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Entergy Corp. is an integrated energy company engaged primarily in electric power production and retail distribution operations in the Deep South of the United States. It is headquartered in the Central Business District of New Orleans, Louisiana. Wikipedia.


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Local leaders joined executives from NextEra Energy Resources and Entergy Arkansas this morning to break ground on Arkansas' largest universal solar energy project - the Stuttgart Solar Energy Center. "We are pleased to work with our partners at Entergy to bring low-cost, renewable energy to their customers and introduce the first universal solar project of this scale in Arkansas," said Armando Pimentel, president and CEO of NextEra Energy Resources. Start the conversation, or Read more at Electric Energy Online.


News Article | May 14, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Claiborne County,  Mississippi is home to the Grand Gulf Nuclear Generating Station operated by Entergy.  Having one of those things in the neighborhood is a little nerve wracking.  The Nuclear Regulatory Agency defines a plume exposure pathway zone and a larger ingestion pathway zone in the vicinity of the plant, in the event something goes really wrong. On the upside, a power plant could mean a lot of tax revenue and Claiborne County shows up on lists as one of the poorest counties in the country. Only under Mississippi law a county doesn't  get to tax a nuclear power plant.  The state taxes the plant and divvies up the money among counties in the plant's service area.  Some residents claim that the reason for that law is that Claiborne County, home to Mississippi's only nuclear power plant, has a population that is over 80% African American.  That was what the lawsuit Doss v Claiborne County Board of Supervisors was all about.  Spoiler alert - it did not go well for the disgruntled residents. As is common in these sort of cases, they foundered on the rock of standing. Claiborne County has significance in the history of the civil rights movement.  In 1966, African American citizens of Port Gibson, the county seat, started a boycott of white merchants which was suspended after the City hired its first black police officer.  Police shooting in the wake of the Martin Luther King assassination rebooted the boycott with leadership from the NAACP and Charles Evers, brother of Medgar Evers, who had been murdered in 1963.  NAACP liability for collateral violence associated with the boycott ended up at the United States Supreme Court, which overturned a Mississippi judgment of $1.2 million against NAACP in 1982. And property taxes were a big part of the racial struggle in Claiborne County. Evan Doss Jr. became the first black county tax assessor in 1972.  Historian Emilye Crosby in The Black Struggle In Claiborne County, Mississippi wrote: During his campaign, Doss promised to establish a "fair and equal tax for all county residents," and when he took office, the organizers initiated and effort to reassess and equalize the community's property tax system.  In keeping with their pattern, whites reacted with fierce opposition. The outgoing tax assessor specifically warned Doss not to alter the existing assessments, and the board of supervisors drastically cut Doss's operating budget to roughly half that of comparable counties.  ........................ Doss and his associates determined that blacks were being inequitably taxed and estimated that the overall assessment was bout two-thirds of the correct value. In the nineties there were issues about how Doss handled his tax collection duties serious enough to land him in federal prison. Doss does not seem real popular with The Vicksburg Post. At any rate in 2009 Evan Doss Jr went on record supporting the lawsuit. Reminds you of that Faulkner line - " The past is never dead,  It's not even the past. " Not The First Rodeo The law that stripped Claiborne County of its ability to tax the Grand Gulf nuclear power plant was challenged in the eighties and went up to the Mississippi Supreme Court.  Ironically, the Claiborne County Board of Supervisors was one of the plaintiffs in that case.  The law had required a constitutional amendment, which seems to have consumed most of the Mississippi Supreme Court's attention in Burrell v Mississippi State Tax Commission.  They did not get into the racial issues, but left an intriguing opening. Almost thirty years later and someday has not yet arrived.  The Burrell plaintiffs allowed their federal claim to be dismissed with prejudice in exchange for a $2 million payment to the county.


