremony" that parents perform when they switch places. They found that the time they spend preening each other provides a way for the two birds to exchange information about how they're doing, so that if one is in poor shape the other can compensate. The researchers observed 16 pairs of murres with chicks on an island off the coast of Newfoundland in summer 2009, recording their behavior when parents switched duties at the nest and capturing the birds to check their body condition. Their results show that these "nest relief" interactions take longer when one partner is especially low in body mass, suggesting that when brooders withhold preening and stall their departure, they're letting their mates know that they need more time to rest; the returning mate can then compensate by going off to forage again rather than trading places immediately. Similarly, the brooding mate might let a struggling returner take over take over at the nest even if they haven't brought back a fish. "We had been doing murre field work for years in Witless Bay studying reproductive and parental behavior, and we became intrigued with the variation that we saw among pairs in their nest relief behaviors," says Walsh. "Some nest reliefs were short and businesslike, while other nest reliefs seemed to involve a lot of interaction between the mates, and it took a long time for the mates to exchange brooding duty. When Linda Takahashi came to Memorial University as a master's degree student, we decided that her project should focus on getting the details about this very interesting variation in murre nest relief behaviors." "The roles of avian pair members have been much studied in terms of energy investment and food delivery, but we are accustomed to thinking of these problems in terms of evolutionary tradeoffs. The ways in which contributions are actually negotiated within individual pairs has, until recently, been largely overlooked," according to longtime seabird researcher Tony Gaston of Environment Canada. "Linda Takahashi's paper addresses this deficiency, and this is a field which promises to open up additional avenues of research on within-pair communication." Explore further: Why do guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can fly? More information: "Turn-taking ceremonies in a colonial seabird: Does behavioral variation signal individual condition?" April 26, 2017, americanornithologypubs.org/doi/full/10.1642/AUK-17-26.1


