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News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.sej.org

"As more people find themselves living near oil and gas wells, scientists scramble to fully understand the health risks." "Every medical student learns this much Latin: primum non nocere: “First, do no harm.” For centuries, all newly minted physicians have taken the Hippocratic Oath before treating any patients. This central tenet dictates that a practitioner follow two mandates: to strive to do good, or at least do no harm. It appears to some scientists, politicians and residents that Colorado’s top medical officials, tasked with protecting residents’ health, never received the memo. Many residents on the Front Range fear that the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), especially Dr. Larry Wolk, the department’s executive director and chief medical officer, are violating this fundamental pillar of the medical profession when it comes to protecting the public from the known and potential health impacts of oil and gas development. Some scientists who study air emissions and health impacts associated with living near unconventional oil and gas operations also question whether the health department is following basic principles of scientific integrity." Susan Moran reports for the Boulder Weekly May 18, 2017.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"This investment in leaders in rural and urban counties across the state is a smart way to strengthen the systems that serve our communities," said Governor John Hickenlooper. "We look forward to seeing the impact this inaugural class will have on Colorado children and families." For bios and photos of all 20 outstanding leaders, visit http://ascend.aspeninstitute.org These leaders are on the front lines of new solutions to transform the culture and systems that serve children and families in Colorado. Among their strategies: The Fellows reflect the diversity and talent of Colorado and significant opportunities to invest in children and families : "It is a privilege to bring the Aspen Institute's values-based leadership approach back to its roots in Colorado, where it all started," said Institute President and CEO Walter Isaacson. "More importantly, this Fellowship is a critical investment in advancing opportunity and equality in America for the children and families who need it the most." "The Colorado Children and Families Fellows are diverse, entrepreneurial leaders implementing bold ideas to change the lives of young children and their families throughout Colorado," said Anne Mosle, vice president, the Aspen Institute, and executive director, Ascend at the Aspen Institute. "Too many families are struggling; the Aspen Institute is committed to ensuring that all children have the chance to reach their full potential." The Colorado Children and Families Fellowship builds on the best of the Aspen Institute leadership tradition. Fellows work with inspirational leaders; participate in signature Institute convenings and platforms; tap powerful networks of social justice; and carry out action plans that advance their work on behalf of children and families. The Fellowship is made possible through the generous support of the Ben and Lucy Ana Fund of the Walton Family Foundation. : Phyllis Albritton, Director, Office of Economic Security, Colorado Department of Human Services Erin Brown, Executive Director, Office of Children's Affairs, City and County of Denver Matthew Dodson, Director, Archuleta County Department of Human Services Verónica Figoli, President and CEO, Denver Public Schools Foundation Tony Gherardini, Deputy Executive Director of Operations, Colorado Department of Human Services Tista Ghosh, Deputy Chief Medical Officer and Director, Public Health Programs, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Gretchen Hammer, Medicaid Director, Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing Nikki Hatch, Regional Administrator, Region 8, Administration of Children and Families Bill Jaeger, Vice President, Early Childhood Initiatives, Colorado Children's Campaign Deidre Johnson, CEO and Executive Director, The Center for African-American Health Liane Jollon, Executive Director, San Juan Basin Public Health Mark Kling, Executive Director, Family Resource Center Association Jeff Kuhr, Executive Director, Mesa County Health Department Don Mares, Executive Director, Denver Department of Human Services Michael Niyompong, Chief Operating Officer, Clayton Early Learning Stephanie Seng, Director, Center for Marriage and Family Therapy and Child Trauma and Resilience Assessment Center, Colorado State University Mary Anne Snyder, Director, Office of Early Childhood, Colorado Department of Human Services Cheryl Ternes, Director, Arapahoe County Department of Human Services Stephanie Villafuerte, Child Protection Ombudsman of Colorado Scott Wasserman, President, The Bell Policy Center Ascend at the Aspen Institute is the national hub for breakthrough ideas and collaborations that move children and their parents toward educational success, economic security, and health and well-being. We embrace a commitment to racial equity and a gender lens. For more information, visit http://ascend.aspeninstitute.org The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, DC. Its mission is to foster leadership based on enduring values and to provide a nonpartisan venue for dealing with critical issues. The Institute is based in Washington, DC; Aspen, Colorado; and on the Wye River on Maryland's Eastern Shore. It also has offices in New York City and an international network of partners. For more information, visit www.aspeninstitute.org To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/visionary-leaders-fuel-advances-in-opportunity-for-colorado-children-and-families-300458691.html


