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News Article | October 12, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

There are many ways to rank universities, but one that’s rarely considered is how many of their graduates make extraordinary contributions to society. A new analysis does just that, ranking institutions by the proportion of their undergraduates that go on to win a Nobel prize. Two schools dominate the rankings: École Normale Supérieure (ENS) in Paris and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena. These small, elite institutions each admit fewer than 250 undergraduate students per year, yet their per capita production of Nobelists outstrips some larger world-class universities by factors of hundreds. “This is a way to identify colleges that have a history of producing major impact,” says Jonathan Wai, a psychologist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and a co-author of the unpublished study. “It gives us a new way of thinking about and evaluating what makes an undergraduate institution great.” Wai and Stephen Hsu, a physicist at Michigan State University in East Lansing, examined the 81 institutions worldwide with at least three alumni who have received a Nobel award in any of the six categories between 1901 and 2015. To meaningfully compare schools, which have widely varying alumni populations, the team divided the number of Nobel laureates at a school by its estimated number of undergraduate alumni. Many of the top Nobel-producing schools are private, and have significant financial resources. Among the more surprising high performers were several very small US liberal-arts colleges, such as Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania (ranked at number 4) and Amherst College in Massachusetts (number 9). “What these smaller schools are doing might serve as important undergraduate models to follow in terms of selection and training,” says Wai, who adds that, although admission to one of the colleges on the list is no guarantee of important achievements later in life, the probability is much higher for these select matriculates. To gauge trends over time, Wai cut the sample of 870 laureates into 20-year bands. US universities, which now make up almost half of the top 50 list, began to dominate after the Second World War. Whereas French representation in the Nobel ranks has declined over time, top-ranked ENS has remained steady in its output. Hsu and Wai had previously performed two similar, but broader, analyses of the rate at which US universities produce winners of the Nobel prize, Fields Medal (in mathematics) or Turing Award (in computer science), as well as members of the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. These studies produced rankings of US institutions that are similar to the new, global Nobel rankings. Santo Fortunato, a theoretical physicist at Indiana University Bloomington who has researched trends in Nobel prizewinners, deems the analyses “quite interesting”, but cautions that the methodology cannot produce a highly accurate or predictive ranking. “There is a high margin of error due to the low numbers of prominent scholars,” says Fortunato. Wai and Hsu agree that there are statistical uncertainties in their rankings, owing to the small number of prizes awarded each year. The two are confident that the ENS and Caltech lead the pack, but statistical fluctuations could change the order of schools placed from third to ninth, Hsu says. The researchers say that their findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the role that undergraduate institutions have in their graduates’ outstanding accomplishments. They also argue that quantifiable achievements are a better gauge of the quality of universities than factors such as reputation, graduation rate, faculty and financial resources and alumni donations. Says Wai, “Our findings identify colleges that excel at producing impact.”