Leveraging subnational climate action in an age of populism: What the world can learn from Canada Those working to step up climate action in countries where governments are hostile to their message should take note of the Canadian example, explains the author of this post. They should feel optimistic about the progress seen in job creation and economic affordability in the renewables sector and understand that a future federal climate plan will work best when it is built upon a foundation of subnational support structures. "Canada is back, my friends," Prime Minister Justin Trudeau boldly declared at the Paris Climate Summit back in November 2015. The quote went viral on social media, as progressive Canadians collectively exhaled after nine years of conservative leadership and inaction on climate change under Stephen Harper. As a Canadian and a regular at UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiation meetings, the shift was remarkable. For years, I endured questions from colleagues and friends from other countries: “We’re making progress here this week, why is Canada blocking? I thought you were the good guys!” Then, quite suddenly, we were seeing re-engagement with the climate negotiation process, funding for renewable energy initiatives, and rebranding the federal environment department from “Environment Canada” to “Environment and Climate Change Canada.” Naturally, some were dubious and wanted to know if this was just good public relations or a real commitment to take action. While things generally do look good in Canada, with the current tide of populism washing across much of the world, it may be interesting to look at where Canada went for those nine years. While firmly right of centre by Canadian standards, Stephen Harper was not of the ilk of the populist demagogues we’ve seen embraced in many countries of late. But modern conservative doctrine tends to be overwhelmingly coupled to the idea that climate action is something to be sceptical of. This partisan polarisation when it comes to climate change is something many in the climate community are trying to bring an end to — and we’re seeing progress in some circles. In fact, it’s becoming increasingly clear that climate change does not hold as much sway among angry populist voters as once believed. Early in the 2016 US presidential race, it was thought that Donald Trump was going to make his presidential bid at least partly a referendum on climate change. From his threats to withdraw the US from the Paris Agreement to his infamous tweet claiming that climate change was a concept “created by and for the Chinese in order to make US manufacturing non-competitive,” climate action was framed as an obstacle to economic progress. At some point, however, Republican strategists must have calculated that climate change was not an issue that was going to win them the election. In fact, it was hardly brought up as an issue in the later stages of the campaign trail. As most observers expected, climate change has not been ignored as an issue in the first 100 days of the Trump administration. The appointment of Scott Pruitt, a vocal climate denier, as head of the Environmental Protection Agency leaves nothing to the imagination as to what Trump thinks about climate specifically and the environment more broadly. But Trump appears to be softening his stance on the Paris Agreement, with a final decision tentatively expected in time for this month’s G7 summit in Taormina, Italy. Whether this is the result of recommendations from advisors, a recognition of the economic potential of the green jobs sector, or fear of China cementing itself as the global leader on climate action remains to be seen. Canada wrestled with similar issues under the Harper Government and still managed to maintain strong grassroots support for tackling climate change — even if this was not expressed officially at the global level. Early in his tenure, Harper spoke the language of diplomacy on climate change, once calling it “perhaps the biggest threat to confront the future of humanity today” and even calling for less talk and more action. Such strong words slowly disappeared during his time in office and were replaced by noticeable silence at the highest level, strategic political manoeuvring to silence government-employed scientists and researchers, and the appointment of key people with an agenda to block progress on climate change. The most memorable appointment, perhaps, was Joe Oliver as Natural Resources Minister, who claimed in an interview that “scientists have recently told us that our fears (on climate change) are exaggerated” and that groups who oppose Canada’s often criticised oilsands industry were foreign funded radicals. With virtually no opportunities to influence federal policy on climate change and few sources of funding to undertake research, several NGOs closed up shop in Ottawa. “These are dark days,” one Ottawa-based climate researcher whispered to me at COP17 in Durban in 2011. But the fight for climate action in Canada didn’t end with a hostile government. It simply changed venues. Think tanks and NGOs intensified their efforts on influencing provincial and municipal governments to adopt strong policies that would ensure that greenhouse gas emissions would be reined in – despite federal policies. Action by Canadian provinces through those “dark days” was remarkable. Hard work from NGOs, aboriginal groups, and other civil society organisations managed to even lay the groundwork for a remarkably ambitious Climate Leadership Plan in Alberta, home to Canada’s oilsands. All of this set the stage for the Trudeau government’s historic Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change — a bold agenda with a range of ambitious climate change policies, including a requirement that all Canadian provinces implement a carbon pricing mechanism. Canada, of course, was not the first to wade in to leveraging subnational governments for climate action. Perhaps the best-known example came when the states of Arizona, California, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington — looking to make progress under the climate hostile George W. Bush Administration — banded together to create the Western Climate Initiative. While all states but California have since dropped out of the initiative (and several Canadian provinces have joined), recent years have seen a fundamental shift in the way the economics of climate change is understood. And that shift could be a game changer. Renewable energy is generating jobs and becoming more and more