The Stuttgart Solar Energy Center will span 475 acres, approximately seven miles southeast of Stuttgart, AR. Construction will last approximately nine months. Once complete, the facility will feature more than 350,000 photovoltaic solar panels that convert the sun's energy into electricity. The solar energy center will have a capacity to generate 81 megawatts of electricity, or enough to power more than 13,000 homes. An affiliate of NextEra Energy Resources is developing the project and will build, own and operate it. The energy will serve Entergy Arkansas customers under a 20-year power purchase agreement. "This project allows Entergy Arkansas to diversify our power generation in the state and provide our customers with access to emissions-free, renewable energy at a good price," said Rick Riley, president and CEO of Entergy Arkansas. "In NextEra Energy Resources we have an experienced partner to build and operate a project that will deliver tremendous value to our customers." The project will create a significant economic boost for Arkansas County, creating up to 250 jobs during the construction phase. From labor and materials, to housing, health care and construction - a wide variety of local businesses will benefit from the influx of economic activity. "This project will provide good jobs, and Arkansas County businesses will benefit from the extra activity, too," said Bethany Hildebrand, executive director and CEO of the Stuttgart Chamber of Commerce. "We are thrilled to host the state's largest solar facility and help realize the benefits it can bring to our community." Over its operational life, the Stuttgart Solar Energy Center is expected to generate nearly $8 million in additional revenue for Arkansas County, with much of that funding going to help Arkansas County Public Schools. "I know our county and school district will look at all of the opportunities these funds will provide," said Arkansas County Judge Eddie Best. "The funds will be a big boost to many of the school district and county's future projects and we couldn't be happier to welcome this facility to our community." NextEra Energy Resources, LLC (together with its affiliated entities, "NextEra Energy Resources"), is a clean energy leader and is one of the largest wholesale generators of electric power in the U.S., with approximately 19,990 megawatts of generating capacity, which includes megawatts associated with noncontrolling interests related to NextEra Energy Partners, LP (NYSE: NEP), primarily in 29 states and Canada as of year-end 2016. NextEra Energy Resources, together with its affiliated entities, is the world's largest generator of renewable energy from the wind and sun. The business operates clean, emissions-free nuclear power generation facilities in New Hampshire, Iowa and Wisconsin as part of the NextEra Energy nuclear fleet, which is one of the largest in the United States. NextEra Energy Resources, LLC is a subsidiary of Juno Beach, Florida-based NextEra Energy, Inc. (NYSE: NEE). For more information, visit www.NextEraEnergyResources.com. Entergy Arkansas provides electricity to approximately 700,000 customers in 63 counties. Entergy Arkansas is a subsidiary of Entergy Corporation (NYSE: ETR), an integrated energy company engaged primarily in electric power production and retail distribution operations. Entergy owns and operates power plants with approximately 30,000 megawatts of electric generating capacity, including nearly 10,000 megawatts of nuclear power. Entergy delivers electricity to 2.8 million utility customers in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. Entergy has annual revenues of approximately $11.5 billion and more than 13,000 employees. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/entergy-nextera-energy-resources-break-ground-on-arkansas-largest-universal-solar-energy-project-300454234.html


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Rod's knowledge, leadership, diverse utility experience and relentless focus on creating value for our stakeholders make him the right person for this role at a time when Entergy is becoming a pure-play utility," said Leo Denault, chairman and CEO. "As we embark on the utility's $10.4 billion customer-centric capital plan, Rod will ensure we execute prudently, effectively and in the best interest of our stakeholders." West has served as a member of Entergy's Office of the Chief Executive since 2010, when he was named executive vice president and chief administrative officer. In that role, Rod helped create the company's shared services organization, which includes information technology, finance operations, human resources operations, supply chain and administrative services. In his CAO role, West also provided executive oversight of Entergy's federal policy, regulatory and governmental affairs, and corporate communications functions. West has a long history on the utility side of the business, having served as president and CEO of Entergy New Orleans, Inc. from 2007 to 2010, where he led that company out of its post-Hurricane Katrina bankruptcy and back to profitability. In the post-Katrina period, he is credited with leading the reconstruction