News Article | October 12, 2016
Site: phys.org

Wild equids such as Spanish Mustangs and wild Burroughs captivate and delight people around the world. To many, these animals represent freedom and adventure. However, these iconic animals are often persecuted because they compete with livestock for limited forage and water. Researcher Prameek M. Kannan, a Master's graduate from Pace University's Environmental Science Program (ENS), travelled to some of the harshest terrain on Earth in order to study the behavior of the most elusive and unknown of all wild equids—the Tibetan wild ass of the Trans-Himalayas. While attempting to establish the first ethograms for this species—a descriptive analysis of their behaviors—Mr. Kannan discovered something unusual. While most sexually active male equids stick to the same territory, he observed a few that were entering other male's territories and courting the females within. Supervised by Dr. Michael H. Parsons of nearby Hofstra University in collaboration with the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF-India), he quantified these behaviors and arrived at some stark conclusions. Whereas male equids have long-been thought to consist mostly of two groups: social bachelors, and solitary, territorial males, they discovered a third male type which they have since named "transients." As published in Behaviour, they determined that because 'transients' routinely move into—and retreat from—other male territories, and based on reduced time spent around other males, increased time spent courting females within other male's territories, with minimal time spent in each courtship event, they appear to employ "sneaky" tactics to secure mating opportunities before hastily retreating. Mr. Kannan expressed this outcome as "a joy to learn something about the unique courtship behavior of a maligned species that has not been thoroughly studied." While Mr. Kannan has now moved onto working in a tiger-infested area mitigating human-wildlife conflict, he is excited about the prospects of geneticists coming to study the transient males to find whether these animals have adapted a true alternative mating system, or whether this social class is a transitionary period where bachelors—not yet ready to challenge a rival—must pass through. Parsons added "while I'm excited about this discovery for science, I am equally pleased for the success of a recent graduate that gave up the creature comforts of modern living in NYC, to endure rough field conditions that persistently challenged his health and ability to cope in some of the harshest environments on Earth." "To me, overcoming the challenges of science in such hostile environments should be celebrated, especially when it results in naming a new social class." Explore further: Male banana fiddler crabs may coerce mating by trapping females in tight burrows More information: Faith E. Parsons et al. The discovery of the 'transient' male Tibetan wild ass: alternative 'sneaky' mating tactics in a wild equid?, Behaviour (2016). DOI: 10.1163/1568539X-00003407


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

MIT biologists have identified a new biomarker that can reveal whether patients with a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer will be helped by paclitaxel (commercially known as Taxol), one of the drugs most commonly used to treat this cancer. The findings could offer doctors a new way to choose drugs for this type of breast cancer, known as triple-negative because it lacks the three most common breast cancer markers: estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Her2 protein. The biomarker, a protein called Mena, has previously been shown to help cancer cells spread through the body. The researchers also showed that combining paclitaxel with another drug that interferes with Mena’s effects can kill the cells much more effectively than paclitaxel alone. “Drugs that target that pathway restore paclitaxel sensitivity to cells expressing Mena,” said Frank Gertler, an MIT professor of biology and a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. “The study also suggests that during the course of treatment it might be worth monitoring the level of Mena. If the levels begin to increase, it might suggest that switching to another type of therapy could be useful.” Gertler is the senior author of the study, which appears in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. Madeleine Oudin, a Koch Institute postdoc, is the paper’s lead author. The Mena protein is known to interact with a cell’s cytoskeleton in ways that help the cell to