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News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Earlier this month I mentioned that I had visited Rue Sophie Germain, the only street in Paris named after a woman mathematician. I was wrong! Just a few days after writing that post, I was taking a walk and stopped to photograph some street art when I noticed the word mathématicienne on a street sign. Surprised, I saw that I was at Rue Marie-Louise Dubreil-Jacotin, another Paris street named for a woman mathematician. Sophie is not alone! I have been basing my Paris mathematician street tourism on this helpful page from the MacTutor website. (Incidentally, MacTutor is one of my favorite math history resources. Check it out!) Rue Marie-Louise Dubreil-Jacotin was not on their Paris streets list yet, and that’s why I didn’t know about it. In their defense, the street was only named in 2008, so it may not even have existed when they first put it together. (I sent the MacTutor site authors a note about it, and they've since updated the list.) I was excited to see another street named for a mathématicienne, but I must confess I had never heard of Marie-Louise Dubreil-Jacotin until I stumbled on her street. Dubreil-Jacotin (1905-1972) was the first woman mathematician to be appointed to a full professorship in France and the second woman to earn a doctorate in pure mathematics in France. She placed second in the exam to get into the École Normale Supérieure, but when the official rankings came out, she was listed behind 20 men. Through a connection with a friend, she was able to attend anyway, a few months late. She graduated from the ENS in 1929 and married her classmate Paul Dubreil in 1930. She traveled with him to Göttingen, where she met Emmy Noether and got interested in algebra. She focused on fluid mechanics in her thesis research, though, and earned her doctorate in 1934. Her husband had an appointment at Nancy, to the east of Paris, for the first few years after their marriage, and she, not being allowed to get a position at the same university, worked in Rennes, Poitiers, and Lyon to the west and south. (How they made it work in the days before the fast TGV trains and Skype, especially considering they had a child, is hard for me to understand.) She was made a full professor at Poitiers in 1943, and eventually she and Paul were both able to get jobs in Paris. In addition to her research on fluid mechanics and algebra, she wrote a textbook and wrote about women in mathematics. To learn more about Marie-Louise Dubreil-Jacotin, check out her MacTutor biography or the article “Women mathematicians in France in the mid-twentieth century” by Yvette Kosmann-Schwarzbach. The MacTutor article also has a translation of a remembrance written for the École Normale Supérieure by her classmate and colleague Jean Leray in 1974, not long after Dubreil-Jacotin’s death in 1972. So not one but two streets in Paris are named for women mathematicians. If you’re willing to expand your range ever so slightly beyond the Boulevard Périphérique, you can even increase that number by 50 percent: Rue Emmy Noether is only a few meters from Paris in Saint-Ouen. I have not made my pilgrimage out there yet, but I plan to soon. Wrong in Public is a (thankfully very occasional) series in which I correct errors from previous posts. Read the previous post in this series: Wrong in Public: The Four-Color Theorem Edition


NEW YORK & LEAWOOD, Kan.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Hello Alvin, a mobile healthcare network providing consumers and their families direct access to quality, affordable healthcare through any mobile device, announces a partnership with epay, a Division of Euronet Worldwide, Inc. (NASDAQ: EEFT), a global product processor and distributor serving a network of approximately 294,000 retailer locations and 664,000 points of sale. This partnership brings the Hello Alvin secure, HIPAA-compliant suite of mobile healthcare tools to select epay retail partners, beginning with over 1,200 truck stops and travel centers in May, Love's Travel Stops & Country Stores in June, and rapidly expanding to thousands of distribution points throughout epay’s extensive distribution network. “Designed to meet consumer and family needs for 24-hour convenient access to healthcare, Hello Alvin empowers individuals and families – especially those with limited benefits or little to no insurance coverage – to significantly reduce out-of-pocket medical expenses,” says Arif Razvi, president and co-founder, Hello Alvin. Through its point-of-sale (POS) terminals, Web-based POS solution, integrated POS systems and digital channel retailers, epay distributes a supply of prepaid products from many well-known prepaid brands to retailers of all sizes. The Hello Alvin healthcare product will be sold to consumers as prepaid codes, priced at $100 annually and merchandised alongside other popular prepaid products which epay distributes via its retail distribution network. The annual subscription price includes unlimited Hello Alvin Nurse Line and Email-a-Doctor services and covers the entire family. This first-time in retail offering also provides direct-to-consumer connectivity to the Teladoc physician telehealth network, allowing convenient and bilingual access to care for a wide range of non-emergent conditions ranging from the common cold to acute respiratory infections and the flu. The cost to the patient is a $45 co-pay, significantly less