affordable. And the shift in this direction is gaining momentum by the week, it seems. Renewable energy sectors are expanding quickly in jurisdictions previously known for their oil and gas production, including the Canadian province of Alberta as well as the US state of Texas, which has added more wind-based capacity than any other state. Meanwhile, Trump’s bluster on re-invigorating the coal sector — a major contributor to climate change and air pollution — may have resonated with out-of-work coal workers who are increasingly worried over lost income, healthcare, and pensions. However, industry is finding it increasingly difficult to turn a profit, which may prompt a closer look at transitioning to more sustainable energy sources, while finding ways to boost employment in coal mining communities. Those working to step up climate action in countries where governments are hostile to their message should take note of the Canadian example, feel optimistic about the progress we’ve seen in job creation and economic affordability in the renewables sector, and understand that a future federal climate plan will work best when it is built upon a foundation of subnational support structures. Cross-regional and cross-national collaboration will be crucial to moving the planet to the next level on climate action. Alliances such as those seen between Canadian provinces and California on carbon pricing are ideal as they can drive ambition and encourage jurisdictions to lock in progress. This may be particularly important in Europe, where possible exits from the European Union may leave the Emissions Trading System on questionable ground. On the wider international stage, the upcoming G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, this July could send a powerful signal that the world’s major economies remain committed to tackling the climate challenge. Representing some 80 percent of energy-related carbon emissions and around 75 percent of international trade, a collaboration among this group would go a long way in helping to secure a clean energy future for the world. Andrew Aziz is Communications Director at the Pembina Institute, a clean energy think tank based in Calgary, Canada.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Soldiers help residents of Pierrefonds after heavy flooding caused by unrelenting rain (AFP Photo/Catherine Legault) Montreal (Canada) (AFP) - With heavy rains persisting and waters still rising over much of waterlogged eastern Canada, the nation's military tripled the number of troops urgently working to evacuate thousands of residents. Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre declared a state of emergency for his city, allowing authorities to order mandatory evacuations from threatened areas. "The next 48 hours will be decisive," Coderre told reporters. Evacuations were ordered in Pierrefonds, on the northwestern shore of the island of Montreal, after three temporary dikes ruptured, sending water levels surging. A combination of torrential rains and runoff from melting snow has caused rivers to overflow their banks from Ottawa to Montreal, posing critical challenges for people already exhausted by weeks of seemingly unending rainfall. More than 1,000 people have been evacuated in Quebec province, the largest number coming from Gatineau, near Ottawa, the province's emergency response unit said Sunday. More than 2,000 homes have been flooded and 140 towns and cities affected, with authorities urging residents to evacuate before it is too late. In addition to Montreal, eight localities declared states of emergency. But Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard warned the worst was yet to come. "The water will continue rising over the next two or three days," he said Saturday after visiting the town of Rigaud, west of Montreal, which has been flooded for more than a week. Water levels were rising across much of an area of some 500 kilometers (300 miles), from Toronto and Lake Ontario and stretching downstream along the St. Lawrence River. The Ministry of Public Safety said waters were expected to crest sometime Monday in Quebec province. Some 450 troops had been dispatched by Saturday to help put sandbags in place and assist with evacuations. But that number was set to triple by the end of Sunday, including 500 in the immediate Montreal region, 400 in the area between Gatineau and Rigaud to the west, and more than 500 in the Trois-Rivieres region northeast of Montreal, said Lieutenant Colonel Pascal Larose. Their tasks included evacuating residents, reinforcing dikes and protecting critical infrastructure such as water treatment plants and bridges, the ministry of defense said. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau traveled Sunday to Terrasse-Vaudreuil, about 40 kilometers west of Montreal, to survey damage, a spokesman said. Environment Canada warned that "the ground, already near saturation, has little ability to absorb further rainfall." "Even shallow, fast-moving water across a road can sweep a vehicle or a person away," it said. "Don't approach washouts near rivers, creeks and culverts." - Not seen since 1974 - Pierrefonds resident Robert Robillard had yet to evacuate by Sunday, despite the 10 to 15 centimeters (four to six inches) of water in his basement. "I haven't seen anything like this since 1974," he said, adding that the area now is much more crowded and thus vulnerable. In Rigaud, Mayor Hans Gruenwald ordered the mandatory evacuation of some 100 homes. After three weeks of flooding, "our people no longer have the physical capacity or the morale, so I took the initiative to evacuate them," he told the LCN network. Floodwaters have made 400 roads impassable, and several schools will be closed Monday. School gymnasiums and other public buildings throughout the area have opened their doors to evacuees. "I understand people are reluctant to leave their homes," Couillard said, "but if you're asked, do it for your own safety." Meanwhile, in British Columbia on the opposite side of the country, the same combination of rain and snowmelt has caused flooding and mudslides that left at least two people missing, including the fire chief of the village of Cache Creek who had been out checking water levels. A 76-year-old man was missing after a mudslide Saturday swept away his home in the community of Tappen, CBC reported. First responders rushed to the scene but were forced to pull back. "It sounded like a freight train coming down the mountain," Tappen-Sunnybrae Fire Department Chief Kyle Schneider told the broadcaster.