of the company's electric distribution system and the ongoing effort to replace nearly 850 miles of underground pipe damaged during the storm, an effort recognized as the 2009 Global Infrastructure Project of the Year by Platts Global Energy Awards. "As we welcome Rod to his new role, we also we also want to say thank you to Theo for his many contributions to Entergy in his 34 years of service," said Denault. "He has helped position the utility for a successful future, and we are very grateful to Theo for his outstanding service to Entergy." West has a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame, a Juris Doctor from the Tulane University School of Law and a MBA from Tulane University. Entergy Corporation is an integrated energy company engaged primarily in electric power production and retail distribution operations. Entergy owns and operates power plants with approximately 30,000 megawatts of electric generating capacity, including nearly 9,000 megawatts of nuclear power. Entergy delivers electricity to 2.9 million utility customers in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. Entergy has annual revenues of approximately $10.8 billion and nearly 13,000 employees. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/entergy-names-rod-west-as-utility-group-president-300457429.html


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

Nuclear power currently accounts for about 20% of electricity generation in the United States, playing an important role in electricity markets. EIA’s 2017 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO2017) Reference case assumes that about 25% of the nuclear capacity now operating that does not have announced retirement plans will be removed from service by 2050. Nearly all nuclear plants now in use began operation between 1970 and 1990. These plants would require a subsequent license renewal before 2050 to operate beyond the 60-year period covered by their original 40-year operating license and the 20-year license extension that nearly 90% of plants currently operating have either already received or have applied for. The AEO2017 Reference case projections do not envision a large amount of new nuclear capacity additions. By 2050, only four reactors currently under construction and some uprates at existing plants are projected to come online. Except during maintenance or refueling cycles, nuclear plants operate around the clock as baseload generators, meaning nuclear plants make up a disproportionately large share of generation compared with their share of electricity generating capacity. Generating capacity using other fuels is typically dispatched at much lower rates than nuclear units. As more nuclear capacity is retired than built, and as other fuels such as natural gas and renewables gain market share, the nuclear share of the U.S. electricity generation mix declines from 20% in 2016 to 11% in 2050 in EIA’s Reference case projections. From 2018 through 2050, 9.1 gigawatts (GW) of nuclear capacity is added in the AEO2017 Reference case, which assumes that current laws and policies do not change. Two projects under construction—V.C. Summer in South Carolina and Vogtle in Georgia—each have two reactors and are expected to add 4.4 GW of new nuclear capacity, although their progress has been uncertain since the company manufacturing their reactors, Westinghouse Electric, recently filed for bankruptcy. Another 4.7 GW of added nuclear capacity results from uprates, or operational changes that allow existing plants to produce more electricity. Increases from uprates are expected to end by 2040, as EIA expects that all plants planning to uprate will have completed the projects by 2040. More than offsetting the total addition of 9.1 GW of nuclear capacity from new plants and uprates in the AEO2017 Reference case are projected retirements of 29.9 GW of nuclear capacity from 2018 through 2050. Many of EIA’s anticipated near-term retirements include those that have been announced by plant operators. When the AEO2017 assumptions were finalized in late 2016, nuclear plant operators had announced intentions to retire five facilities between 2017 and 2026: Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 in 2017, Clinton Unit 1 in 2018, Pilgrim Unit 1 in 2019, Oyster Creek Unit 1 in 2020, and Diablo Canyon Units 1 and 2 in 2025 and 2026. Since AEO2017 assumptions were finalized, legislation passed by the Illinois government created financial incentives through 2026 to support the continued operation of Quad Cities and Clinton. Operators of these two plants subsequently withdrew their announcements to retire those plants, reducing the amount of capacity likely to retire in 2017 and 2018. However, in the months since AEO2017 assumptions were finalized, Entergy also announced its intention to retire three plants: Michigan’s Palisades in 2018 and New York’s Indian Point Units 2 and 3 around 2020. New commercial nuclear power plants are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for 40 years. Because many nuclear plants were built more than 40 years ago, nearly 90% of currently operating nuclear plants are currently operating under or have