than the cost of treating these conditions in an urgent care or emergency room setting. Bryan Zingg, president, epay North America, says, “This partnership brings to our retail partners an opportunity to offer a unique service previously unavailable at their point of sale. We are proud to be at the forefront of this important paradigm shift that will transform access to care for millions of Americans.” Hello Alvin CEO and co-founder Joey Truscelli is no stranger to the healthcare technology industry, credited with developing one of the largest healthcare transaction clearinghouses in the United States – ENS Health, now part of United Healthcare/Optum. Hello Alvin is a mobile healthcare network providing consumers direct access to healthcare through its secure, HIPAA-compliant suite of mobile telehealth tools. Visit https://helloalvin.com. epay, a Division of Euronet Worldwide, Inc. (NASDAQ: EEFT), is a global prepaid product processor and distribution network, enabling product providers to maximize the sale of their products and services. epay delivers innovative and tailored electronic payment services, cash collection solutions, POS systems integration, settlement and reporting services, and full marketing and distribution service support. Visit http://www.epayworldwide.com/


A new simulation based on the von-Kármán-Sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment, run jointly by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) from Paris and Lyon, takes a closer look at how the liquid vortex created by the device generates a magnetic field. Researchers investigated the effects of fluid resistivity and turbulence on the collimation of the magnetic field, where the vortex becomes a focused stream. They report their findings this week in the journal Physics of Plasmas, from AIP Publishing. The study is the first to examine the flow inside the churning blades at high resolution, and can offer ways to improve laboratory dynamos so that they more accurately recreate stellar astronomical observations. "We hope that, in the future, we can give a better description of the flows," said lead author Jacobo Varela, now a postdoctoral researcher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. "Using this approach, we can begin to understand the dynamo that is observed in the stars." Dynamos turn kinetic energy into magnetic energy by transforming the rotation of an electrically conducting fluid or plasma into a magnetic field. In the VKS dynamo, two impeller blades on either side of a cylinder filled with liquid sodium create turbulence, which can generate the magnetic field. The mechanisms that create that field, however, are poorly understood. Other researchers have performed global simulations of sodium dynamos, but the models yielded low-resolution results. This research models the vortex-shaped flow within a small region next to an impeller inside the VKS dynamo. "The helical flows between the impeller blades collimate the flow that strengthens the magnetic field and generates the field observed in the device," Varela said. The researchers simplified the device's geometry and built focused magnetohydrodynamic simulations to understand how the flow turbulence and the device's material characteristics affect the magnetic field collimation. "We found that when you use magnetized ferromagnetic materials, there is an effective increase in the magnetic field collimation, resulting in a lower dynamo threshold, and this is what they observed in the experiment," Varela said. In contrast, using conducting materials in the simulation weakened field collimation. This finding may explain why researchers can trigger dynamo action in VKS experiments more easily when using soft iron impellers. The researchers also analyzed their results in the context of the mean-field dynamo theory, which attempts to explain how stars and planets sustain their magnetic fields. As the turbulence increased in the simulation, the magnetic field shifted from a steady 1-to-1 with periodic oscillations, such as the ones observed in certain stars. The magnetic field of the sun, for example, switches polarity approximately every 11 years, which is a product of its turbulence and the speed of its rotation. Varela and his colleagues at CNRS continue to develop the model to reflect the actual device's geometry. They plan to investigate additional parameters, such as the blade shape and the magnetic field background, so that they can more closely simulate device performance and test ways to optimize the machine. "The simulation we are performing is just the very first step, but with the model we have now, we can catch a lot of the physics they observe in the VKS dynamo experiment," Varela said. "Our observations and data from the machine will give us much more evidence of the dynamo loop in stars and other astronomical objects." Explore further: Creation of a magnetic field in a turbulent fluid More information: J. Varela et al, Effects of turbulence, resistivity and boundary conditions on helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the Von-Kármán-Sodium dynamo experiment, Physics of Plasmas (2017). DOI: 10.1063/1.4983313


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.treehugger.com