become mobile. Many cancer patients have an alternative form of the protein known as Mena invasive or MenaINV, which helps cancer cells to spread from their original location through a process known as metastasis. Gertler’s research group has previously found that breast cancer patients who have high levels of the protein’s invasive form tend to have more metastasis and lower survival rates. The researchers wondered if Mena might also play a role in cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy. Between 30 to 70 percent of triple-negative breast cancer patients respond well to chemotherapy, but the disease reappears within six to 10 months, on average. “We know we have good drugs that can kill a lot of cancers, but some people don’t respond to them, and some people do respond but only for a short amount of time,” Oudin said. They tested several different chemotherapy drugs on triple-negative breast cancer cells with varying levels of Mena, and found that those cells with the highest Mena levels were resistant to paclitaxel. However, Mena levels did not affect sensitivity to two other commonly used chemotherapy drugs, doxorubicin and cisplatin. Paclitaxel, which is also used to treat ovarian cancer, works by interfering with microtubules — small tubular proteins that make up the cell’s cytoskeleton and help with cell division. Microtubules can be either dynamic or stable, and the dynamic version is necessary for cell division. Paclitaxel stabilizes the microtubules, interfering with cell division and killing the cells. After giving paclitaxel to mice with metastatic triple-negative tumors, the researchers found that tumors with the highest levels of Mena showed the worst response: The drug did not slow growth of either the original tumors or metastases. This effect was the same whether the tumors expressed the invasive form of Mena or the original version. The researchers also showed that cancer cells with high Mena levels had more dynamic microtubules than cells with low Mena levels. This increase in dynamic microtubules makes it easier for the cells to divide and allows them to resist the effects of paclitaxel. Previous studies have shown that paclitaxel treatment also affects a cellular pathway known as ERK signaling, which is often overactive in cancer cells and drives cell proliferation. Paclitaxel treatment turns on this pathway, which helps cancer cells to survive the treatment, but if an inhibitor of ERK signaling is given at the same time, the treatment is more successful. In the Molecular Cancer Therapeutics study, the MIT team tried the paclitaxel-ERK pathway inhibitor combination in breast cancer cells with high levels of Mena and found that it killed cells much more effectively than paclitaxel alone. Clinical trials are already underway to test this combination of drugs in breast cancer. “Our work would suggest that for a certain subset of patients that have high levels of Mena, that could be an efficient combination to try,” Oudin said. The findings could also help doctors choose treatments for patients based on the levels of Mena in their tumors. To pursue that possibility, the researchers now hope to do studies with human tumor samples to see if they show the same relationship between Mena levels, paclitaxel sensitivity, and patient outcome. This work may be done in collaboration with MetaStat, a company that Gertler and others founded to develop diagnostic tests based on Mena and other biomarkers. “The hope is it may also provide more information on therapeutic choice and potentially spare some patients treatment with a chemotherapy that is likely to be less effective,” Gertler said. “Triple-negative breast cancer patients don’t have many treatment options,” said Bruce Zetter, a professor of cancer biology and surgery at Harvard Medical School. “If this work can help identify patients most likely to respond to Taxol and encourage greater use of the combination of MEK inhibitors and Taxol, that could potentially lead to greater survival of patients with that disease.” The researchers also hope to uncover more of the mechanism of how Mena affects microtubules, and to see if the same interaction plays a role in drug resistance in other types of cancer, such as ovarian cancer. The research was funded by the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, ENS-Cachan, the Ludwig Center at MIT, the National Institutes of Health and National Cancer Institute, the Koch Institute Frontier Research Program through the Kathy and Curt Marble Cancer Research Fund, and the Koch Institute National Cancer Institute core grant.