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Denver, Colorado, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- With tensions rising around health care access in the United States, it’s easy to get discouraged. Yet here in Colorado, there’s a growing movement for healthy change that is helping advance healthy eating and active living (HEAL) policies in communities across the state. Since 2013, LiveWell Colorado’s HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign has worked with municipalities to adopt and implement more than 100 policies and infrastructure investments that increase access to biking, walking, recreation, healthy food, and healthy workplaces—attributes that make communities healthier and more economically successful. Colorado is one of five states in the national HEAL Cities Campaign founded and funded by Kaiser Permanente. The Colorado Campaign is a partnership between the Colorado Municipal League and LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit working to increase access to healthy eating and active living by removing barriers that inequitably and disproportionately affect low-income communities and people of color. The Campaign provides free training, tools, and support to help municipal leaders adopt and implement policies in three key areas: active community, healthy food access, and healthy workplace. Since its launch four years ago, the HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign has spread to urban, suburban, and rural communities in every region of Colorado. With the addition of Sterling and Timnath earlier this month, LiveWell Colorado reached a major milestone—50 participating HEAL municipalities. This means the Campaign is now reaching more than half of our state's total population. “Cities all over the state are doing amazing work and it varies from place to place, as each municipality has its own unique attributes and challenges,” says Julie George, LiveWell Colorado’s HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign Director. “I love La Junta’s plan to install signage at the train stop, informing passengers about where and how close Main Street is. The signs will encourage them to take a short walk, patronize the local businesses, and enjoy a bit of La Junta during their stop. And in Cortez, they’ve changed zoning to allow vegetable gardens in their right of ways and then tied the care and upkeep of these gardens to their summer program for kids. The examples go on and on.” While the Campaign is made to be flexible in order to work with all municipalities, LiveWell has also placed a particular focus on reaching communities with high poverty levels, where residents are more likely to experience socioeconomic and environmental disadvantages that contribute to poor health. For example, with 19 percent of its residents living below the poverty level, Commerce City faces a number of challenges from homelessness to economic and food insecurity. “Focusing on health can be a real challenge, especially for those in our community who are struggling to make ends meet,” says City Manager Brian McBroom. Since joining the HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign in 2013, Commerce City has made great strides to improve quality of life for its residents. “The city has put many of the Campaign’s tenets to use by enacting policies that have resulted in new parks and recreational spaces, an enhanced network of local food pantries, and Complete Streets strategies,” says McBroom. In June 2016, Commerce City became the first municipality to reach Elite status—the highest of four levels in the Campaign. Elite cities are those that have adopted five or more HEAL policies. Arvada also joined the ranks of Elite cities in October 2016. “Through HEAL Cities & Towns, the city of Arvada has received critical guidance, particularly on ways to increase urban agriculture and healthy food access,” says City Manager Mark Deven. Arvada also secured one of seven HEAL Cities & Towns mini-grants in 2016, which provided funds for the city to conduct a healthy food assessment. “This valuable effort would not be possible without the Campaign’s support, and will go a long way toward helping us reach our goals for creating a healthy, vibrant community,” Deven says. Colorado Springs, the second-largest city in the state, recently achieved Fit status, the third of four levels in the Campaign. “Since becoming a HEAL city in 2014, Colorado Springs has moved several policies forward and embraced the importance of providing a healthy environment for our residents,” says President Pro Tempore Tem Jill Gaebler. “We formed a Food Policy Advisory Board and are working hard to increase access to healthy food, and have also furthered our active transportation goals by embracing the Complete Streets model.” “We are grateful to work with so many extraordinary partners around the state, including the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment as well as the Colorado Municipal League and their membership,” says LiveWell President and CEO, Gabriel Guillaume.  “Our overall aim is to remove barriers that create health disparities and to support residents with the tools needed to improve the infrastructure that makes physical activity and healthy food options possible. This Campaign leverages the value so many put on equitable access to healthy behaviors and as a result has been an effective method for achieving that goal.” A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/dfc9ddff-2387-40ae-bcdb-8ee2719a8ca3 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/24f496ea-5643-46b2-9c4c-1e54a2480339 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1878fe2c-a6b8-428f-ba41-b92cc2302de1


