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Kolkata, India

Mukherjee D.C.,Heritage Institute of Technology | Chowdhury S.B.,Envirocheck | Paul A.,Envirocheck | Rakshit B.,Envirocheck | Das P.,Envirocheck
Journal of the Indian Chemical Society | Year: 2012

Industrial progress has been accompanied by a growing negative impact on the environment in terms of its pollution and degradation. In our country number of coke oven batteries for production of low ash metallurgical coke is increasing day by day. During off gas cleaning there are different sources of generation of waste water. But the waste water is not treated before discharge. Naturally found coal is converted into coke in coke ovens and a large quantity of water is used for quenching hot coke and for washing gas. Effluent generated contains high value of TSS, BOD, COD, phenols, ammonia, cyanide, which cause serious water pollution problems. This study was carried out to focus on characteristics of the effluent produced by coke oven plant and a treatability study was conducted to find out an appropriate treatment procedure to achieve a depletion of pollutants for discharge to surface water bodies after meeting the level of standard. This study was done initially separating ammonia of raw effluent through natural zeolite for ammonia scrubbing water. After this treatment the treated water was mixed with coal tar separator effluent, quenching effluent and gas plant effluent for chemical treatment followed by two stages aerobic biodegradation process and finally adsorption process by activated carbon. Overall depletion rate of COD, BOD, phenol, cyanide, in the waste water achieved by this treatment process were 94.9%, 96.2%, 98.3%, 94.52%, respectively and discharge effluent met the Pollution Control Board standard. On the basis of the findings schematic treatment system was finalized. Source


Mukherjee D.C.,Heritage Institute of Technology | Chowdhury S.B.,Envirocheck | Paul A.,Envirocheck | Rakshit B.,Envirocheck | Das P.,Envirocheck
Journal of the Indian Chemical Society | Year: 2012

Treatment of pharmaceutical waste water by chemical process following biological and tertiary processes was studied. The system was optimized and depletion of COD and BOD was achieved by two stage activated sludge process. The feeding of chemically treated waste water in first stage aerobic reactor on 24 hourly basis proved to be effective in achieving the target of depletion of initial pollutants load to its maximum depletion level. The MLSS level of 4000-4500 mg/L in aerobic reactor was found to be more effective in respect to the overall performance of this treatment process. The overall removal rate of COD and BOD in the waste water achieved by this treatment process was up to 99.3%, and the effluent COD and BOD met the Pollution Control Board standard. Source


Mukherjee D.C.,Heritage Institute of Technology | Chowdhury S.B.,Envirocheck | Paul A.,Envirocheck | Das P.,Envirocheck
Journal of the Indian Chemical Society | Year: 2012

Due to industrialization a number of different industries have become interested to invest in our country. Some of the industries are discharging their waste water without treatment to the water bodies causing ecological imbalance in aquatic life as a whole. In this study water samples were collected from two industries, manufacturing leather chemicals and kraft paper. A laboratory scale treatability study was conducted to and out an appropriate treatment procedure to achieve a depletion of pollutants - BOD and COD to a level to meet the standard for discharge to surface water bodies. The treatment procedure was standardized and a physicochemical treatment followed by biological treatment and tertiary treatment was found to be more suitable. The dosing rate of chemicals and retention period of biological degradation were fixed. On the basis of the findings the design criteria of individual units of effluent treatment plant was finalized. Source


Mukherjee D.C.,Heritage Institute of Technology | Chowdhury S.B.,Envirocheck | Paul A.,Envirocheck | Das P.,Envirocheck
Journal of the Indian Chemical Society | Year: 2012

Arsenic contamination of ground water has been reported from many parts of West Bengal and Bihar since last few years. This review is compiled to summarize reasons and effects of contamination of arsenic in ground water and technologies currently being investigated to remove arsenic from ground water so that it can be acceptable for our use. The review comprises different theories and hypotheses that have been put forward from time to time for providing explanation for arsenic contamination. In some arsenic affected areas of West Bengal and Bihar, substitution of drinking water source by safe and easily available alternatives may not always be possible for implementation during part or whole of the year, or even if it is possible, may be very expensive. This paper will describe some safe water technologies for arsenic removal. Arsenic removal technologies are based on oxidation including solar oxidation, coagulation/co-precipitation, sedimentation, filtration, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane/reverse osmosis and biological process. The conventional technologies will be discussed to meet the requirements of households and communities which will be suitable for rural environment. Most commonly used arsenic removal units include fill and draw units, BCSIR Filter Unit, bucket treatment unit, activated alumina unit, use of iron coated sand, unit developed by Stevens Institute Technology and arsenic removal unit attached to tube-well. Some technologies utilize indigenous materials for arsenic removal. The paper will describe a short review of cause, effect of arsenic contamination and the technologies that may be used for arsenic removal in our country. Source

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