We first covered Roosegaarde Studio’s smog eating tower in 2015, before it was built and sent to China. I noted at the time that “Daan is an artist and provocateur as well as an inventor, so a project like this is going to do a lot more than just clear the air. It has to make a statement. and make the invisible (or at least only partially visible, like smog) visible.” I interviewed him about it at the time, while covering the INDEX: Design to improve life awards, where he was a judge. I have not written about it since, because I really wanted to see the results; is this art, is this a provocation, or is this a practical device? More importantly, is this actually a solution the problem of pollution or is it just a local band-aid? In fact, the results are in, and it actually does work. The Smog Free Tower is a form of electrostatic precipitator where particles are ionized and then attracted to a charged screen. Roosegaarde then collects the dirt and turns it into jewellery. And it does clean the air; according to Prof. dr. Bert Blocken, Eindhoven University of Technology, The Smog Free Tower works with the proven ENS technology of positive ionization to remove large fractions of particulate matter from the air in its immediate surroundings. Both the technology and the Smog Free Tower itself have been successfully evaluated with both field measurements and numerical simulations with Computational Fluid Dynamics. The results confirm that the tower captures and removes up to 70% of the ingested PM10 and up to 50% of the ingested PM2.5. For a tower in an open field in calm weather, this provides PM10 reductions up to 45% and PM2.5 reductions up to 25% in a circle with diameter of more than 20 m around the tower. When the tower is applied in semi-enclosed or enclosed courtyards, the beneficial effects can be much larger. Now Daan has introduced the smog-free bicycle. It will be interesting to see the results of this: But it is a much smaller device, and it is on a moving vehicle. I would have thought that all of the cleaned air would instantly mix with all of the other air. Perhaps if there was a hose from the handlebars to a mask, I could see it working. I also worry that we should spend more time fixing the source of the problem, that putting on masks and building giant air filters is more an admission of failure rather than a step forward. But hey, Dann is right about this: “Beijing used to be an iconic bicycle city. We want to bring back the bicycle as a cultural icon of China and as the next step towards smog free cities.” Because he is such a provocateur, I am sometimes tempted to take Daan Roosegaarde’s ideas with a grain of PM2.5 particulates. But he has shown time and time again that his ideas actually do become a working reality. I look forward to riding this bike. Read more at Studio Roosegaarde.


WASHINGTON, D.C., May 23, 2017 -- The massive, churning core of conducting liquids in stars and some planets creates a dynamo that generates the planetary body's magnetic field. Researchers aim to better understand these dynamos through computer simulations and by recreating them in the laboratory using canisters of rapidly spinning, liquid sodium. A new simulation based on the von-Kármán-Sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment, run jointly by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) from Paris and Lyon, takes a closer look at how the liquid vortex created by the device generates a magnetic field. Researchers investigated the effects of fluid resistivity and turbulence on the collimation of the magnetic field, where the vortex becomes a focused stream. They report their findings this week in the journal Physics of Plasmas, from AIP Publishing. The study is the first to examine the flow inside the churning blades at high resolution, and can offer ways to improve laboratory dynamos so that they more accurately recreate stellar astronomical observations. "We hope that, in the future, we can give a better description of the flows," said lead author Jacobo Varela, now a postdoctoral researcher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. "Using this approach, we can begin to understand the dynamo that is observed in the stars." Dynamos turn kinetic energy into magnetic energy by transforming the rotation of an electrically conducting fluid or plasma into a magnetic field. In the VKS dynamo, two impeller blades on either side of a cylinder filled with liquid sodium create turbulence, which can generate the magnetic field. The mechanisms that create that field, however, are poorly understood. Other researchers have performed global simulations of sodium dynamos, but the models yielded low-resolution results. This research models the vortex-shaped flow within a small region next to an impeller inside the VKS dynamo. "The helical flows between the impeller blades collimate the flow that strengthens the magnetic field and generates the field observed in the device," Varela said. The researchers simplified the device's geometry and built focused magnetohydrodynamic simulations to understand how the flow turbulence and the device's material characteristics affect the magnetic field collimation. "We found that when you use magnetized ferromagnetic materials, there is an effective increase in the magnetic field collimation, resulting in a lower dynamo threshold, and this is what they observed in the experiment," Varela said. In contrast, using conducting materials in the simulation weakened field collimation. This finding may explain why researchers can trigger dynamo action in VKS experiments more easily when using soft iron impellers. The researchers also analyzed their results in the context of the mean-field dynamo theory, which attempts