applied for 20-year license renewals. Plant operators may apply for subsequent license renewals to continue operating for an additional 20 years (a total of 80 years). The capital investment needed to extend the life of nuclear plants beyond 60 years is currently unknown and could vary significantly across the nuclear power fleet. Other areas of uncertainty include plant operators’ interest in obtaining subsequent license renewals and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s willingness to grant those license renewals for plants to operate beyond 60 years. Furthermore, policy or technology cost developments that might advantage or disadvantage existing nuclear plants relative to other generation technologies and the cost of natural gas are likely to play an important role in future retirement decisions.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

The Trump administration’s obsession with the coal industry has driven many of its early energy and environmental policy initiatives—with the Energy Department’s thinly veiled baseload power plant review just the latest in a string of efforts to buttress the troubled sector. But none of these policies are going to change coal’s central problem: The utility industry, far and away its largest customer, is steadily moving away from the black rock. This transition won’t happen overnight, but the direction is clear, as a close review of recent utility executive statements and company publications clearly demonstrates. Consider the message delivered by Allen Leverett, president and CEO of Milwaukee-based WEC Energy Group, in the company’s latest annual report: “I also believe that some form of carbon emission regulation is ultimately inevitable. As the regulation of carbon emissions takes shape, our plan is to work with our industry partners, environmental groups and the state of Wisconsin to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 40 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. “In 2016, about half of the electricity we delivered to our customers was derived from low- or no-carbon sources such as natural gas, nuclear fuel, wind farms and hydroelectric facilities. However, we want to continue to make progress in this area. Relatively flat electricity demand growth, coupled with natural gas and coal economics, has driven us to re-evaluate our generation portfolio. Taken as a group, I want any changes that we make to reduce costs, preserve fuel diversity and keep us on a path to reducing our carbon emissions.” In other words, there will be no new coal generation in the WEC fleet, and the company’s reliance on the fuel, currently around 50 percent of its needs, is going to drop. In particular, the company has plans to build new natural gas-fired generation in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and close its five-unit, 359 megawatt Presque Isle facility there, which now burns roughly 1.2 million tons of coal annually according to the company, whose two electric utility subsidiaries serve more than 1.5 million customers in Wisconsin and the UP of Michigan. Or consider the comments made by Lynn Good, chairman, president and CEO of Duke Energy, during the Charlotte, N.C.-based company’s annual meeting earlier this month: To get to that point, the company, one of the nation’s largest electric utilities serving roughly 7.4 million electric customers across six states and controlling approximately 52,000 MW of generating capacity, plans to boost natural gas-fired generation to 35 percent of its generation portfolio during the next 10 years and raise renewable output to about 10 percent, Good told the meeting. Earlier, in releasing the company’s 2016 sustainability report, Good discussed another point that is driving many utility leaders (but that has been totally absent from any Trump administration talk)—customer expectations. “As technology and customers’ expectations evolve, Duke Energy is responding by investing in innovative new solutions to power the lives of our customers with reliable, affordable and increasingly clean energy,” Good said. “How we generate energy is more important than ever before and we’re making long-term investments that will deliver a lower-carbon future.” And then there is this nugget offered up by Nicholas Akins, chairman, president and CEO of American Electric Power, at the company’s annual meeting in late April: The chart below from the Columbus, Ohio-based company’s April investor meeting makes Akins’ point crystal clear—coal is certainly still a part of the mix, but the growth at AEP, which serves some 5.4 million electric customers across 11 states, will be in natural gas and renewables, just like at every other utility in the country. Looking to the South, the picture is the same. In its just-released 2016 sustainability report, New Orleans-based Entergy points out that the amount of coal on its system, small by comparison to AEP and other Midwest utilities, has dropped from 11 percent to 7 percent in just two years, while the amount of lower-emitting natural gas-fired generation has jumped from 28 percent to 41 percent of its system needs. In addition, while not yet a major part of its