« Qualcomm to acquire NXP for ~$38B; semiconductor engine for connected world | Main | Volkswagen unveils Atlas; new MQB-based 7-seat SUV; first VW Digital Cockpit in US » Eliminating particulate matter (PM ) from underground car parks in the city center of Eindhoven could result in local reductions in the concentration of these particles of up to 50%, according to a study by researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e). The team based its fingings on air flow models and computer simulations of the city center. The simulations, reported in a paper in Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, suggest the potential effectiveness of an initiative by the environmental innovation company ENS Technology to use underground car parks as air purification sites, or “lungs of the city”. Under the supervision of Professor of Building Physics Bert Blocken, the Eindhoven researchers made a very detailed computational grid of the city center of Eindhoven. This grid covered an area of 5.1 square kilometers and included 16 underground car parks. The researchers used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on the 3D steady RANS equations and an Eulerian advection-diffusion equation. First, an extensive CFD validation study was performed with gas dispersion wind-tunnel measurements. Next, the case study for Eindhoven city center was conducted on the high-resolution grid. Traffic intensities on the streets and in the garages were converted to PM source terms. The garages were ventilated with outdoor air. Simulations were performed with and without removal units in the garages. The placing of 99 air purification systems inside the car parks generally decreases particulate matter concentrations outside the car parks locally by up to 10%. But with the use of 594 air purification units, a substantially larger area—up to a kilometer from the underground car parks—is affected where at least 10% reduction in particulate matter is observed. In certain locations this reduction even peaked to 40 or 50% less. While the simulations have their limitations compared to practice—the force and direction of the wind, for example, can be particularly influential—the researchers conclude that this approach is an effective way of improving the air quality in a city center. ENS (Environmental Nano Solution) Technology devised the idea of capturing particulate matter in underground car parks. The company has developed an innovative technology that turns fine dust into coarse dust, says ENS director Lia Van de Vorle. This is achieved by efficiently charging airborne fine dust particles and capturing them on a grounded collection plate. Since the ventilation systems of the underground car parks are in contact with the streets and shopping zones above, these garages have a considerable influence on the air quality in the city center. By eliminating the particulate matter in these places and by ventilating clean air into the city, underground car parks act as cleansing lungs of the city. The Eindhoven researches used the specifics of the air purification systems of ENS Technology in their simulations. A pilot project in an underground car park has generated a perceptible improvement in the air quality around the car park over the past two years.