to explain how stars and planets sustain their magnetic fields. As the turbulence increased in the simulation, the magnetic field shifted from a steady 1-to-1 with periodic oscillations, such as the ones observed in certain stars. The magnetic field of the sun, for example, switches polarity approximately every 11 years, which is a product of its turbulence and the speed of its rotation. Varela and his colleagues at CNRS continue to develop the model to reflect the actual device's geometry. They plan to investigate additional parameters, such as the blade shape and the magnetic field background, so that they can more closely simulate device performance and test ways to optimize the machine. "The simulation we are performing is just the very first step, but with the model we have now, we can catch a lot of the physics they observe in the VKS dynamo experiment," Varela said. "Our observations and data from the machine will give us much more evidence of the dynamo loop in stars and other astronomical objects." The article, "Effects of turbulence, resistivity and boundary conditions on helicoidal flow collimation: Consequences for the Von-Kármán-Sodium dynamo experiment," is authored by Jacobo Varela, Sacha Brun, Bérengère Dubrulle and Caroline Nore. The article will appear in Physics of Plasmas May 23, 2017 [DOI: 10.1063/1.4983313). After that date, it can be accessed at http://aip. . Physics of Plasmas is devoted to the publication of original theoretical, computational, and experimental contributions to the dynamics of gases, liquids, and complex or multiphase fluids. See http://pof. .


The massive, churning core of conducting liquids in stars and some planets creates a dynamo that generates the planetary body's magnetic field. Researchers aim to better understand these dynamos through computer simulations and by recreating them in the laboratory using canisters of rapidly spinning, liquid sodium. A new simulation based on the von-Kármán-Sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment, run jointly by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) from Paris and Lyon, takes a closer look at how the liquid vortex created by the device generates a magnetic field. Researchers investigated the effects of fluid resistivity and turbulence on the collimation of the magnetic field, where the vortex becomes a focused stream. They report their findings this week in the journal Physics of Plasmas, from AIP Publishing. The study is the first to examine the flow inside the churning blades at high resolution, and can offer ways to improve laboratory dynamos so that they more accurately recreate stellar astronomical observations. "We hope that, in the future, we can give a better description of the flows," said lead author Jacobo Varela, now a postdoctoral researcher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. "Using this approach, we can begin to understand the dynamo that is observed in the stars." Dynamos turn kinetic energy into magnetic energy by transforming the rotation of an electrically conducting fluid or plasma into a magnetic field. In the VKS dynamo, two impeller blades on either side of a cylinder filled with liquid sodium create turbulence, which can generate the magnetic field. The mechanisms that create that field, however, are poorly understood. Other researchers have performed global simulations of sodium dynamos, but the models yielded low-resolution results. This research models the vortex-shaped flow within a small region next to an impeller inside the VKS dynamo. "The helical flows between the impeller blades collimate the flow that strengthens the magnetic field and generates the field observed in the device," Varela said. The researchers simplified the device's geometry and built focused magnetohydrodynamic simulations to understand how the flow turbulence and the device's material characteristics affect the magnetic field collimation. "We found that when you use magnetized ferromagnetic materials, there is an effective increase in the magnetic field collimation, resulting in a lower dynamo threshold, and this is what they observed in the experiment," Varela said. In contrast, using conducting materials in the simulation weakened field collimation. This finding may explain why researchers can trigger dynamo action in VKS experiments more easily when using soft iron impellers. The researchers also analyzed their results in the context of the mean-field dynamo theory, which attempts to explain how stars and planets sustain their magnetic fields. As the turbulence increased in the simulation, the magnetic field shifted from a steady 1-to-1 with periodic oscillations, such as the ones observed in certain stars. The magnetic field of the sun, for example, switches polarity approximately every 11 years, which is a product of its turbulence and the speed of its rotation. Varela and his colleagues at CNRS continue to develop the model to reflect the actual device's geometry. They plan to investigate additional parameters, such as the blade shape and the magnetic field background, so that they can more closely simulate device performance and test ways to optimize the machine. "The simulation we are performing is just the very first step, but with the model we have now, we can catch a lot of the physics they observe in the VKS dynamo experiment," Varela said. "Our observations and data from the machine will give us much more evidence of the dynamo loop in stars and other astronomical objects."


LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / May 25, 2017 / Active Wall St. blog coverage looks at the headline from Charlotte, North Carolina based Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: BW) ("B&W") as the Company announced on May 23, 2017 that its Industrial Steam Generation group will transition from the Power segment to the Industrial segment. The transition will be w.e.f. July 01, 2017. The Company also announced the appointment of Leslie Kass, who will take over as Senior Vice President, Industrial. The appointment is effective immediately. Register with us now for your free membership and blog access at: One of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' competitors within the Industrial Electrical Equipment space, EnerSys (NYSE: ENS), announced on May 04, 2017, its preliminary financial results for Q4 FY17 and full year FY17 which ended on March 31, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on EnerSys in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its blog coverage on BW; touching on ENS. Get all of our free blog coverage and more by clicking on the link below: B&W is a global leader in energy and environmental technologies and services for power and industrial markets. The Company was established by Stephen Wilcox and George Babcock in 1857 as Babcock, Wilcox & Company to manufacture and market the water tube boiler patented by Stephen Wilcox. The Company completes 150 years in FY17, and it has operations, subsidiaries and joint ventures across the globe. The Company employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. Changes in the Industrial Segment From July 01, 2017, the Industrial segment will include B&W MEGTEC subsidiary based in DePere, Wisconsin, B&W SPIG subsidiary based in Arona, Italy, B&W Universal subsidiary based in Stoughton, Wisconsin, Industrial Steam Generation group, which will continue to be based in Barberton, Ohio. The Industrial segment provides a wide range of custom-engineered technologies for cooling, environmental, noise abatement, and industrial steam generation applications, as well as related aftermarket services. The Industrial Steam Generation group, which has now been added to the Industrial segment, recorded revenue of more than $100 million in FY16. After the addition of the Industrial Steam Generation group, the Industrial segment will be B&W's second-largest business unit with approximately $550 million in annual revenues. Commenting on the organizations restructuring, E. James Ferland, Chairman and CEO of B&W said: "Our Industrial segment is a key part of our Company and a strong driver for growth as we continue to expand our non-coal revenue base. Integrating our Industrial Steam Generation group into our Industrial segment will also increase efficiency in our business development efforts and promote more effective cross-selling of related products and services in the industries we serve." About Leslie Kass and her role Before the announcement of Leslie's appointment as Senior Vice President of Industrial, she was the Vice President of Retrofits and Continuous Emissions Monitoring for B&W's Power segment. She was responsible for Company's global retrofits business and worked closely with customers to develop solutions for their steam generation and environmental needs. She also held the positions as Vice President, Investor Relations & Communications, and as Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at B&W in the past. Before joining B&W, Leslie held a number of significant engineering and project management-related positions with Westinghouse, Entergy, and Duke Energy. As the Senior Vice President of B&W's Industrial segment, Leslie will provide strong vision, focus, and direction to the business unit. She will help in accelerating the growth of this segment and diversify B&W's overall revenue stream. Simultaneously, she will be responsible for providing outstanding service to existing customers of the Industrial segment. At the closing bell, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' stock climbed 2.49%, ending the trading session at $11.10. A total volume of 698.27 thousand shares were traded at the end of the day. In the last month, shares of the Company have surged 14.55%. The stock currently has a market cap of $541.01 million. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst, for further information on analyst credentials, please email [email protected]. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institut


LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / May 25, 2017 / Active Wall St. blog coverage looks at the headline from Charlotte, North Carolina based Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: BW) ("B&W") as the Company announced on May 23, 2017 that its Industrial Steam Generation group will transition from the Power segment to the Industrial segment. The transition will be w.e.f. July 01, 2017. The Company also announced the appointment of Leslie Kass, who will take over as Senior Vice President, Industrial. The appointment is effective immediately. Register with us now for your free membership and blog access at: One of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' competitors within the Industrial Electrical Equipment space, EnerSys (NYSE: ENS), announced on May 04, 2017, its preliminary financial results for Q4 FY17 and full year FY17 which ended on March 31, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on EnerSys in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its blog coverage on BW; touching on ENS. Get all of our free blog coverage and more by clicking on the link below: B&W is a global leader in energy and environmental technologies and services for power and industrial markets. The Company was established by Stephen Wilcox and George Babcock in 1857 as Babcock, Wilcox & Company to manufacture and market the water tube boiler patented by Stephen Wilcox. The Company completes 150 years in FY17, and it has operations, subsidiaries and joint ventures across the globe. The Company employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. Changes in the Industrial Segment From July 01, 2017, the Industrial segment will include B&W MEGTEC subsidiary based in DePere, Wisconsin, B&W SPIG subsidiary based in Arona, Italy, B&W Universal subsidiary based in Stoughton, Wisconsin, Industrial Steam Generation group, which will continue to be based in Barberton, Ohio. The Industrial segment provides a wide range of custom-engineered technologies for cooling, environmental, noise abatement, and industrial steam generation applications, as well as related aftermarket services. The Industrial Steam Generation group, which has now been added to the Industrial segment, recorded revenue of more than $100 million in FY16. After the addition of the Industrial Steam Generation group, the Industrial segment will be B&W's second-largest business unit with approximately $550 million in annual revenues. Commenting on the organizations restructuring, E. James Ferland, Chairman and CEO of B&W said: "Our Industrial segment is a key part of our Company and a strong driver for growth as we continue to expand our non-coal revenue base. Integrating our Industrial Steam Generation group into our Industrial segment will also increase efficiency in our business development efforts and promote more effective cross-selling of related products and services in the industries we serve." About Leslie Kass and her role Before the announcement of Leslie's appointment as Senior Vice President of Industrial, she was the Vice President of Retrofits and Continuous Emissions Monitoring for B&W's Power segment. She was responsible for Company's global retrofits business and worked closely with customers to develop solutions for their steam generation and environmental needs. She also held the positions as Vice President, Investor Relations & Communications, and as Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at B&W in the past. Before joining B&W, Leslie held a number of significant engineering and project management-related positions with Westinghouse, Entergy, and Duke Energy. As the Senior Vice President of B&W's Industrial segment, Leslie will provide strong vision, focus, and direction to the business unit. She will help in accelerating the growth of this segment and diversify B&W's overall revenue stream. Simultaneously, she will be responsible for providing outstanding service to existing customers of the Industrial segment. At the closing bell, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' stock climbed 2.49%, ending the trading session at $11.10. A total volume of 698.27 thousand shares were traded at the end of the day. In the last month, shares of the Company have surged 14.55%. The stock currently has a market cap of $541.01 million. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst, for further information on analyst credentials, please email info@activewallst.com. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institut LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / May 25, 2017 / Active Wall St. blog coverage looks at the headline from Charlotte, North Carolina based Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises, Inc. (NYSE: BW) ("B&W") as the Company announced on May 23, 2017 that its Industrial Steam Generation group will transition from the Power segment to the Industrial segment. The transition will be w.e.f. July 01, 2017. The Company also announced the appointment of Leslie Kass, who will take over as Senior Vice President, Industrial. The appointment is effective immediately. Register with us now for your free membership and blog access at: One of Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' competitors within the Industrial Electrical Equipment space, EnerSys (NYSE: ENS), announced on May 04, 2017, its preliminary financial results for Q4 FY17 and full year FY17 which ended on March 31, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on EnerSys in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its blog coverage on BW; touching on ENS. Get all of our free blog coverage and more by clicking on the link below: B&W is a global leader in energy and environmental technologies and services for power and industrial markets. The Company was established by Stephen Wilcox and George Babcock in 1857 as Babcock, Wilcox & Company to manufacture and