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Denver, Colorado, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- With tensions rising around health care access in the United States, it’s easy to get discouraged. Yet here in Colorado, there’s a growing movement for healthy change that is helping advance healthy eating and active living (HEAL) policies in communities across the state. Since 2013, LiveWell Colorado’s HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign has worked with municipalities to adopt and implement more than 100 policies and infrastructure investments that increase access to biking, walking, recreation, healthy food, and healthy workplaces—attributes that make communities healthier and more economically successful. Colorado is one of five states in the national HEAL Cities Campaign founded and funded by Kaiser Permanente. The Colorado Campaign is a partnership between the Colorado Municipal League and LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit working to increase access to healthy eating and active living by removing barriers that inequitably and disproportionately affect low-income communities and people of color. The Campaign provides free training, tools, and support to help municipal leaders adopt and implement policies in three key areas: active community, healthy food access, and healthy workplace. Since its launch four years ago, the HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign has spread to urban, suburban, and rural communities in every region of Colorado. With the addition of Sterling and Timnath earlier this month, LiveWell Colorado reached a major milestone—50 participating HEAL municipalities. This means the Campaign is now reaching more than half of our state's total population. “Cities all over the state are doing amazing work and it varies from place to place, as each municipality has its own unique attributes and challenges,” says Julie George, LiveWell Colorado’s HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign Director. “I love La Junta’s plan to install signage at the train stop, informing passengers about where and how close Main Street is. The signs will encourage them to take a short walk, patronize the local businesses, and enjoy a bit of La Junta during their stop. And in Cortez, they’ve changed zoning to allow vegetable gardens in their right of ways and then tied the care and upkeep of these gardens to their summer program for kids. The examples go on and on.” While the Campaign is made to be flexible in order to work with all municipalities, LiveWell has also placed a particular focus on reaching communities with high poverty levels, where residents are more likely to experience socioeconomic and environmental disadvantages that contribute to poor health. For example, with 19 percent of its residents living below the poverty level, Commerce City faces a number of challenges from homelessness to economic and food insecurity. “Focusing on health can be a real challenge, especially for those in our community who are struggling to make ends meet,” says City Manager Brian McBroom. Since joining the HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign in 2013, Commerce City has made great strides to improve quality of life for its residents. “The city has put many of the Campaign’s tenets to use by enacting policies that have resulted in new parks and recreational spaces, an enhanced network of local food pantries, and Complete Streets strategies,” says McBroom. In June 2016, Commerce City became the first municipality to reach Elite status—the highest of four levels in the Campaign. Elite cities are those that have adopted five or more HEAL policies. Arvada also joined the ranks of Elite cities in October 2016. “Through HEAL Cities & Towns, the city of Arvada has received critical guidance, particularly on ways to increase urban agriculture and healthy food access,” says City Manager Mark Deven. Arvada also secured one of seven HEAL Cities & Towns mini-grants in 2016, which provided funds for the city to conduct a healthy food assessment. “This valuable effort would not be possible without the Campaign’s support, and will go a long way toward helping us reach our goals for creating a healthy, vibrant community,” Deven says. Colorado Springs, the second-largest city in the state, recently achieved Fit status, the third of four levels in the Campaign. “Since becoming a HEAL city in 2014, Colorado Springs has moved several policies forward and embraced the importance of providing a healthy environment for our residents,” says President Pro Tempore Tem Jill Gaebler. “We formed a Food Policy Advisory Board and are working hard to increase access to healthy food, and have also furthered our active transportation goals by embracing the Complete Streets model.” “We are grateful to work with so many extraordinary partners around the state, including the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment as well as the Colorado Municipal League and their membership,” says LiveWell President and CEO, Gabriel Guillaume.  “Our overall aim is to remove barriers that create health disparities and to support residents with the tools needed to improve the infrastructure that makes physical activity and healthy food options possible. This Campaign leverages the value so many put on equitable access to healthy behaviors and as a result has been an effective method for achieving that goal.” A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/dfc9ddff-2387-40ae-bcdb-8ee2719a8ca3 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/24f496ea-5643-46b2-9c4c-1e54a2480339 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1878fe2c-a6b8-428f-ba41-b92cc2302de1