News Article | November 2, 2015
Site: phys.org

Picture : The two explosion mechanisms of a rubber balloon. Top line: opening mechanism of a moderately inflated balloon. A crack propagates across the membrane, finally splitting it into two. Bottom line: a highly tensed balloon bursts into a large number of long shreds. The time interval between each image is 0.3 ms. Credit: Sébastien Moulinet A moderately inflated rubber balloon pricked with a needle bursts into two large fragments. However, if you inflate it until it bursts spontaneously, you get dozens of shreds. Now, Sébastien Moulinet and Mokhtar Adda-Bedia at the Laboratoire de Physique Statistique (CNRS/UPMC/ENS/Université Paris Diderot) have explained this phenomenon: when a crack propagating across the surface of a balloon reaches a critical speed, it becomes unstable and splits into two new cracks. It is this mechanism of proliferating cracks that causes the balloon to burst into shreds. The work, published in Physical Review Letters, sheds light on the fragmentation processes in materials subjected to impacts or explosions.


Eliminating particulate matter from underground car parks in the city center of Eindhoven can result in local reductions in the concentration of these particles of up to 50%. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) came to this conclusion on the basis of air flow models and computer simulations of the city center. The simulations prove the effectiveness of an initiative by the environmental innovation company ENS Technology to use underground car parks as air purification sites, or 'lungs of the city'. Under the supervision of Professor of Building Physics Bert Blocken, the Eindhoven researchers made a very detailed computational grid of the city center of Eindhoven. This grid covered an area of 5.1 square kilometers and included 16 underground car parks. The effect on the concentration of particulate matter in the city center air was simulated, following the reduction of the particles inside the underground car parks by a total of 99 or 594 air purification systems. The placing of 99 air purification systems inside the car parks generally decreases particulate matter concentrations outside the car parks locally by up to 10 percent. But with the use of 594 air purification units, a substantially larger area - up to a kilometer from the underground car parks - is affected where at least 10 percent reduction in particulate matter is observed. In certain locations this reduction even peaked to 40 or 50 percent less. Blocken: "I had certainly expected an effect, but not as substantial as this." While the simulations have their limitations compared to practice - the force and direction of the wind, for example, can be particularly influential - the researchers conclude that this approach is an effective way of improving the air quality in a city center. The idea of capturing particulate matter in underground car parks originates from the environmental innovation company 'ENS Technology'. "Since the ventilation systems of the underground car parks are in contact with the streets and shopping zones above, these garages have a considerable influence on the air quality in the city center", says ENS director Lia van de Vorle. "By eliminating the particulate matter in these places and by ventilating clean air into the city, underground car parks act as cleansing lungs of the city." The Eindhoven researches used the specifics of the air purification systems of ENS Technology in their simulations. "The company has developed an innovative technology that turns fine dust into coarse dust", says Van de Vorle. "This is achieved by efficiently charging airborne fine dust particles and capturing them on a grounded collection plate." A pilot project in an underground car park has generated a perceptible improvement in the air quality around the car park over the past two years. "Now that the TU/e study has proven the effectiveness of this idea on the scale of the city center of Eindhoven, we are preparing a pilot in which the real-life effects can be validated in Eindhoven", Van de Vorle says. "Eventually, we plan to implement air purification systems in a variety of infrastructural structures such as tunnels, train and bus stations, viaducts and traffic junctions."