generation, renewables are gaining ground. “Technology advances are making renewable energy as well as certain distributed energy resources increasingly cost-competitive,” the company, which has 2.9 million electric customers in four states, wrote in its report (which is available here either for online reading or as a downloadable pdf). “Entergy is exploring utility-scale renewable opportunities as well as potential applications for distributed energy resources as part of our ongoing modernization efforts.” Asked directly about the administration’s coal rescue efforts, Entergy CEO Leo Denault told Arkansas Online’s David Smith that they didn’t matter. “Our desire is to be an environmentally responsible company,” Denault said. “Whatever the administration does, that doesn’t change our point of view.” Head west and you hear exactly the same refrain. In its draft 2017 integrated resources plan, submitted in late April, Albuquerque-based PNM Resources outlined a future that would close its remaining coal-fired generating units by 2031. Echoing the customer-centered comments made by Duke’s Good, Pat Vincent-Collawn, chairman, president and CEO of PNM Resources, said: Under the terms of the plan, PNM, which serves roughly 510,000 customers throughout New Mexico, would close Units 1 and 4 of the coal-fired San Juan generating station by the end of 2022, instead of 2036 as in the utility’s previous IRP. The four-unit station has a total generating capacity of 1,684 MW; PNM owns 783 MW of the total and operates all four units. Units 2 and 3 have a capacity of 837 MW of which PNM owns 418 MW; they are being closed at the end of this year to comply with regional haze requirements under the Clean Air Act. A bulwark of the utility’s generation fleet since it was completed in the 1970s, San Juan is no longer economically competitive the company’s draft IRP concludes: “The most significant finding of the IRP is that retiring PNM’s…share of SJGS [San Juan Generating Station] in 2022 would provide long-term cost savings for PNM’s customers…. The results of the IRP illustrate that energy needs are changing and replacing coal supply with renewable energy and more flexible generators will save money in the long run.” The draft IRP (which is available here) also indicates that it would be economic for the utility to “exit” its 13 percent stake in the 1,540 MW Four Corners coal-fired plant when its existing coal supply agreement expires in 2031; PNM’s previous IRP included a post-2036 date for closing/exiting from this facility. “This action would eliminate coal from PNM’s generating fleet,” PNM wrote. And much like its larger neighbors to the east, regardless of the Trump triumph, PNM is planning for the eventual imposition of carbon controls. “The near-term outlook for explicit carbon costs has been altered by the 2016 presidential election,” the utility noted in the draft IRP. “Implementation of the Clean Power Plan is on hold for judicial review and the key provisions are being unwound by the EPA under a new executive order. Nonetheless, PNM is continuing to model a cost for each ton of CO emitted in each portfolio’s projected operation. PNM expects that a replacement for the CPP is likely to be implemented at some point in response to continued international calls that carbon emissions should be addressed.” Finally, even in deep-red Idaho to the north, Boise-based Idaho Power is steadily trimming its reliance on coal-fired electric generation. Just two years ago, coal accounted for 35.7 percent of its generation mix, today it is less than 25 percent—and about to fall even further. Earlier this month the utility, which serves approximately 535,000 customers in Idaho and parts of eastern Oregon, filed a settlement agreement with the Idaho Public Utilities Commission under which it would seek to close the 522 MW, two-unit North Valmy coal-fired generating station by 2025. Under the terms of Idaho Power’s proposal Unit 1, totaling 254 MW, would be shut in 2019 while Unit 2, totaling 268 MW, would be closed no later than 2025; earlier the utility had planned to run the units to 2031 and 2035, respectively. Idaho Power co-owns the facility with Nevada Energy and now must reach an agreement with its utility neighbor, but since NV Energy had previously said it hoped to close the units by 2025 as well the two companies should be able to hammer out a plan for shuttering the coal plant by that date. The specifics may remain up in the air at the moment, but the end result is clear—the plant is going to close, likely sooner than later. No matter where you look, the picture is the same: Electric utilities are taking a close look at coal and finding that it no longer makes economic sense. The Trump administration may not be willing (or able) to admit this, but it is obvious to everyone else—particularly those making the investments decisions in the electric utility industry In a post 18 months ago about nuclear power (read it here), I wrote that believing in the economics of large nuclear requires utilities to believe in impossible things; the same can be said today of the Trump administration and its promise to restore coal’s lost luster.


LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / May 25, 2017 / Active Wall St. blog coverage looks at the headline from Charlotte, North Carolina based Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: BW) ("B&W") as the Company announced on May 23, 2017 that its Industrial Steam Generation group will transition from the Power segment to the Industrial segment. The transition will be w.e.f. July 01, 2017. The Company also announced the appointment of Leslie Kass, who will take over as Senior Vice President, Industrial. The appointment is effective immediately. Register with us now for your free membership and blog access at: One of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' competitors within the Industrial Electrical Equipment space, EnerSys (NYSE: ENS), announced on May 04, 2017, its preliminary financial results for Q4 FY17 and full year FY17 which ended on March 31, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on EnerSys in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its blog coverage on BW; touching on ENS. Get all of our free blog coverage and more by clicking on the link below: B&W is a global leader in energy and environmental technologies and services for power and industrial markets. The Company was established by Stephen Wilcox and George Babcock in 1857 as Babcock, Wilcox & Company to manufacture and market the water tube boiler patented by Stephen Wilcox. The Company completes 150 years in FY17, and it has operations, subsidiaries and joint ventures across the globe. The Company employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. Changes in the Industrial Segment From July 01, 2017, the Industrial segment will include B&W MEGTEC subsidiary based in DePere, Wisconsin, B&W SPIG subsidiary based in Arona, Italy, B&W Universal subsidiary based in Stoughton, Wisconsin, Industrial Steam Generation group, which will continue to be based in Barberton, Ohio. The Industrial segment provides a wide range of custom-engineered technologies for cooling, environmental, noise abatement, and industrial steam generation applications, as well as related aftermarket services. The Industrial Steam Generation group, which has now been added to the Industrial segment, recorded revenue of more than $100 million in FY16. After the addition of the Industrial Steam Generation group, the Industrial segment will be B&W's second-largest business unit with approximately $550 million in annual revenues. Commenting on the organizations restructuring, E. James Ferland, Chairman and CEO of B&W said: "Our Industrial segment is a key part of our Company and a strong driver for growth as we continue to expand our non-coal revenue base. Integrating our Industrial Steam Generation group into our Industrial segment will also increase efficiency in our business development efforts and promote more effective cross-selling of related products and services in the industries we serve." About Leslie Kass and her role Before the announcement of Leslie's appointment as Senior Vice President of Industrial, she was the Vice President of Retrofits and Continuous Emissions Monitoring for B&W's Power segment. She was responsible for Company's global retrofits business and worked closely with customers to develop solutions for their steam generation and environmental needs. She also held the positions as Vice President, Investor Relations & Communications, and as Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at B&W in the past. Before joining B&W, Leslie held a number of significant engineering and project management-related positions with Westinghouse, Entergy, and Duke Energy. As the Senior Vice President of B&W's Industrial segment, Leslie will provide strong vision, focus, and direction to the business unit. She will help in accelerating the growth of this segment and diversify B&W's overall revenue stream. Simultaneously, she will be responsible for providing outstanding service to existing customers of the Industrial segment. At the closing bell, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' stock climbed 2.49%, ending the trading session at $11.10. A total volume of 698.27 thousand shares were traded at the end of the day. In the last month, shares of the Company have surged 14.55%. The stock currently has a market cap of $541.01 million. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst, for further information on analyst credentials, please email [email protected]. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. 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LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / May 25, 2017 / Active Wall St. blog coverage looks at the headline from Charlotte, North Carolina based Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: BW) ("B&W") as the Company announced on May 23, 2017 that its Industrial Steam Generation group will transition from the Power segment to the Industrial segment. The transition will be w.e.f. July 01, 2017. The Company also announced the appointment of Leslie Kass, who will take over as Senior Vice President, Industrial. The appointment is effective immediately. Register with us now for your free membership and blog access at: One of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' competitors within the Industrial Electrical Equipment space, EnerSys (NYSE: ENS), announced on May 04, 2017, its preliminary financial results for Q4 FY17 and full year FY17 which ended on March 31, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on EnerSys in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its blog coverage on BW; touching on ENS. Get all of our free blog coverage and more by clicking on the link below: B&W is a global leader in energy and environmental technologies and services for power and industrial markets. The Company was established by Stephen Wilcox and George Babcock in 1857 as Babcock, Wilcox & Company to manufacture and market the water tube boiler patented by Stephen Wilcox. The Company completes 150 years in FY17, and it has operations, subsidiaries and joint ventures across the globe. The Company employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. Changes in the Industrial Segment From July 01, 2017, the Industrial segment will include B&W MEGTEC subsidiary based in DePere, Wisconsin, B&W SPIG subsidiary based in Arona, Italy, B&W Universal subsidiary based in Stoughton, Wisconsin, Industrial Steam Generation group, which will continue to be based in Barberton, Ohio. The Industrial segment provides a wide range of custom-engineered technologies for cooling, environmental, noise abatement, and industrial steam generation applications, as well as related aftermarket services. The Industrial Steam Generation group, which has now been added to the Industrial segment, recorded revenue of more than $100 million in FY16. After the addition of the Industrial Steam Generation group, the Industrial segment will be B&W's second-largest business unit with approximately $550 million in annual revenues. Commenting on the organizations restructuring, E. James Ferland, Chairman and CEO of B&W said: "Our Industrial segment is a key part of our Company and a strong driver for growth as we continue to expand our non-coal revenue base. Integrating our Industrial Steam Generation group into our Industrial segment will also increase efficiency in our business development efforts and promote more effective cross-selling of related products and services in the industries we serve." About Leslie Kass and her role Before the announcement of Leslie's appointment as Senior Vice President of Industrial, she was the Vice President of Retrofits and Continuous Emissions Monitoring for B&W's Power segment. She was responsible for Company's global retrofits business and worked closely with customers to develop solutions for their steam generation and environmental needs. She also held the positions as Vice President, Investor Relations & Communications, and as Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at B&W in the past. Before joining B&W, Leslie held a number of significant engineering and project management-related positions with Westinghouse, Entergy, and Duke Energy. As the Senior Vice President of B&W's Industrial segment, Leslie will provide strong vision, focus, and direction to the business unit. She will help in accelerating the growth of this segment and diversify B&W's overall revenue stream. Simultaneously, she will be responsible for providing outstanding service to existing customers of the Industrial segment. At the closing bell, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' stock climbed 2.49%, ending the trading session at $11.10. A total volume of 698.27 thousand shares were traded at the end of the day. In the last month, shares of the Company have surged 14.55%. The stock currently has a market cap of $541.01 million. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst, for further information on analyst credentials, please email info@activewallst.com. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. 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Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institut LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / May 25, 2017 / Active Wall St. blog coverage looks at the headline from Charlotte, North Carolina based Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: BW) ("B&W") as the Company announced on May 23, 2017 that its Industrial Steam Generation group will transition from the Power segment to the Industrial segment. The transition will be w.e.f. July 01, 2017. The Company also announced the appointment of Leslie Kass, who will take over as Senior Vice President, Industrial. The appointment is effective immediately. Register with us now for your free membership and blog access at: One of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' competitors within the Industrial Electrical Equipment space, EnerSys (NYSE: ENS), announced on May 04, 2017, its preliminary financial results for Q4 FY17 and full year FY17 which ended on March 31, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on EnerSys in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its blog coverage on BW; touching on ENS. Get all of our free blog coverage and more by clicking on the link below: B&W is a global leader in energy and environmental technologies and services for power and industrial markets. The Company was established by Stephen Wilcox and George Babcock in 1857 as Babcock, Wilcox & Company to manufacture and market the water tube boiler patented by Stephen Wilcox. The Company completes 150 years in FY17, and it has operations, subsidiaries and joint ventures across the globe. The Company employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. Changes in the Industrial Segment From July 01, 2017, the Industrial segment will include B&W MEGTEC subsidiary based in DePere, Wisconsin, B&W SPIG subsidiary based in Arona, Italy, B&W Universal subsidiary based in Stoughton, Wisconsin, Industrial Steam Generation group, which will continue to be based in Barberton, Ohio. The Industrial segment provides a wide range of custom-engineered technologies for cooling, environmental, noise abatement, and industrial steam generation applications, as well as related aftermarket services. The Industrial Steam Generation group, which has now been added to the Industrial segment, recorded revenue of more than $100 million in FY16. After the addition of the Industrial Steam Generation group, the Industrial segment will be B&W's second-largest business unit with approximately $550 million in annual revenues. Commenting on the organizations restructuring, E. James Ferland, Chairman and CEO of B&W said: "Our Industrial segment is a key part of our Company