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

Denver, Colorado, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- With tensions rising around health care access in the United States, it’s easy to get discouraged. Yet here in Colorado, there’s a growing movement for healthy change that is helping advance healthy eating and active living (HEAL) policies in communities across the state. Since 2013, LiveWell Colorado’s HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign has worked with municipalities to adopt and implement more than 100 policies and infrastructure investments that increase access to biking, walking, recreation, healthy food, and healthy workplaces—attributes that make communities healthier and more economically successful. Colorado is one of five states in the national HEAL Cities Campaign founded and funded by Kaiser Permanente. The Colorado Campaign is a partnership between the Colorado Municipal League and LiveWell Colorado, a nonprofit working to increase access to healthy eating and active living by removing barriers that inequitably and disproportionately affect low-income communities and people of color. The Campaign provides free training, tools, and support to help municipal leaders adopt and implement policies in three key areas: active community, healthy food access, and healthy workplace. Since its launch four years ago, the HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign has spread to urban, suburban, and rural communities in every region of Colorado. With the addition of Sterling and Timnath earlier this month, LiveWell Colorado reached a major milestone—50 participating HEAL municipalities. This means the Campaign is now reaching more than half of our state's total population. “Cities all over the state are doing amazing work and it varies from place to place, as each municipality has its own unique attributes and challenges,” says Julie George, LiveWell Colorado’s HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign Director. “I love La Junta’s plan to install signage at the train stop, informing passengers about where and how close Main Street is. The signs will encourage them to take a short walk, patronize the local businesses, and enjoy a bit of La Junta during their stop. And in Cortez, they’ve changed zoning to allow vegetable gardens in their right of ways and then tied the care and upkeep of these gardens to their summer program for kids. The examples go on and on.” While the Campaign is made to be flexible in order to work with all municipalities, LiveWell has also placed a particular focus on reaching communities with high poverty levels, where residents are more likely to experience socioeconomic and environmental disadvantages that contribute to poor health. For example, with 19 percent of its residents living below the poverty level, Commerce City faces a number of challenges from homelessness to economic and food insecurity. “Focusing on health can be a real challenge, especially for those in our community who are struggling to make ends meet,” says City Manager Brian McBroom. Since joining the HEAL Cities & Towns Campaign in 2013, Commerce City has made great strides to improve quality of life for its residents. “The city has put many of the Campaign’s tenets to use by enacting policies that have resulted in new parks and recreational spaces, an enhanced network of local food pantries, and Complete Streets strategies,” says McBroom. In June 2016, Commerce City became the first municipality to reach Elite status—the highest of four levels in the Campaign. Elite cities are those that have adopted five or more HEAL policies. Arvada also joined the ranks of Elite cities in October 2016. “Through HEAL Cities & Towns, the city of Arvada has received critical guidance, particularly on ways to increase urban agriculture and healthy food access,” says City Manager Mark Deven. Arvada also secured one of seven HEAL Cities & Towns mini-grants in 2016, which provided funds for the city to conduct a healthy food assessment. “This valuable effort would not be possible without the Campaign’s support, and will go a long way toward helping us reach our goals for creating a healthy, vibrant community,” Deven says. Colorado Springs, the second-largest city in the state, recently achieved Fit status, the third of four levels in the Campaign. “Since becoming a HEAL city in 2014, Colorado Springs has moved several policies forward and embraced the importance of providing a healthy environment for our residents,” says President Pro Tempore Tem Jill Gaebler. “We formed a Food Policy Advisory Board and are working hard to increase access to healthy food, and have also furthered our active transportation goals by embracing the Complete Streets model.” “We are grateful to work with so many extraordinary partners around the state, including the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment as well as the Colorado Municipal League and their membership,” says LiveWell President and CEO, Gabriel Guillaume.  “Our overall aim is to remove barriers that create health disparities and to support residents with the tools needed to improve the infrastructure that makes physical activity and healthy food options possible. This Campaign leverages the value so many put on equitable access to healthy behaviors and as a result has been an effective method for achieving that goal.” A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/dfc9ddff-2387-40ae-bcdb-8ee2719a8ca3 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/24f496ea-5643-46b2-9c4c-1e54a2480339 A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/1878fe2c-a6b8-428f-ba41-b92cc2302de1


Devos D.,University of Lille Nord de France | Moreau C.,University of Lille Nord de France | Devedjian J.C.,University of Lille Nord de France | Kluza J.,University of Lille Nord de France | And 26 more authors.
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling | Year: 2014

Aims: The pathophysiological role of iron in Parkinson's disease (PD) was assessed by a chelation strategy aimed at reducing oxidative damage associated with regional iron deposition without affecting circulating metals. Translational cell and animal models provided concept proofs and a delayed-start (DS) treatment paradigm, the basis for preliminary clinical assessments. Results: For translational studies, we assessed the effect of oxidative insults in mice systemically prechelated with deferiprone (DFP) by following motor functions, striatal dopamine (HPLC and MRI-PET), and brain iron deposition (relaxation-R2*-MRI) aided by spectroscopic measurements of neuronal labile iron (with fluorescence-sensitive iron sensors) and oxidative damage by markers of protein, lipid, and DNA modification. DFP significantly reduced labile iron and biological damage in oxidation-stressed cells and animals, improving motor functions while raising striatal dopamine. For a pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial, early-stage Parkinson's patients on stabilized dopamine regimens enrolled in a 12-month single-center study with DFP (30mg/kg/day). Based on a 6-month DS paradigm, early-start patients (n=19) compared to DS patients (n=18) (37/40 completed) responded significantly earlier and sustainably to treatment in both substantia nigra iron deposits (R2* MRI) and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor indicators of disease progression (p<0.03 and p<0.04, respectively). Apart from three rapidly resolved neutropenia cases, safety was maintained throughout the trial. Innovation: A moderate iron chelation regimen that avoids changes in systemic iron levels may constitute a novel therapeutic modality for PD. Conclusions: The therapeutic features of a chelation modality established in translational models and in pilot clinical trials warrant comprehensive evaluation of symptomatic and/or disease-modifying potential of chelation in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 195-210. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2014.

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