News Article | March 4, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

The enteric nervous system (ENS) is a network of neurons and supporting glial cells in the bowel wall that is essential for digestion1. When ENS precursor cells fail to migrate through the full length of the bowel during the first trimester of pregnancy, a life-threatening birth defect called Hirschsprung disease ensues — a prominent symptom of which is constant contraction of the affected bowel regions2, 3. The standard treatment for children with Hirschsprung disease is removal of the abnormal bowel, but many children continue to have bowel problems after surgery4. On page 105 of this issue, Fattahi et al.5 describe a method for generating ENS precursors from stem cells. Remarkably, transplantation of these cells into an animal model of Hirschsprung disease prevented premature death. The ENS contains about as many neurons as the spinal cord, and its diversity of neuronal subtypes rivals that of the brain6. This complexity allows the ENS to recognize sensory input from both the bowel wall and within the bowel, and to produce integrated bowel motility patterns that facilitate nutrient absorption7. The ENS also influences bowel inflammatory cells, blood vessels, smooth muscle, intestinal pacemakers and the epithelial cells that line the bowel. It is therefore not surprising that children with Hirschsprung disease develop abdominal distension, vomiting and constipation, fail to grow normally and can die from sepsis (a bacterial infection of the bloodstream). At least one-third3 of children with Hirschsprung disease continue to have serious problems after surgery, including a life-threatening syndrome called enterocolitis. Furthermore, some children with this disease have so little bowel that is innervated by the ENS that they require intravenous nutrient delivery to survive. Exciting work8 suggests that regenerative medicine could one day offer an alternative to surgery for treating Hirschsprung disease. In this approach, stem cells would be transplanted into and would restore function in bowel regions in which the ENS is missing. Ideally, the transplanted cells would come from the affected child (known as autologous transplantation) to avoid immune rejection, and non-surgical methods would be used for cell delivery. Of particular interest for this type of therapy are gut-derived ENS stem cells, which can be isolated from the human bowel at all ages and cultured in vitro. Following culture, these stem cells can be reimplanted in the bowel wall. They then migrate to the normal site of the ENS and differentiate into neurons and glial cells that mimic those of the native ENS9. However, this therapeutic approach faces several challenges, including difficulty producing enough gut-derived cells, limited cell migration, limited data about long-term safety and minimal information about the ability of these cells to restore gut function. Fattahi et al. address some of these problems using human embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are derived from early embryos and can give rise to every cell type in the body. To direct differentiation of human ES cells towards an ENS precursor lineage, the authors modulated signalling pathways that control development by inhibiting SMAD and glycogen synthase kinase proteins, and then treated the cells with the metabolite retinoic acid. Under these conditions, human ES cells differentiated into cells that resemble ENS precursors from the vagal region of the developing spinal cord (called the vagal neural crest)10. The authors refer to these cells as enteric neural-crest (ENC) precursors. These ENC precursors shared several key features with ENS precursors. For instance, when transplanted into the vagal neural-crest regions of developing chick embryos, ENC precursors often migrated to the bowel, like normal ENS precursors. When transplanted to the colon of young mice, ENC precursors populated the bowel close to the location of the normal ENS, but migrated even more quickly than fetal ENS-derived cells. When grown alongside human ES-cell-derived smooth-muscle cells, ENC precursors enhanced muscle differentiation and became neurons that could induce muscle contraction when activated. Following an extended period of in vitro culture with vitamin C and the growth factor GDNF, ENC precursors produced diverse neuronal and glial cells similar to those of the ENS. Most impressively, when ENC precursors were transplanted into the colons of mice with Hirschsprung-like disease, survival rates improved dramatically over a short time interval (Fig. 1). Finally, Fattahi et al. used ENC precursors harbouring a genetic mutation that predisposes humans to Hirschsprung disease to perform an in vitro drug screen, and discovered that inhibiting the protease enzyme BACE2 enhanced ENC-precursor migration. The gene that encodes BACE2 is located in a region of chromosome 21 whose duplication increases the risk of Hirschsprung disease. This finding may be relevant to Down syndrome, in which children are born with three copies of chromosome 21 and rates of Hirschsprung disease are increased by as much as 100-fold3. This study establishes a potentially limitless source of cells similar to those of the vagal neural crest that could be tested for use in transplants to treat children with Hirschsprung disease or other disorders in which the ENS is defective. In an ideal therapy, ENC precursors would be produced from 'induced pluripotent' stem cells, which closely resemble human ES cells11, but can be derived from the skin or blood cells of affected children, removing the need for embryo-derived cells and post-transplant immunosuppression. Fattahi and colleagues provide preliminary data to suggest that this strategy will work well. Furthermore, the human ES-cell-derived ENC precursors they produced migrate efficiently through the bowel and could potentially be delivered through an endoscope, avoiding invasive surgery. Although these advances are exciting, many questions remain. In particular, it is unlikely that transplanted ENC precursors recreated a normal ENS in the Hirschsprung model mice, given the rapidity with which transplantation rescued lethal bowel disease. Instead, minimally organized ENC precursors might have modulated immune activity or enhanced epithelial-cell function and repair by releasing neurotransmitter molecules (or other factors). Identifying these ENC-precursor-derived factors might lead to the development of other treatment or prevention strategies that obviate the need for cell-based therapies. Similarly, BACE2 targets that influence ENC-precursor migration could be used to enhance stem-cell therapy or to prevent Hirschsprung disease. Finally, the effect of transplanted ENC precursors on bowel motility and long-term safety needs to be addressed. Nonetheless, Fattahi and colleagues' study moves us one step closer to a time when autologous stem-cell therapy could replace surgery as a primary treatment for children with Hirschsprung disease.