market the water tube boiler patented by Stephen Wilcox. The Company completes 150 years in FY17, and it has operations, subsidiaries and joint ventures across the globe. The Company employs more than 5,000 people worldwide. Changes in the Industrial Segment From July 01, 2017, the Industrial segment will include B&W MEGTEC subsidiary based in DePere, Wisconsin, B&W SPIG subsidiary based in Arona, Italy, B&W Universal subsidiary based in Stoughton, Wisconsin, Industrial Steam Generation group, which will continue to be based in Barberton, Ohio. The Industrial segment provides a wide range of custom-engineered technologies for cooling, environmental, noise abatement, and industrial steam generation applications, as well as related aftermarket services. The Industrial Steam Generation group, which has now been added to the Industrial segment, recorded revenue of more than $100 million in FY16. After the addition of the Industrial Steam Generation group, the Industrial segment will be B&W's second-largest business unit with approximately $550 million in annual revenues. Commenting on the organizations restructuring, E. James Ferland, Chairman and CEO of B&W said: "Our Industrial segment is a key part of our Company and a strong driver for growth as we continue to expand our non-coal revenue base. Integrating our Industrial Steam Generation group into our Industrial segment will also increase efficiency in our business development efforts and promote more effective cross-selling of related products and services in the industries we serve." About Leslie Kass and her role Before the announcement of Leslie's appointment as Senior Vice President of Industrial, she was the Vice President of Retrofits and Continuous Emissions Monitoring for B&W's Power segment. She was responsible for Company's global retrofits business and worked closely with customers to develop solutions for their steam generation and environmental needs. She also held the positions as Vice President, Investor Relations & Communications, and as Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at B&W in the past. Before joining B&W, Leslie held a number of significant engineering and project management-related positions with Westinghouse, Entergy, and Duke Energy. As the Senior Vice President of B&W's Industrial segment, Leslie will provide strong vision, focus, and direction to the business unit. She will help in accelerating the growth of this segment and diversify B&W's overall revenue stream. Simultaneously, she will be responsible for providing outstanding service to existing customers of the Industrial segment. At the closing bell, on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, Babcock & Wilcox Enterprises' stock climbed 2.49%, ending the trading session at $11.10. A total volume of 698.27 thousand shares were traded at the end of the day. In the last month, shares of the Company have surged 14.55%. The stock currently has a market cap of $541.01 million. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. 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If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institut


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Like a crocodile's jaw opening and snapping shut, Earth's crust can rip apart and then violently close back up during an earthquake, a new study finds. The discovery refutes previous claims that this kind of phenomenon was impossible, and the new research could potentially require that current seismic maps be redrawn. The study focused on a particular paradox associated with thrust faults, a crack in Earth’s crust, where geologic forces are slowly pushing a huge slab of continental crust up and over an oceanic layer. "For a long time, it was assumed that thrust faults, subduction zone faults being a class of such faults, could not have a large amount of slip close to the Earth's surface," said Harsha Bhat, a research scientist at the École Normale Supérieure (ENS) in Paris and co-author of the new study with California Institute of Technology graduate student Vahe Gabuchian. [The 10 Biggest Earthquakes in History] The assumption was made because as the continental slab grinds over the oceanic one below, it scrapes off the soft surface clay and leaves it piled up in the subduction zone. Geologists thought that any energy generated from a seismic event within the thrust fault would peter out once it hit the soft clay and that a large slip wouldn't happen near the surface. But clues from past earthquakes suggested otherwise, said Christopher Scholz, a professor of geophysics at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York City. The San Fernando earthquake that occurred in 1971, for example, left behind an unusual pile of debris that anyone can still see today, said Scholz, who was not involved with the new study. "It's right at the base of a mountain," he said. "The thrust comes out at a low angle, and it looks like [the earthquake] flapped the whole soil layer, just flipped it over below the fault." How did the earthquake cause such a giant amount of material to flip over if the energy dissipated in the clay? Geophysicist James Brune, then at the University of Nevada was the first