and a strong driver for growth as we continue to expand our non-coal revenue base. Integrating our Industrial Steam Generation group into our Industrial segment will also increase efficiency in our business development efforts and promote more effective cross-selling of related products and services in the industries we serve." About Leslie Kass and her role Before the announcement of Leslie's appointment as Senior Vice President of Industrial, she was the Vice President of Retrofits and Continuous Emissions Monitoring for B&W's Power segment. She was responsible for Company's global retrofits business and worked closely with customers to develop solutions for their steam generation and environmental needs. She also held the positions as Vice President, Investor Relations & Communications, and as Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at B&W in the past. Before joining B&W, Leslie held a number of significant engineering and project management-related positions with Westinghouse, Entergy, and Duke Energy. As the Senior Vice President of B&W's Industrial segment, Leslie will provide strong vision, focus, and direction to the business unit. She will help in accelerating the growth of this segment and diversify B&W's overall revenue stream. Simultaneously, she will be responsible for providing outstanding service to existing customers of the Industrial segment. At the closing bell, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' stock climbed 2.49%, ending the trading session at $11.10. A total volume of 698.27 thousand shares were traded at the end of the day. In the last month, shares of the Company have surged 14.55%. The stock currently has a market cap of $541.01 million. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. 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AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institut


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

If the petroleum industry continues to fight subsidies for nuclear power, the nuclear industry will go after petroleum-industry tax breaks, the president of the Nuclear Energy Institute said Tuesday. "They might say, oh don’t subsidize this, but let me tell you, you open up the books and you might not call it a subsidy but I tell you there’s a lot of tax breaks that the American Petroleum Institute gets," said Maria Korsnick, president and CEO of NEI, the leading nuclear industry lobbying group. "If in fact that’s the playing field that we’re going to be set with, then you’re going to hear more about comparisons of subsidies vs. tax breaks in order to get all the information, if you will, out on the table." When people compare nuclear subsidies to petroleum tax breaks, Korsnick suggested, nuclear will fare well. "I would rather argue about the facts in terms of what value is being brought to the marketplace and what’s the value to the consumer as opposed to battling back and forth relative to this." The American Petroleum Institute, the largest lobbying group for oil and gas companies like ExxonMobile and Chevron, has lobbied against legislative efforts in several states to save aging nuclear plants that are struggling to compete against cheap natural gas and, in some places, cheap renewable energy. In Ohio, for example API Ohio Executive Director Chris Zeigler sent a message to state legislators: “Abundant natural gas has provided Ohio consumers with reliable and affordable energy and created countless jobs throughout the state without government subsidies,” Zeigler said. “Instead of subsidizing nuclear power companies, we should let the markets work to protect consumers." API accused the nuclear industry of misleading consumers about the consequences of closing nuclear plants, arguing that natural gas would continue to lower emissions even if two Ohio plants close. The nuclear industry has won support in New York and Illinois, with Exelon and Entergy benefitting. Lest those victories set a trend, the oil industry is raising objections in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut. "Both of these were important in those states but they were also important to us in that they set a precedent," Korsnick said. "I think what you're seeing right now in the opposition is what happens when you’re successful—so we were successful in New York and we were successful in Illinois and I think now some folks are taking a look at that and saying wait a minute." Korsnick made the remarks at the end of a press conference in which nuclear interests argued again for their technology's relevance in the context of climate change, calling anew for policy changes to lower the cost, speed the deployment, and improve the oversight of new reactors. They released a report by the Global Nexus Initiative (GNI), a partnership between NEI and the Partnership for Global Security, a nuclear security think tank. "Based on our first two years of work, GNI has confirmed that it will be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to meet the goal of the Paris Agreement on climate change to limit temperature increases and decarbonize the global energy sector without a significant contribution from nuclear power," the report says. History of U.S. energy consumption by source[/caption] By Jeff McMahon, based in Chicago. Follow Jeff McMahon on Facebook, Google Plus, Twitter, or email him here.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

NORCROSS, GA--(Marketwired - April 24, 2017) - Comverge, Inc., the leading provider of cloud-based demand response and energy efficiency solutions for electric utilities, today announced a new contract with Entergy Arkansas to deploy a bring your own device (BYOD) demand response pilot. Comverge will aggregate consumer-purchased Wi-Fi-enabled smart thermostats to evaluate a potential new demand response resource for Entergy Arkansas, Inc.

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