Pointcheval D.,ENS
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2012

Authenticated Key Exchange protocols enable several parties to establish a shared cryptographically strong key over an insecure network using various authentication means, such as strong cryptographic keys or short (i.e., low-entropy) common secrets. The latter example is definitely the most interesting in practice, since no additional device is required, but just a human-memorable password, for authenticating the players. After the seminal work by Bellovin and Merritt, many settings and security notions have been defined, and many protocols have been proposed, in the two-user setting and in the group setting. © 2012 International Association for Cryptologic Research.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

SOVA, a leading Platinum Master Agent for Verizon telecom solutions, just finalized a partnership with Disabled Veteran’s Business Enterprise (DVBE) HSB Solutions—making HSB Solutions a Verizon telecom services agent. In response to the public sector marketplace, HSB Solutions was started by a disabled veteran with a background as a senior project manager and senior systems engineer. HSB Solutions is a networking services company providing resources for government information technology projects. The company is closely affiliated with Enterprise Networking Solutions, Inc. (ENS-Inc.) and shares executive management. Chad Hodges is president of HSB Solutions and vice president of ENS-Inc. He was injured in 2000 while on active duty with the U.S. Marine Corps. Both companies are headquartered in Sacramento, Calif. Hodges expects that ENS-Inc. will partner with SOVA as well. “We have not worked with telecom providers, like Verizon, in the past because there was not a good mechanism for us to do that,” Hodges said. “We are service providers—we design and implement systems, but we don’t have the internal resources to offer telecom services. Working with SOVA has already proved to be an efficient way for us to work with Verizon. They know how to navigate contracts with Verizon and handle the back office details. For lack of a better term they are almost like a channel manager.” Verizon recently opened up its services for agents to sell to the public sector—which is the primary market for HSB Solutions. Prior to that only Verizon direct representatives could sell to that sector. SOVA President Gene Esopi said, “We are looking forward to a long and mutually beneficial relationship with HSB Solutions and Chad. As one of our first public sector agents, HSB Solutions is an excellent entry into that market for us; they have an outstanding reputation for customer service and IT expertise. This also gives us another opportunity to support our troops.” HSB Solutions has master service agreements with most of the 130 State of California departments. “When it comes to what they are looking for in the way of telecom services, each department is unique,” Hodges said. “But they all need basics like connectivity to the internet and telecommunications connectivity.” After only 30 days of working with SOVA, HSB is close to finalizing agreements for Verizon services with two of his major clients. “SOVA did a good job of explaining what the Verizon program is and how it benefits my company as an agent,” Chad said. “I have access to all of the vehicles that Verizon has and SOVA handles all the details, like processing paperwork and ensuring that we are paid promptly. I would recommend SOVA for a number of reasons, not the least of which is that they make working with Verizon seamless and easy.” Verizon Public Sector Solutions, available through SOVA, are specifically designed for the full range of public sector organizations including education, the federal government, state and local governments and public safety. These solutions help increase productivity by enabling greater information access and mobility while maintaining critical security and reliability. They also control costs, simplify management, and increase responsiveness and transparency. As a valued Verizon Partner Program member since 1994, SOVA has earned Platinum level status; agents benefit from select privileges that many telecom solution providers cannot offer. SOVA has customized programs for telecom agents, VARs, MSPs, and telesales organizations and provides customer solutions in every product category including voice and data, network, Cloud, mobility, machine-to-machine, managed internet, VoIP, and global services. SOVA’s award-winning agent program features no quotas, no minimums, no commitments; dedicated pre-sales and post-sales specialists; simplified quoting and ordering; and a state-of-the-art agent portal. SOVA is headquartered in Plains, Pa., with additional locations in Pittston, Pa.; Boston; Denver; and West Palm Beach, Fla. To learn more about SOVA’s top tier agent program, fill out the request form at http://sova.com/contact-us or call Miranda Godlewski at 570.824.6800 ext. 141. To learn more about SOVA visit http://www.sova.com or call 570-824-6800.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Management consultant Paul Ohana and psychologist David Arnow analyze 40 Bible stories and for each give readers a simple take-away to cope more effectively with the leadership challenges they face at work and at home. In “Leadership in the Bible: A Practical Guide for Today” (published by iUniverse), the authors provide examples from the business world and contemporary society that illustrate the usefulness of ancient stories in helping to manage the tests we face as 21st century decision makers. In a clear and concise way, “Leadership in the Bible” highlights situations encountered in everyday life and interprets them in light of what we can learn from the successes, and occasional failures, of 3 key biblical leaders—Abraham, Joseph, and Moses. “Many books that look to the Bible for wisdom are preachy and seek to make readers more religious,” Arnow says. “Our goal is to extract essential lessons from familiar stories that will help you make more effective decisions today.” Utilizing short case studies and the latest research from the fields of management and psychology, “Leadership in the Bible” will appeal to those with or without a background in the Bible. The authors extract lessons from the Bible about basic tasks of leadership including: successfully launching a project; preventing harmful miscommunication: learning from failure; retaining hope in the face of trial; managing, if not avoiding, crisis; and empowering those who rely on you. “Leadership in the Bible” demonstrates that with a fresh approach there’s much to learn from Bible stories that have been central to Western civilization for so many centuries. Interested parties may learn more at http://www.leadershipinthebible.com and facebook.com/leadershipbible. “Leadership in the Bible: A Practical Guide for Today” By Paul Ohana and David Arnow Paperback | 6 x 9 in | 264 pages | ISBN 9781532003141 E-Book | 264 pages | ISBN 9781532003134 Available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble About the Authors Paul Ohana is an international consultant who has managed large organizations and start-ups. He has been training clients in leadership for over 40 years and is the author of five books on management. He has a multidisciplinary education that he received in ENS Telecom, La Sorbonne in Paris and in the USA (Harvard Business School, Pittsburgh Graduate school of Business.) He lives in Paris. David Arnow, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist. He is an investor with decades of leadership experience in the non-profit sector, has published two books on the story of the Exodus and the festival of Passover and was a participating scholar in the web site “Exodus Conversations: How the story of the Exodus Speaks to Jews, Christians and Muslims. He lives in New York. iUniverse, an Author Solutions, LLC, self-publishing imprint, is the leading book marketing, editorial services, and supported self-publishing provider. iUniverse has a strategic alliance with Indigo Books & Music, Inc. in Canada, and titles accepted into the iUniverse Rising Star program are featured in a special collection on BarnesandNoble.com. iUniverse recognizes excellence in book publishing through the Star, Reader’s Choice, Rising Star and Editor’s Choice designations—self-publishing’s only such awards program. Headquartered in Bloomington, Indiana, iUniverse also operates offices in Indianapolis. For more information or to publish a book, please visit iuniverse.com or call 1-800-AUTHORS. For the latest, follow @iuniversebooks on Twitter. ###

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