scientist to attempt to answer that question in a 1996 study he published in the Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Science, Scholz said. Brune figured it was the result of some kind of torquing action in the fault. He conducted an experiment using foam rubber that showed the energy of a simulated earthquake propagating down a fault and flipping the tip — as if some large hand were cracking a whip. "I don't think people believed it," Scholz said. "They thought this was some weird thing that had to do with foam. They didn't take it seriously." For decades, the idea lay dormant, he said. But clues from subsequent earthquakes continued to suggest that Brune had been on to something. In their new paper, Bhat, Gabuchian and their colleagues cited the 1999 magnitude-7.7 earthquake in Chi-Chi, Taiwan, that caused billions of dollars in structural damage and killed more than 2,000 people. They also pointed to the magnitude-9.0 earthquake in Tohoku-Oki, Japan, that damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011. Geophysicists who analyzed the faults after the earthquakes could not find signs of stress at the boundary between the soft clay and harder rock. "How can it slip without stress?" Scholz said. "That's the big mystery." And it's a mystery that Gabuchian and his colleagues think they have solved. The researchers performed an experiment similar to Brune's from 1996, but they did not use foam. Instead, the scientists used a transparent block of plastic that has mechanical properties similar to those of rock, and conducted experiments in Caltech's earthquake laboratory, nicknamed the "Seismological Wind Tunnel," a facility that can simulate and image laboratory-generated temblors. The researchers cut the plastic block in half and then forced them together, simulating the tectonic pressure of two slabs of Earth's crust pressing against each other. Next, they placed a wire fuse where they envisioned the epicenter of an earthquake and then lit the fuse. Instantly, a rupture propagated down the fault line, and when it hit the surface, the fault twisted open and then snapped shut. The snapping action reduces the stress that keeps both sides of a fault pressed together, said Bhat. Less pressure makes it easier for a slab of rock to slide.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: motherboard.vice.com

Back when .com was the only top-level domain (TLD) that really mattered, choice domain names would change hands for millions of dollars. But in recent years the number of TLD's has greatly expanded, and tech startups often choose to snap up a .co, .io, or even .digital cheaply instead of forking out for one of the more well established extensions. Generic TLDs are interchangeable in terms of function, but when an extension corresponds to a specific use case, scarcity increases and price goes up—which is exactly what has happened with the new Ethereum Name Service, which went live on May 4, and which allows users to register .eth domains compatible with the Ethereum network. Ethereum, although less well known than Bitcoin, is a blockchain-based computing platform which includes a cryptocurrency, called Ether. But unlike Bitcoin it also includes the capability to run "smart contracts," code functions that are stored in the blockchain and can trigger actions like transferring currency when certain conditions are met. The .eth domain extension is unique in that it can be pointed to an Ethereum wallet address or a smart contract, meaning that an amount of Ether could be sent directly to, say, Motherboard.eth instead of a standard address (which has the less memorable format 0xffF067E7ebe44Cc949C1c49Ca069BCFb4022b5fc). The new domains can be registered through an auction process run by Codetract.io, and the chance to register a personalized and/or prestigious address has captured the interest of the Ethereum community, which has currently bid a total of over 105,000ETH on domains ($9.4 million at current rates), with only 12 percent of the domains featuring in this auction round having been opened to bidding. This race for domains takes place against the background of a huge rise in the value of Ether, which has increased more than tenfold from $8 for one unit on January 1 to a current price hovering around $90. This influx of money into the ecosystem has also stimulated a burst of interest in Ethereum-based projects, as companies or individuals holding Ethereum find themselves with significantly more resources to apply to development. (Crowdfund campaigns backed by Ethereum tokens now regularly raise millions of dollars in a short space of time, and besides established players in the cryptocurrency space, even the UN has started to experiment with the platform.) On an ongoing basis, progress of the registration process can be tracked via the ENS Twitter bot, which posts a steady stream of updates on the latest auctions and winning bids. Sharp-eyed bidders might spot that with less than a day left to bid, donaldtrump.eth is priced at a mere $2880—though the president, who has a penchant for owning Trump domains, has yet to confirm whether he is behind this particular deal.

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