Boer G.J.,Environment Canada
Climate Dynamics | Year: 2011

Decadal prediction of the coupled climate system is potentially possible given enough information and knowledge. Predictability will reside in both externally forced and in long timescale internally generated variability. The "potential predictability" investigated here is characterized by the fraction of the total variability accounted for by these two components in the presence of short-timescale unpredictable "noise" variability. Potential predictability is not a classical measure of predictability nor a measure of forecast skill but it does identify regions where long timescale variability is an appreciable fraction of the total and hence where prediction on these scale may be possible. A multi-model estimate of the potential predictability variance fraction (ppvf) as it evolves through the first part of the twenty-first century is obtained using simulation data from the CMIP3 archive. Two estimates of potential predictability are used which depend on the treatment of the forced component. The multi-decadal estimate considers the magnitude of the forced component as the change from the beginning of the century and so becomes largely a measure of climate change as the century progresses. The next-decade estimate considers the change in the forced component from the past decade and so is more pertinent to an actual forecast for the next decade. Long timescale internally generated variability provides additional potential predictability beyond that of the forced component. The ppvf may be expressed in terms of a signal-to-noise ratio and takes on values between 0 and 1. The largest values of the ppvf for temperature are found over tropical and mid-latitude oceans, with the exception of the equatorial Pacific, and some but not all tropical land areas. Overall the potential predictability for temperature generally declines with latitude and is relatively low over mid- to high-latitude land. Potential predictability for precipitation is generally low and due almost entirely to the forced component and then mainly at high latitudes. To the extent that the multi-model ppvf reflects both the behaviour of the actual climate system and the possibility of decadal prediction, the results give some indication as to where and to what extent decadal forecasts might be possible. © 2010 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.


Reiner E.J.,Environment Canada
Mass Spectrometry Reviews | Year: 2010

The analysis of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, and other related compounds requires complex sample preparation and analytical procedures using highly sensitive and selective stateof-the-art instrumentation to meet very stringent data quality objectives. The analytical procedures (extraction, sample preparation), instrumentation (chromatographic separation and detection by mass spectrometry) and screening techniques for the determination of dioxins, furans, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and related compounds with a focus on new approaches and alternate techniques to standard regulatory methods are reviewed. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.,.


Patent
Environment Canada | Date: 2016-06-13

A process for isolating at least one target compound, such as manool, geranyl linalool, ethyl guaiacol, eugenol, veratraldehyde, squalene, terpin, cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, stigmastenol and dehydroabietic acid, from biomass, the process including steps of: obtaining a condensate from a recovery evaporator, a reverse osmosis retentate of a condensate of a pulp and paper mill, or both, the condensate, retentate or both being substantially free of higher molecular weight (approximately >1000 Da) cellulose and/or lignin and/or lignin-derived material; optionally pH adjusting and filtering the condensate to collect insoluble material; extracting the condensate, the collected insoluble material, or both, with solid phase extraction (SPE), liquid-liquid extraction or solid-liquid extraction to produce an extract containing the at least one target compound; and optionally purifying the extract containing the at least one target compound by thermal fractionation, chromatographic separation, recrystallization ion exchange, chelation, adsorption/desorption, lyophilization and sublimation or combinations thereof. The method is particularly useful for isolating the target compounds from wastewaters produced in a kraft pulp and paper mill, especially from recovery evaporator condensates produced during the treatment of black liquor.


Patent
Environment Canada | Date: 2015-03-05

A process for isolating at least one target compound, such as manool, geranyl linalool, ethyl guaiacol, eugenol, veratraldehyde, squalene, terpin, cholesterol, beta-sitosterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, stigmastenol and dehydroabietic acid, from biomass, the process including steps of: obtaining a condensate from a recovery evaporator, a reverse osmosis retentate of a condensate of a pulp and paper mill, or both, the condensate, retentate or both being substantially free of higher molecular weight (approximately >1000 Da) cellulose and/or lignin and/or lignin-derived material; optionally pH adjusting and filtering the condensate to collect insoluble material; extracting the condensate, the collected insoluble material, or both, with solid phase extraction (SPE), liquid-liquid extraction or solid-liquid extraction to produce an extract containing the at least one target compound; and optionally purifying the extract containing the at least one target compound by thermal fractionation, chromatographic separation, recrystallization ion exchange, chelation, adsorption/desorption, lyophilization and sublimation or combinations thereof. The method is particularly useful for isolating the target compounds from wastewaters produced in a kraft pulp and paper mill, especially from recovery evaporator condensates produced during the treatment of black liquor.


Patent
Environment Canada | Date: 2015-02-06

Provided are decontamination compositions that include an ammonium compound, a ferric/ferrocyanide compound, a polyaminocarboxylic acid compound and a polycarboxylic compound. Depending on the mode of application, the compositions can be used as foams, liquids, gels, strippable coatings, mists, or in other forms. Also provided are kits that include such components in whole or in part along with an optional dispersing device for use of the decontamination composition.

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